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Publication numberUS1774258 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 26, 1930
Filing dateJul 8, 1929
Priority dateJul 8, 1929
Publication numberUS 1774258 A, US 1774258A, US-A-1774258, US1774258 A, US1774258A
InventorsRaymond A English
Original AssigneeRaymond A English
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Duplex capsule or the like
US 1774258 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 26, 1930. A. ENGLISH 1,774,258

DUPLEX CAPSULE OR THE LIKE Filed-Ju-1y 8, 1929 Gttornegsf Patented ug. 26, i 1930 UNITEDl sf'ra'rasy BAYMON D A. ENGLISH, OF CLAY CITY, INDIANA DUPLEX CAPSULE OR THE LIKE- Application led July 8,

This invention relates ,to containers, and

especially to containers for storing separately ingredients which are to be later mixed together, such as mercury and another metal or metals to produce an amalgam for dentists use.

An object .of the invention resides in the provision of a compartment receptacle or container in which the several ingredients m may be separately stored and shipped, thereby providing for the exact measuring of the materials, preferably at the factory, thus avoiding waste of material such as occurs yin the ha-phaza-rd mixing of the materials as now practiced by dentists.

A further object of the invention consists in the provision of such a container in which the separately stored ingredients may be brought together for mixing by merely pressing t-he ends of the container toward each other, or by applying a turning movement to one end of the container with .respect to the other end.

Other objects of the invention will be apparent from the following description when taken in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which Figure l is a perspective view of one of the loaded containers or capsules.

Figure 2 is a longitudinal section through the capsule of Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a similar view of a. slightly modified construction.

Figures 4 and 5 are perspective views of4 further modified forms of oneof the capsule ends; and

Figure 6 is a lo Uitudinal section through a still further modriedconstruction.

The present container which I will now de- 40 scribe in detail is intended for use in connection with an amalgamator such as'disclosed in my copending application, Serial No. 371.591,-f1ed June 17 1929.

The duplex capsule 1 as depicted in Figures 1 and 2 comprises two telescoping sections2 and 3 of celophane or-othe;` material common in the construction of capsule containers'and the like. In the present instance, however, a

partition 4, also'fformed of gelatine, -is pro-'-- vided to prevent communication between the 1929. serial no. avezs.

two ends of the container." Thispartition is formed with a skirt or. flange 5 of sufficient diameter to engage over the open end of the section 3 of the capsuleand is preferably provided with an outturned lip or flange 6 which .55 abuts against the edge of the section 2 of the capsule. 1 The mercury 7 andgranular metal 8, or-

'Whatever ingredients may be employed, are` placed in the respective ends of the capsule,\co and the partition`4is put in. closing position f on the section 3, prior to bringing the two"` capsule sections into final poistion as shown in Figures 1 and 2. The cap 4 may be held. in position friction'all or cement may be emc5 ployed if desired.. '111e completed packageA is now ready for shipment or storage and when desired for use ythe operator merely presses the sections 2'and 3 toward each other so as to break the partition 4. -:By this means 'i0 the previously separated in redients are brought together and may ge intimately mixed by placing the container and contents in the holding clips of the mixing machine as above referred to.- 1

It will be readily apparent to those skilled 1n the art that apackage as just described is of considerable value in dentistry aswell as other arts in which the mixing of small amounts of materials is necessary. For instance, by the use of such a container the ingredients may be accurately measured out at the factory and. placed in the containers,

thereby not only insuring an absolutely correct proportioning of the ingredients but also 85'- avoiding a waste of materials such asis nece'sv sarily occasioned when the materials are hurriedly poured out from a storage supply durl' ing the process of i-lling a tooth, prepa-ring an inlay, or the like. Furthermore, 1n prac- 9c ticing the old method of preparing amalgams,

cements or the like, a considerable messing of the laboratory table, tools, etc., was inyvolvedwhich 'is entirely eliminated by usingv the duplex capsule.. Moreover, the novelconta'iner disclosed herein provides for maintaining the materials in a most sanitary cony dition at all times byexcluding air, fumes, moisture` andthe lik andyet permits of -theirinstant mixing'lby erely pressingthe 100 'invention the respective sections are pressed together so as to cause the cutter 12 to penetrate the partition 4, and the sections may then be turned relatively so as to cause the partition to be cut loose from its ange 5 and thus permit the ingredients to be brought together. In other respects the disclosures of Figures 3, 4 and 5 are identical with the previously described construction.

In Figure 6 a somewhat different construc- -tion is disclosed which involves a separation of the capsule sections prior to the mixing of the ingredients. In this form of the invention the capsule 15 is of conventionaltype and may be employed for storing either of the ingredients used. The compartment for the second ingredient is provided by a third Vsection or cap portion 16 which telescopes over the capsule 15 and is preferably frictionally` held thereon.

IVhere this last described embodiment of the invention is used the materials may be brought together by first removing the cupv 16, the sections of the capsule 15 are then separated and the contents of the cap 16 placed in the section containing the metal 8, after which the main capsule sections are brought together and the package is ready Jfor the mixing machine.

From the foregoing description it will readily appear that by the present construction of duplex capsule and package I have provided for sanitary shipment and storage of exact proportions of ingredients to be later combined; that the ingredients'thus prepared are ready for instant use by the operatgr without the necessity of weighing or gauging;l that the ingredients are immediately brought together byy a mere pressing together' of the ends of the container and are then contained in the mixing receptacle ready `for insertion in an amalgamator or other mixingl receptacle; that the process of mixing may be carried out without in any way messing up the laboratory table, tools, etc.; and that the quantities of materia-ls placed in the compartments of the containers may be graduated and the containers suitably marked soas to provide for large, small or intermediate mixtures of the final product.

, In accordance with the patent statutes I have described'what I now believe to be the preferred embodiments of the invention, but inasmuch as various minor changes may be made in the details of construction without inany way departing from the spirit of the invention I aim to include all such changes within the scope ofthe appended claims.

What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A duplex capsule comprising two telescopic sections and a partition, said parts be: ing constructed and arranged to break said partition by a relative Inovementof the telescopic sections.

Q. A duplex capsule including a body portion comprised of two a partition so disposed as to be broken when the sections of the capsule are pressed toward each other.

3. A duplex capsule including a body portion comprised of two telescopic sections, a partition, a flange on said partition engaging over the open end of one of said sections, said elements being constructed and arranged so as to apply a disrupting force to the partition when the sections are pressed toward each other.

4. A duplex capsule including a body portion comprised of two telescopic sections, a partition disposed transversely of said capsule, and means on one of said sections to break said partition when 'the sections are pressed toward each other.

5. A duplex capsule including a body portion comprised of two telescopic sections, a partition disposed transversely of said capsule, and a cutter on one of said sections adapted to puncture the partition when the sections are pressed toward each other and to cut the partition as one of the sections `is rotated with respect to the other.

6. A packagecomprising a compartment receptacle formed of telescopic sections, matement.

RAYMOND A. ENGLISH.

telescopic sections and

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2451015 *Apr 26, 1944Oct 12, 1948Adams Heston DDispensing package for cartridge reloading components
US2487236 *Dec 31, 1947Nov 8, 1949Alvin A GreenbergCompartmented container having a rupturable partition
US2527991 *Nov 21, 1947Oct 31, 1950Greenberg Alvin AContainer
US2527992 *Nov 21, 1947Oct 31, 1950Greenberg Alvin ACapsule
US2662018 *Jun 14, 1949Dec 8, 1953Clarence L SmithFrozen food indicator
US2835380 *Mar 16, 1955May 20, 1958Redington Co F BPackage and method of forming
US2936493 *Jun 16, 1955May 17, 1960Scherer Corp R PMethod of making plastic capsules
US3003682 *May 1, 1959Oct 10, 1961Mattson Roger PMaterial mixing bags
US3016134 *Jul 1, 1959Jan 9, 1962Harold BorsukDental amalgam package
US3023889 *May 5, 1958Mar 6, 1962Barr Roy EApparatus for use in preparing dental amalgams
US3095291 *May 12, 1961Jun 25, 1963Robbins Albert ACooling envelope with breakable diaphragm
US3139181 *Nov 21, 1961Jun 30, 1964Koberloy IncContainer of dental alloy
US3186910 *Mar 8, 1962Jun 1, 1965Jacob A GlassmanMethod for producing peroral capsules
US3404723 *Feb 25, 1966Oct 8, 1968Bernard F. McnickleMethod for producing dental molds or molding material
US3415360 *Dec 19, 1966Dec 10, 1968Dentaire Ivoclar EtsReceptacle for dental preparations
US3451540 *Dec 12, 1967Jun 24, 1969Pennsalt Chemicals CorpDisposable mixing capsule
US3532521 *Feb 3, 1969Oct 6, 1970Ncr CoAmalgamation mixture containing encapsulated mercury
US3937213 *Jun 29, 1973Feb 10, 1976Mcdonald BernardBody fluid collection device
US4304869 *May 27, 1980Dec 8, 1981American Sterilizer CompanyApparatus for rupturing a sealed, frangible container
US4515267 *Nov 16, 1983May 7, 1985Dentsply Research & Development Corp.Dental mixing and extrusion capsule
US4871261 *Sep 29, 1988Oct 3, 1989Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyVacuum mixing apparatus for dental materials
US4883182 *Jan 12, 1988Nov 28, 1989Hughes Raymond JTamper evident capsule and insert device
US5415868 *Jun 9, 1993May 16, 1995L. Perrigo CompanyCaplets with gelatin cover and process for making same
US6080426 *Jan 11, 1996Jun 27, 2000Warner-Lamberg CompanyProcess for encapsulation of caplets in a capsule and solid dosage forms obtainable by such process
US6245350Apr 5, 1996Jun 12, 2001Warner-Lambert CompanyProcess for encapsulation of caplets in a capsule and solid dosage forms obtainable by such process
US6443307Jan 25, 2000Sep 3, 2002Michael D. BurridgeMedication dispenser with an internal ejector
US7219796 *Nov 3, 2003May 22, 2007Vision International Production, Inc.Dispensing capsule for a liquid container
US8061006Jul 25, 2002Nov 22, 2011Powderject Research LimitedParticle cassette, method and kit therefor
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/222, 53/443, 220/DIG.340, 604/416, 220/500, 264/DIG.370, 53/900, 53/467, 433/226, 62/530
International ClassificationA61C5/06, A61J3/07
Cooperative ClassificationY10S53/90, A61C5/066, A61J3/071, Y10S264/37, Y10S220/34
European ClassificationA61C5/06C, A61J3/07B