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Publication numberUS1775819 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 16, 1930
Filing dateSep 10, 1926
Priority dateSep 12, 1925
Publication numberUS 1775819 A, US 1775819A, US-A-1775819, US1775819 A, US1775819A
InventorsHerbert Fischer, Lasar Grodnitzky
Original AssigneeHerbert Fischer, Lasar Grodnitzky
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cooling device
US 1775819 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

se mmsao. H. FISCHER ET AL 1,775,319

COOLING DEVICE Filed Sept. 10, 1926 4 Shoots-Sheet l INVENTORS J] W nzwr y'iflzu/ WW1 ATTORNEY.

Se t. 16, 1930. H. FISCHER ET AL 1,775,819

COOLING DEVICE Filed Sept. 10, 1926 4 Shoots-Shoot 2 I IIIIIIIIIIII! I IIIIIIIIIIIII 7 INVENTORJ' BY I 5322: 1%?

7 ATTORNEY.

Sept. 16, 1930. H. FISCHER ET AL 1,775,819

COOLING. DEVI CE INVENTORS BY gm 2%; ATTORNEY.

Sept. 16, 1930. H. FISCHER E AL 1,775,819

COOLING DEVICE Filed Sept. 10, 1926 4 Shoots-Shoot 4 IIIIIIIIIIATIIIIIIII'IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIKIII III" ' fit; ATTORNEY.

Patented Sept. 16, 1930 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE HERBERT FISCHER AND LASAR GRODNITZKY, OF DARMSTADT, GERMANY Our invention relates to cooling devices, and more particularly to cooling plates which are used in the manufacture of soap, fat, tallow, chocolate, and the like. Heretofore,

said cooling plates have been made from east or wrought iron, but we have discovered that various advantages may be obtained, if cool ing plates are made of pressed parts, and therefore, the object of the present invention is to produce cooling plates which are made from pressed or stamped parts, either with or without the use of pressed or rolled corrugated sheet metal.

In the accompanying drawing, in which We have shown, by way of illustration, various embodiments of our invention, Fig. 1 is a plan view of a complete cooling apparatus with the top plate removed; Fig. 2 is a longitudinal section along line 22 in Fig. 1, and Fig. 3 is a transverse section along line 33 in Fig. 1; Fig. 4 shows a detail, partly in section, on a larger scale; Fig. 5 is another sectional detail view on a larger scale; Fig. 6 is a similar view as Fig. 1 showing a modification; Fig. 7 is a longitudinal section along line 77 in Fig. 6; Fig, 8 is a transverse section along line 88 in Fig. 6; Fig. 9 is an enlarged section through the frame of the device; Fig. 10 is a plan view of a modified form of the frame; Fig. 11 is a section along line 1111 of Fig. 10; Fig. 12 is an enlarged detail section on the line 1212 of Fig. 10; Fig. 13 is a plan view of a modified cooling device with a portion of the top plate broken away; Fig. 14 is a longitudinal section therethrough along line 14.14:1Il Fig. 13 and Fig. 15 is an enlarged detail view.

The cooling plate shown in Figs. 13 comprises two metal plates 1, 2, which are pressed out or stamped in such a way as to form ribs 3 extending from the one edge of the plates and rising at ornear the opposite edge, as clearly shown in Fig. 3, the ribs thus forming a series of troughs open at one end. The two plates are so placed together that the ribs 3 of one plate alternate with those of the other, as clearly appears fromFig.2,the open ends of the troughs formed by the ribs of one plate being on one side of the plates while the open ends of the troughs formed by the ribs DEVICE 134,634, and in Germany, September 12, 1925.

of the other plate are on the opposite side. The ribs, besides imparting the required stiffness to the entire cooling device, also thus contribute to a favorable distribution of the cooling medium. The troughs formed by the ribs 3 also receive blocks 4, placed at the open end of each trough, which blocks, as shown in Fig. 4, are held in place by screwbolts 5 passing through the ribs. The blocks a may be welded or otherwise secured to the cover-plates 6, 7 shown in Figs. 2, 3 and el, which cover plates are thin plates preferably made of nickel, but which, of course, can be made of any other suitable material. Said cover plates are also preferably welded to the plates 1, 2 which, for this purpose are chamfered, as shown at 8 in Figs. 1 and 2, to provide space for the welding seam.

The last rib 3 at or near one end of each plate 1, 2 is preferably made shorter than the other ribs as clearly shown in Fig. 1, and in the remaining portion a channel 9 is provided for the passage of the material to be acted upon, said channel passing through the cooling device without communicating with the interior thereof. This channel 9 which is shown more clearly in the sectional view of Fig. 5, may be made in the shape of a truncated cone, two flanged tubular and frustoconical portions 10, 11 being pressed concentrically together in opposite relation to each other, and respectively attached to either of the two plates 1, 2.

In the modification of the cooling device shown in Figs. 6-8, the plates 12, 13 are provided with troughs formed by walls let which are pressed or stamped out from the metal of the plates 12, 13. These troughs also extend from one edge of each plate to near the opposite edge in alternating arrangement thus constituting a tortuous passage for the cooling medium, while at the same time imparting stiffness to the plates 12, 13. The latter, at their ends are bent off as shown at 15 in Fig. 7 to form spaces for the welding seams whereby the cover plates. 16, 17 are secured to the plates 12, 13. This is more clearly shown in the enlarged view of Fig. 9.

Near the periphery of the plates 12, 13, there is provided a frame 18, which, as shown in Figs. 10-12, may be made from pressed parts, such as channel shaped members 19 and suitable stiffening members 20. Said frame, as shown in Fig, 9 is likewise welded, or otherwise secured, to the plates 12, 13 along the edges thereof.

As shown in Figs. 6 and 7, an inlet opening 21 is provided at or near the one end of the cooling device for the cooling medium to enter the same, to pass beneath the cover plates in a sinuous path and to leave the device by an outlet opening 22 (Fig. 6) provided at or near the other end of the device. The ribs or walls of the cooling plates act as baflles to divert the flow of the cooling medium.

The hollow portions of frame 18 may be left empty, or they may be filled with any suitable material to facilitate heat exchange, and, of course, the frame may be constructed in any other way than shown in Figs. 1012.

The device as above described, while equally adaptable both for heating and cooling is more especially designed for cooling soap, fat, parafiin, chocolate, and the like as has been stated above.

A further modification of the device is disclosed in Figs. 13, 14 and 15. The cooling device as shown in said figures comprises two plates 23, 24, which along their edges are connected by a frame 25. Between the two plates which are preferably made from nickel plated steel sheet metal, are pressed or rolled parts 26 which form trough shaped members for the flow of the cooling medium and which are secured to the plates 23, 24. The channel for the passage of the material to be treated is shown at 27 in Fig. 13. At 28 is shown the inlet opening and at 29 the outlet opening for the cooling medium.

The members 26 may be secured to the plates 23,24 in any desired manner, but are preferably welded thereto, and the frame 25 is likewise preferably secured to the plates 23, 24v by welding.

Instead of the pressed or rolled member 26, also rolled or pressed corrugated sheet metal can be placed between the plates to form a passage for the cooling medium.

WVhile we have shown and described various embodiments of our invention, we do not, of course, limit ourselves to the said embodiments as our invention is capable of various constructions.

What we claim is 1. In a heat exchange device, a pair of plates arranged in spaced overlying relation with respect to one another, means enclosing the space between said plates, ribs extending from each plate into contact with the other plate, the ribs of each plate being disposed between and spaced from the ribs of the other plate, the ribs of one plate extending from one side of the device to points spaced inwardly from the other side of the device and the ribs of the other plate extending from the latter side of the device to points spaced inwardly from the first mentioned side of the device, thereby to provide a single continuous tortuous passage extending from end to end of the device.

2. In a heat exchange device, a pair of plates arranged in spaced overlying relation with respect to one another, means enclosing the space between said plates, ribs extending from each plate'into contact with the other plate, said ribs being formed by integral inwardly directed portions of the respective plates, the ribs of each plate being disposed between and spaced from the ribs of the other plate, the ribs of one plate extending from one side of the device to points spaced inwardly from the other side of the device and the ribs of the other plate extending from the latter side of the device to points spaced inwardly from the first mentioned side of the device, thereby to provide a single continuous tortuous passage extending from end to end of the device.

3. In a heat exchange device, a pair of plates arranged in spaced overlying relation with respect to one another, means enclosing the space between said plates, ribs extending from each plate into contact with the other plate, said ribs being formed by integral inwardly directed portions of the respective plates, the ribs of each plate being disposed between and spaced from the ribs of the other plate, the ribs of one plate extending from one side of the device to points spaced inwardly from the other side of the device and the ribs of the other plate extending from the latter side of the device to points spaced inwardly from the first mentioned side of the device, thereby to provide a single continuous tortuous passage extending from end to end of the device, and cover plates secured against the outer faces of said first mentioned plates, respectively.

4. In a heat exchange device, a pair of plates arranged in spaced overlying relation with respect to one another, means enclosing the space between said plates, hollow ribs of substantially U-shaped cross section pressed from each plate into contact with the other plate, the ribs of each plate being disposed between and spaced from the ribs of the other plate, the ribs of one plate extending from one side of the device to points spaced inwardly from the other side of the device and the ribs of the other plate extending from the latter side of the device to points spaced inwardly from the first mentioned side of the device, thereby to provide a single continuous tortuous passage extending from end to end of the device.

5. In a heat exchange device, a,pair of plates arranged in spaced overlying relation with respect to one another, means enclosing the space between said plates, hollow ribs of substantially U-shaped cross section pressed from each plate into contact with the other plate, the ribs of each plate being disposed between and spaced from the ribs of the other 5 plate, the ribs of one plate extending from one side of the device to points spaced inwardly from the other side of the device and the ribs of the other plate extending from the latter side of the device to points spaced inwardly from the first mentioned side of the device, thereby to provide a single continuous tortuous passage extending from end to end of the device, and cover plates secured against the outer faces of said first mentioned plates, respectively.

In testimony whereof we affix our signatures.

HERBERT FISCHER. LASAR GRODNITZKY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2521475 *Apr 15, 1948Sep 5, 1950Nickolas Arthur JFreezing section
US2573538 *Apr 10, 1947Oct 30, 1951Brown Fintube CoHeat exchanger conduit having internal fins
US2632633 *Dec 15, 1948Mar 24, 1953Air PreheaterPunched fin elements for heat exchangers
US2634958 *Dec 3, 1948Apr 14, 1953Modine Mfg CoHeat exchanger
US2638754 *Mar 2, 1949May 19, 1953Dole Refrigerating CoRefrigerant plate
US2650077 *Jun 8, 1951Aug 25, 1953Air PreheaterHeat exchanger envelope comprising assembled channels and plates
US2782010 *Dec 18, 1948Feb 19, 1957Modine Mfg CoHeat exchanger
US2804285 *Sep 10, 1952Aug 27, 1957Air PreheaterHeat exchanger formed of channel members
US2886101 *Dec 31, 1952May 12, 1959Overton GlenApron for drum driers
US2999305 *Dec 27, 1955Sep 12, 1961Reynolds Metals CoSpiral heat exchanger
US3019775 *Jun 30, 1958Feb 6, 1962Blaw Knox CoClosure member or the like
US4509592 *Aug 3, 1979Apr 9, 1985Hisaka Works, Ltd.Plate type evaporator
US5152337 *Sep 12, 1991Oct 6, 1992Honda Giken KogyoStack type evaporator
US5339892 *Dec 17, 1992Aug 23, 1994Apv Corporation LimitedHeat exchange device
US7011142Feb 25, 2003Mar 14, 2006Dana Canada CorporationFinned plate heat exchanger
US7025127 *Jul 2, 2003Apr 11, 2006Dana Canada CorporationBaffled surface cooled heat exchanger
US7182125Nov 28, 2003Feb 27, 2007Dana Canada CorporationLow profile heat exchanger with notched turbulizer
US7213638Apr 9, 2004May 8, 2007Dana Canada CorporationHeat exchanger with flow circuiting end caps
US8276654 *Nov 17, 2005Oct 2, 2012Hamilton Sundstrand CorporationCore assembly with deformation preventing features
EP2306130A2 *Sep 22, 2010Apr 6, 2011Tec-Sim S.r.l.Plate for freeze drying machines
WO1995031686A1 *May 12, 1995Nov 23, 1995Apv Corp LtdHeat exchange device
Classifications
U.S. Classification165/170, 38/137
International ClassificationF28F3/12, F28F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationF28F3/12
European ClassificationF28F3/12