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Publication numberUS1778181 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 14, 1930
Filing dateJun 24, 1924
Priority dateJun 24, 1924
Publication numberUS 1778181 A, US 1778181A, US-A-1778181, US1778181 A, US1778181A
InventorsBrinkman Louis H
Original AssigneeBrinkman Louis H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for forming tapered tubes
US 1778181 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct.- 14, 1936.

L. H. BRINKMAN APPARATUS oR FORMING TAPERED TUBES Filed June 24',r 1924 @sheets-sheet Oct. 14, 1930. 1 H. BRINKMAN APPARATUS FOR FORMING TAPERED TUBES Filed June 24, 1924 6 Sheets-Sheet .3

INVENTOR Oct. 14, 1930. L. H. BRINKMAN APPARATUS FOR FORMING TAPERED TUBES Filed June 24, `1924 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR Oct. 14, 1930.

L. H. BRINKMAN 1,778,181

APPARATUS FOR FORMING TAPERED TUBES 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed June 24, 192g L INVENTOR 0ct. 14, 1930. L. H. BRINKMA 1,773,181

' Y APPARATUS FOR FO'RMING TAPEED TUBES Filed June 24, 1%,2'4 6 sheets-sheet 6 lll Il "31. K

` BY /ZvZu-AEQATIORNEY `Patented Oct. 14, 1930 LOUIS H. BRINXMAN, F GLEN RIDGE, NEW JERSEY A PPABAZD'IUS FOR FOBMING TAPERED TULBES Application led Ju'ne 24,

This invention' relates to the forming of tubes, especially thin tubes of varying diameters, which are adapted for use as the shafts of golf clubs but may be employed in other I uses to which they are adapted; the invention also relates to the improved golf clubs, `the shafts of which may be formed by this invention.

Metal tubes form a light, durable and l0 strong shaft for golf clubs but heretofore it has not been proposed to provide such tubular shafts with walls of varying thickness or in varying the tube diameter to provide the desired feel of the clubincluding flexibility and strength distributed at desired points. Thus it is desirable that the shaft should be of minimum diameter so as to provide greatest flexibility a few inches from the head of the club and also the end of the shaft where it joins the head should be larger so as to provide strength in securing to the head and also to loca-te the flexibility in an appropriate position lengthwise of the shaft. Also in order to properly distribute the strength of the shaft throughout its length the tube wall should be made of varying thickness. N o such metal tubular shaft for a golf club has ever before been provided so far as I am aware and other characteristics of golf clubs 359 according to this invention will appear from the appended description in connection with the accompanying drawings.

It may, therefore, be said to be an important object of the invention to provide golf 55 clubs with tubular metal shafts having characteristics as indicated herein.

v A further object of the invention is to provide apparatus for forming metal tubes to be used as golf club shafts or in other applica- 4i tions to which they may be adapted. A further object of the invention is to provide a method for forming metal tubes as indicated.

Other and ancillary objectsl of the inven- 'tion will appear hereinafter.

In the accompanying drawings which illustrate the invention v Fig. 1 is a side elevation of a machine embodying the invention; 1

Fig. 2 is a longitudinal section on an en- 1924. Serial No. 721,965.

larged scale, partly broken away, of a. portion of the apparatus shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a section on the line 3-3 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a section on the line 4 4 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 5 is a section on the line 5 5 of Fig. 2; 55

Fig. 6 is a longitudinal section partl broken away and some of the parts remove of a machine similar to that shown in Fig. 2 but havinga modified form of mandrel.

Fig. 7 isa sectional view, on an enlarged 60 scale, with parts broken away and omitted showing a modified form of die and mandrel for use in a machine as shown in Fig. 2;

Fig. 8 is a side elevation of a shaft for a golf club;

Fig. 9 is a view, showing the shaft in section, of a golf club with a shaft as shown in Fig. l0 is a longitudinal section, on an enlarged scale, of a machine as indicated in connection with Fig. 6, but with a modified form of mandrel and die;

Fig. 11 is a view of a golf club showing the shaft in longitudinal section;

Fig. 12 is a longitudinal section of a modi- 75 fied form of die for use in a machine as shown in Fig. 2 whereby the shaft as shown in Fig.

11 may be made;

Fig. 13 is a longitudinal section ofparts of a die and mandrel showing forms of those devices whereby the shaft formed by the dies and mandrels of Figs. 12 and 13, may be finished in a machine `of the Character as shown in Fig. 6;

Fig. 14 is a view of a golf club, the shaft 85 being shown in section;

Fig.. 15 is a longitudinal section of a portion of a machine so modified from that form as shown in Fig. 2 asto be adapted to form the shaft as shown in Fig. 14;

Fig. 16 is a section on the line 16-16 of Fig. 15;

Fig. 17 isa longitudinal sectional view of a machine with parts broken away indicat- 95 ing a modified construction of the machine as shown in Fig. 6, whereby the shaft as initially manufactured in the machine as shown in Fig. l5 may be finished.

Fig. 18 is a fragmentary view partly in 100 and its cooperating mandrel, with parts broken away, whereby the shaft of Fig. 19 may be finished, this die and mandrel being employed in a machine as shown in Fig.A 6.

Referring to the drawings and first to Figs. 1 to 5 inclusive which show a means for drawing a taperingtube of uniform wall thickness, the apparatus comprises a frame 1 which may be similar to the usual lathe frame having a bed 2' similar to the usualw lathe bed upon which slides the-tapering die having a frame 3 and engaging with a feed screw 4 rotatably mounted in the frame and driven by means of gears 5 .and 6 from the pulley wheels 7 driven by a belt 8 adapted to be shipped between reversely rotating pulleys on a drive shaft as is a common expedient in lathe practice, to reverse the rotation of the feed screw 4.

Mounted at one end ofthe frame is a stationary drawhead comprising the frame 9 fixed to the frame by means of lag screws such as 10 and 11. lRotatably mounted in the frame 9 is a chuck member 12 to which is securedthe end of the tube 13 to be tapered, the end of the tube being entered within a socket 14 in the chuck member and surrounding a rod 16 having; a tapered head 17 engaging inclined ends of the chuck jaws and adapted when drawn to the right (Fig. 2) to force the chuck jaws outwardly and .grip the tube against the walls of the socket 1.4. When the head is moved in the other direction the pressure on the chuck jaws is relieved andthe tube may be withdrawn. The rod 16 lextends through a bushing or sleeve 18 fixed k1n the member 12 and at its end is provided with a screw-thread 19 with which is engaged a hand wheel 20. It will be seen that the hand wheel 20, coming against the end of the bushing 18, when turned in one direction will expand the chuck jaws 15, and when turned in the other direction the pressure upon the jaws will be relieved. l; ixed to the chuck member 12 is a driving pulley 21 which may be provided with sprocket teeth 22 kfor engagement with the driving chain or may be a smooth pulley for cooperation with a belt. A roller bearing 23 between the pulley 21 and the frame 9 takes the thrust upon the chuck member occasioned by the pull upon the tube being operated upon Fixed in the frame 9 are nuts 24 and 25 through which respectively work the screws 26 and 27 which are rotatably mounted at 28 and 29 in the frame of the die head. These screws are prevented from sliding endwise with relation to the die head by means of shoulders 30 and 31 on the screw 26 and 32 and 33 on the screw 27. T he members upon which the screws 26 and 27 are formed, extending beyond'the die frame 3 are provided respectively with screw threads 34fand 35 whereby they engage with `the ball adjusting head 36 which is carried by these screw Imembers.l

Rotatably mounted within the head 36 by means of` ball bearings 37 is the sleeve 38 constituting a cage for the balls 39. The sleeve 38 is provided with holes as shown in each of lwhich is located a ball. Each of these holes is of considerably greater diameter than the ball it contains so that there is considerable clearance about the ball and it may readily find its own seat without binding. v Preferably the thickness of the ball ca e, at the point where the balls are held, is a out onehalf the diameter of the balls. The balls are enclosed within a hard steel die 4() -secured in the frame 3 by means of a ring 41 screwed into the frame 3 and thereby the die is secured firmly to that frame. The die is provided with a central recess of circular section, the walls of such recess against which the balls bear being tapered longitudinally of the apparatus or otherwise formed to guide the balls to produce the desired conformation ofthe tub e. rllhus in the apparatus as shown in Fig. 2 longitudinal movement of the ball cage 38 whereby the 'balls are moved over the cylindrical portion 42 ofthe die walls will result iny a uniform diameter of the tube whereas a similar movement of the ball cage when the balls are in contact with the tapered or inclined wall 43 of the die' will cause the balls to be moved inwardly or outwardly according to the direction of movement of `the cage and a corresponding change'in .the exterior diameter of the tube will be effected.

Within the tube 13 and into the recess of the die extends a mandrel 44 which is inl screw- .threaded engagement with a thrust collar 45 4The longitudinal thrust upon the -mandrel 44 is takenv by ball bearings 48 and 49 between the thrust collar and the yoke 47. This mandrel extends under the balls and provides a support for the tube being drawn at the point .where it is drawn under the balls and also by occupying a definite relationship with relation to the interior of the wall of the die upon which the balls move,. deines the thickness v of the tube. It will be apparent that the outsidediameter of the tube under the walls will be defined Aby Ithe balls, while the inside diamiev eter will be delined by the kdiameter under the Aballs and the thickness of the tube will be the mandrel where it extends into the recess.

in the dye is substantially parallel to an element of the die Walls surrounding the mandrel. The drawn tube is. thus of uniform thickness but as the ball cage is moved longitudinally the outside diameter of the tube is varied. In order to lubricate the balls, a suitable lubricant may be introduced through a pipe 50 from any suitable source of supply and dropped upon the ball cage along which it will travel to the balls.

I It will be apparent that the taper of the tube will depend upon the inclination of the die faces with which the balls engage and the rate at which the ball cage is moved longitudinally relative to the travel of the die head.

It will be seen that the ball cage 38 moves back and forth with the ball adjusting head yse '35. The last mentioned screws have their threads cut in such direction that as the die head moves to the left the ball adjusting head 36 will move to the right (closer to the die head 3) and the balls will be movedy longitudinally toward the right (Fig. 2). The threads 34|and 35 are of such pitch that the balls will be thus moved longitudinally at the desired speed'with relation to the movement of the die head.. It is convenient .in many cases for the ball adjusting head 36 to move longitudinally with relation to the die head at one-tenth of the speed of movement of the die head with'relation to the bed of the lathe.

In operating-the apparatus of Fig. -2 the.

drawhead having been moved to the left by manipulating the'feed screw or discngaging the die head from that screw by the use of a split nut, usual in vlathepractice, and the chuck members 15 being loosened b unscrewing the feed wheel 20 and moving t e head 17 to the left', one end of the tube to be drawn, which may be a tube of uniform diameter or of a taper or other shape lwhich it is desired to modify has one end entered within the die beneath the balls and around the mandrel and is ushed to the left until its end may be entered) within the socket '14 of the chuck member when it may have its end entered within that socket and clamped in the chuck member by means of the rod 16 and 'hand wheel 20 in the manner ,as before described.

The drawhead is then moved to the right in proximity to the 'chuck vand thrown into paratus then being set in operation the chuck head will be rotated by the wheel 21 and the die head will be carried to the left by the feed Screw, the ball adjusting head 36 bein moved toward the die head.y` So long as t e balls remain within the surface 42 there will be no change in the diameter of the tube, but as soon as the balls enter within the inclined or conical surface 43 they will be forced inwardly thereby decreasing the diameter of the tube which will continue until the end of the tapering operation is reached. The tube, bein fixed in the drawhead, is drawn between t e balls as through a die orifice and at 'all times the tube is supported by the interior, mandrel which defines the thickness of the tube wall and supports it against collapsing which is of Great im portance in connection with thin tiibes as the tube is prevented from collapsing under the pressure caused by big reduction. VIt is thus often made possible to affect all the taper desired in the tube by a single draw, and Where the Wall of the tube is comparativel thin and weak as for instance in the manu acture of tubular metal shafts for golfclubs.

It will be seen that the tube drawn is lrotated by the rotation of the chuck to which it is secured and thus causes the balls 39 to rotate and roll about on the tube and against the die surface thereby working and forging the metal down to the desired form so that it is of superior uality after being drawn.

In thus rotating a out the die the balls carry with them the ball ca e 38 which rotates easily upon its ball caring. Also, the mandrel being rotatably mounted ma turn with the tube so as not to produce bin 'ng orA friction.

The tapered tube as thus formed may be suitable for many uses without further treat- `ment but it will be noted that the tube 13in the apparatus of Fi ..2 is subjected, between the action necessar the die head. 'll strains ldeleterious to some uses of `the tube, this being especially true in relation to devices such as the shafts of golf clubs -where it is necessary that the shaft should be straight and true without distorting stresses or strams. To accomplished the results indicated the tube may be given a further treatment whereby the objectionable stresses and strains are removed.I This may be accomplished by takin the tube as taperedl by means of a large re uction per draw 'in the machine of Fig. 2 and placing it in another machine the same as Fig. 2 except that there is amandrel within the tube upon which it is yrolled down. Such mandrel extends the length of the tube rawhead and ie head, to the twisting to turn it, the balls etc. in

,and upon it the metal is vkneaded, breaking up the stresses and strains, and the mandrel reenforces the tube 'nst the torsional strain so thatwhen. alight reduction of .the

his may develop stresses and` of Figs. 1 to 5 inclusive.

vltube is taken in this manner there will be produced a tube of the desired taper and free from objectionable stresses and strains.

Thus in Fig. 6 the tube 13 taken from the machine of Fig. 2 is placed in another machine similar in all particulars except that .the mandrel 51 is fixed to the chuck operating head 17 and extends the whole length of the tube beneath the balls 39 positioned by means of the ball cage 38 within the die 40, all as described in connection with the apparatus 'The tube 13 is fixed in the chuck member 12 as previously described so that when the chuck is rotated the mandrel 51 and tube 13 rotate together. The die head having been placed at the right (adjacent the drawhead,

the die will be moved to the left (Fig. 6)- by the feed screw and the tube will be drawn through the die, a light reduction being given by the balls in a manner as described in con-l formity and accuracy are required as in the shafts of golf clubs.

A golf stick shaft as shown in side eleva- `tion in Fig.` 8 and in section in Fig. 9 may be made b the employment of a machine as shown in ig. 2 but with a modified form of mandrel as shown in Fig. 7, the die having the inclined face 52 and-the cylindrical face 53, the mandrel 44 being provided with l corresponding inclined faces 54 and cylindrical portion 55. The operation of the machine as described will then produce a tube having a substantially uniform thickness of v wall and tapering throughout the greater part of its length, but having`a short section at its end of uniform diameter.

thus formed is then placed in a machine the same as Fig. 2 but with the mandrel arrangement similar to that' shown in Fig. 6, the specific form of mandrel and die being shown in Fig. 10 wherein the mandrel secured to the clutch member and extending the full length of the tube to be finished, comprises the tapered portion 56 and the portion L57 of uniform diameter. The die in which the balls are located has. the ball engaging surfaces comprising the inclined surface 58 of a taper suitable to cause the tube 59 to be rolled down upon the mandrel as the die is moved along the tube and the balls 39 shifted to the right by means 'of the cage 38,`and also the cylin drical surface 58 adapted to guide the balls in rolling the portion 62v of the tube upon the The tubey cylindrical portion of the mandrel. A light rolling' having been accomplished upon the full length mandrel, a true and accurate golf club shaft free from objectionable stress and strains and of a form as shown in side elevation in Fig. 8 and 1n longitudinal section 1n Fig. 9 is produced. This golf shaft, it will be seen, includes the tapered section 56 extending for the greater portion of the length of the shaft to the point 61 and thence to the ,end is the section 57 of uniform diameter (the whole shaft being of uniform thickness of wall) adapted to receive the shank 63 of the head 64 of a golf club, the two being secured together in any suitable manner. f

' The golfclub shaft as shown in Fig. 11

having a tapered tube of uniform thickness of wall for the section 65 which extends for the greater portion of its length and terminating. at the narrowest portion 66 and thence having the section 67 of uniform internal diameter but of increasing external diameter (the tube increasing in thickness) to a point 68 whence the tube shaft extends with uniform thickness of wall and uniform diameter of tube to its end, may be formed with a modified form of die as shown in Fig. 12, the

mandrel being tapered and having a cylindrical end as shown in Fig. 7. In Fig. 12 the die is modified from that shown in Fig. 7 in that While the face 69 is tapered in the same manner as is the face 52, the face of the ydie corresponding to 53 of Fig. 7 is formed of the portion 70 which increases in diameter from left to right and the section 71 of the face which is cylindrical. It will be seen that with this apparatus the tube will have a wall of uniform thickness (being thatvin the uniform clearance between the balls and` mandrel under the die faoe 69 through the section 65). When the inclined section 70 is encountered by the balls they will be permitted to vgradually move radiall outward and, the corresponding portion o the many drel being cylindrical the tube wall will become thicker (the inside diameter of the tube remaining the same) so that there will be a taper at the outside wall 'of the tube and upon reaching the face section 71 of the die,

the tube will bemaintained of uniform diam- I eter, but with the thicker wall, to the end of the tube. The tube thus jformed may be placed upon a mandrel extending the full length of the tube as indicated in Fig. 13. This mandrel being secured to the tube securing chuck in the drawhead as described in connection with Fig.6 and extending' b'eneath the balls as indicated. This mandrel comprises'the tapered portion 72 extending throughout the length- 65 of the shaft and the cylindrical portion 73 extending within the section from the point 66 to the end of thetube and this is then passed through a die 74 in a machine like that shown in Fig. 2 but with the modied mandrel arrangement referred to. This die .7 4 had the inclined portion 75 corresponding to the portion 69 of Fig. 12, the inclined portion 76 corresponding to the portion 7 0 of Fig. 12 and the cylindrical portion 77 corresponding to the portion 71 of Fig. 12. The shaft having been finished upon this last device the finished article is as shown in Fig. 11.

It is to be observed in connection with the shaft of Fig. 11 that the point 66 is thatl of the least outside diameter of the tube, the shaft being of greater outside diameter upon both sides of that point. This affords a means for decreasing the size of the shaft adjacent the head, or wherever desired so as to give suitable flexibility at desired points of the shaft.

In order to produce a shaft as shown in F ig. 14, namely having one of uniform thickness of wall throughout but having a tapered section 78 extending throughout the greater part of its length to a point of minimum diameter 79 and thence tapering oppositely through a section 80 to a point 81 and thence being of cylindrical section 82 to the end of the shaft, may be formed by means of a ma` chine now to be described.

Referring to Figs. 15 and 16, the apparatus comprises a diehead 3 and die, a mandrel 44, a drawhead frame 9, a' rotatable chuck 12 in which is secured the tube 13 to be drawn and the ball adjusting head 36, all as described in connection with the apparatus of Fig. 2 and related figures. The means for shifting the ball adjusting head 36, however, is diiferent, provision being made for the shifting of the balls in opposite directions, to produce reverse ta ers on the tube being drawn. The means or accomplishing this will now be described.

The rods 83 and 84 rotatably mounted in the die head are provided with screw threads 34 'and 35 engaging with thedie adjusting head 36'- in the same manner as described in connect-ion with the apparatus of Fig. 2. These rods, however, are provided at one part with parallel helical grooves 85 of low pitch, these grooves being 18()o apart about the rod. These grooves run into another pair of parallel grooves 86, of steeper pitch than the grooves 85, at 87, the grooves 85 and 86 being helically formed about the rod so that the rod is substantially right-handedly threaded byv one pair of grooves and left-handedly threaded by the other pair.

' It will be seen that each of the grooves of the pair 85 and one of the pair 86 form one continuous groove and within each of these grooves enters an anti-friction' roller 88 rotatably mounted on a stud 89 fixed in the nut or bushing 90 which is itself adjustably xed in the frame 9. Itwill now be seen that as the die head is'moved b the feed screw in relation to the drawhea the rotatable rods 83 and 84 will be drawn through the nuts in grooves is of long pitch and the parts are so proportioned that the balls will be moved to the right against the tapering die face 7 8 to form the taper over the greater length 78 of the tube. When the point 79 of minimum diameter has been reached the studs 89 will have reached the points 87 and, entering uponA the grooves 86 will cause the rods 83 and 84 to be turned in the opposite-direction, thereby reversing the turning of the screw threads 34'- and 35 and moving the ball adjustin die in the other direction, i. e. toward the le t in Fig. 15. The inte-rior face of the die now grows larger as the balls are retracted toward the left so that the diameter of the tube increases to form the reversely tapering portion` 80, It is to be observed, however, that the taper 80 involves a given Variation in diameter over a much shorter length of tube than is the case with the part 78. As has been noted, however, the pitch of the grooves 86 is much steeper than that of the grooves 85 so that the retraction of the-ball adjusting head toward the left (Fio. 15) is much more rapid than the travel of the balls toward the right during the tapering of the parts 78. Having reached the cylindrical portion 91 of the die face, the balls will travel toward the left rapidly but with a substantially uniform diameter of tube so that the part 82 is formed.

This may then be finished by placing it in a machine as shown and described in connection with Fig. 15 but with the long mandrel as shown in Figs. 17 and 18. The'tapered mandrel 92 in those figures is secured to and extends from the chuck to the least diameter 7 9 of the tube and has screwed into the end of it a rever-sely tapering plug 93 substantially corresponding to the tapered portion 80 of the tube. This plug has a screwthreaded plug 94 engaging in a tapped hole 95 in the mandrel '92 and has a kerf 96 in its end whereby this plug may be unscrewed from the end of the mandrel to permit the tube to be placedon the mandrel or removed therefrom. The threads on the parts 94 and 95 should be of such direction that the tendency during the operation upon the tube will be to screw up the plug rather than to unscrew it so that the plug may not becomey accidentally detached from the mandrel during the operation of the machine. The constructlon and movement of the die and shifting of the balls in reverse directions to follow the desired form of the tube is the same as described and shown in connection with Fig. 15. In fact the machines may be the same except for the difference in mandrels as indicated.

It is sometimes advantageousthat, a golf thickened at the waist or portion of least diameter so that while flexibility of the shaft is obtained at that point the club shaft may be strengthened. The club as shown in Fig. 19 comprises the portion 110 having a long taper, the wall of the tube being of substantially uniform diameter throughout the greater portion of its length. This portion 110 extends to the waist 97 whence the revervsely tapered portion 98 extends to the substantially cylindrical portion 99 joined to the head 100 of the club. It will be observed that the wall of the tube is thickened at 97, the wall then tapering in both directions to a thinner wall which obtains throughout the greater portion of the tube. This shaft has advantages as st-ated and may be produced upon the machine as shown in Fig. 15 by modifying the form of the mandrel as shown in Fig. 20. The-face of the die remaining the same as in Fig. 15, the mandrel is hollowed out or concaved at 101 near the point of the mandrel so that as the balls approach yand -leave their points of minimum diameter of the tube there will be a clearance between the mandrel and balls increased over such clearance during the major portion of the length of the shaft and` consequently the walls will be thicker in that region, the thickness of the wall tapering ofi' from the maximum thickness at the waist or minimum diameter of the tube, in both directions.

The tube thus formed may be finished upon along mandrel and with a die as shown in Fig. 21, wherein is indicated the mandrel section 102 tapering so as to conform to the desired interior of the part 110 of the golf club shaft, and screwed into the end of the mandrel 102 is a reversely tapered plug 103 corresponding to the parts 98 and 99 of the club shaft. This long mandrel and plug being secured together and to the tube holding chuckas shown and described in connection with Figs. 17 and 18. In rolling the shaft down on the mandrel the balls are shifted always toward the right during the tube forming operation in the same manner as in Figs. 2 and 6. The balls first pass along the inclined die surface 104 in rolling the long taper 110 and then pass along the substantially cylindrical die surface 105 whereby increased clearance between the balls and the mandrel to accommodate the thickening of the tube wall is provided. The lballs then pass along the reversely inclined surface 106 of the dle during which the reversely tapered portion 98 is rolled and then, entering upon the cylindrical die face 107 the cylindrical portion 99 of the golf shaft is rolled. Y

It will be observed from the foregoing that by suitably shaping and proportioning the die and the mandrel any desired amount and direction of taper of a tube may be obtained at any desired portion of its length and this with regard to either or both t-he diameter of the tube and thickness of its wall. l

The advantage of employing a device with an arrangement land construction of mandrel as shown in Figs. 2, 15 and other figures and then finishing upon'a machine having a long mandrel like Figs. 6, I7 and others is that a larger reduct-ion per draw may be accomplished on the former while with the latter the characteristics of the tube are improved as before explained. Where, however, the characteristics of thetube as produced by the former are not objectionable in the use'to which they are to be put, the tube may be completed on the former machine and the finishing on the lat'- ter machine be dispensed with. Also if conditions are such that the larger reduction afforded by the first machine is not desirable the entire tapering operation upon the ltube may be carried out upon the latter machine.

While the invention `has been described in what is considered its best application it may have other embodiments without departing from its spirit and is not therefore' limited to the structures shown in the drawlngs.

What I claim is 1. Apparatus for forming tubes of varying diameter comprising in combination a drawhead, a die through which the tube is drawn having an orifice of variable diameter and a mandrel extending within the orifice and adapted to support the tube as it is drawn through the orifice, means for relatively moving said die and drawhead, means for varying the diameter of the mandrel at the drawing section and means for varying the diamter of the die in predetermined relation to the relative movement of the said die and drawhead.

2. Apparatus for forming tubes of 'varyf l ing diameter comprising in 'combination al drawhead, a die through which the tube is drawn having an orifice of variable diameter and a mandrel extending within the orifice and adapted to support the tube as it isdrawn through the orifice, means forrelatively mov-- ing said die and drawhead, means vfor varying the diameter of the mandrel at the drawing section, means for varying the diameter` of the die in predetermined relation to the relative movement of the said die and drawhead, and means for maintaining said mandrel in operative relation to said die.

3. Apparatus for forming tubes of vary'- ing diameter comprising in combination a drawhead, a die through which the tube is drawn having an orifice of variable diameter* and a mandrel extending within the orifice and adapted to support the tube as it is drawn through the orifice, means for relatively moving said die'and drawhead and means for varying the diameter ofthe die in predetermined-relation to the relative movement of the'saidl die and drawhead, and a common means for operating said mandrel' and die.

4. Apparatus for forming tubes of-varying diameter comprising in combination a drawhead, a die through which the tube -is drawn having an orifice of variable diameter and a mandrel extending within the, orifice and adapted to sup ort the tube as it is drawn through the ori ce, means for relatively moving said die and drawhead and means for varying the ldiameter of the die in predetermined relation .to the relative movement of the said die `and drawhead, and common means forincreasin and decreasing thevdiameter'of the die and for operating the mandrel:

5. Apparatus for forming tubes of varying diameter comprisin in combination a drawhead, a die .throug which the tube is drawn having'an orifice of variable diameter and a mandrel extending within the orifice and adapted to support the tube as it is drawn through the orifice, means for relatively moving said die and drawhead and means for varying the diameter of the die in predetermined relation to `the relative movement of the said die and drawhead and a common means for relatively moving the drawhead Aand die, varying the diameter of the die orifice through which the tube is'drawn and moving "the mandrel in o erativ'e relation to the die.

6. Apparatus or forming tubes of varying` diameter'com risin lin combination a drawhead, a die. t roug which the tube is drawn having an orifice of-variable diameter and a mandrel ,extending within the orifice and adapted to support`the tube as it is drawn throu h the orifice, the working members of said lie being rotating bodies, means for varying the diameter of the mandrel at the drawin section and means for relatively rotating t e die and tube being drawn.

- 7. Apparatus for forming tubes of varying diameter comprising in combination a drawhead, a die through which the tube is drawn having an orifice of variable diameter, a -mandrel extending within the4 Vorifice and adapted'to support the tube as it is drawn through the ori ce, the. working members of said die being rotating bodies, means for relatively rotatingl the die and tube being drawn and a carriage for said rotating bodies, said carriage freely rotating under the action of said bodies. v

u 8. Apparatus 'for forming tubes of varying diameter comprising in combination a draw- -head,-a die through which the tube is drawn having anoriice ofvvariable diameter, a mandrel extending within said orice and adapted to support the tube as it is drawn throu h the orifice, the working members of said ie \being rotating bodies, means for relatively rotating the die and tube being drawn, a carriage for said rotating bodies, said carria e freely rotating under the action of sald bodies, and meansfor'causing relative movement'of said carriage and die to shift the said bodies axially of the tube with relation to said die. d

9. 'Apparatus for forming reversely tapered tube comprising in combination a drawhead, a die having an orifice of variable diameter, a mandrel extending `within said orifice and adapted to support the tube being drawn and means for alternately decreasing and increasing the'diameter of said orifice in predetermined relation to the position of the l die with relation to the drawhead.

10. Apparatus for `forming reversely tapered tube of variable wall thickness, comprising in combination a drawhead a die having an orifice of variable diameter, a mandrel extending within the 'orificeand adapted to support the tube being drawn and means for alternately decreasing and increasing the diameter of said orifice and varying the clearance betwen said mandrel and die at the drawing section, iny predetermined relation to the lposzion of the die with relation to the draw- 11. Apparatus for forming tubes of varying diameter comprising in combination a drawhead, a die through which the tube is drawn having an orifice of variable diameter ing within the orifice and adapted to support the tube as it is drawn through the means `for relatively moving said die an drawhead, means for varying the diameter of the mandrel at the drawing section in predetermined relation to the relative movement of said die and drawhead.

12. Apparatus for forming tubes of varying diameter. comprising in combination aydrawhead, a die through which the tube is drawn having an orifice of variable diameter and a mandrel of variable diameter extend ing diameter comprising in combination a drawhead, a die through which the tube is drawn having an orifice of variable diameter and a mandrel of variable diameter extending within the orifice and adapted to support the tube as it is drawn through the orifice, means for relatively moving said die and drawhead, means for 4varying the diameter of and a mandrel of variable diameter extendorifice the mandrel at the drawing section in 'predetermined relation to the diameter of the die,

the diameter of the mandrel at the drawing section decreasing as the diameter of the orifce decreases.

14. Apparatus for forming tubes of varying diameters comprising in combination a drawhead, a die' through which the tube is drawn having an orifice of variable diameter, a mandrel of variable diameter extending within the orifice and adapted to support the tube as it is drawn through the orifice, means for relatively moving said die and drawhead, means for varying the diameter of the mandrel at the drawing section, and means for varying the diameter of the die, the diameter of the mandrel at the drawing section and the diameter of the die being varied in predetermined relation to each other and to the lrelative movement of the die and drawhead.

In testimony whereof I have signed this specification this fourteenth day of June,

LOUIS H. BRINKMAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3662578 *Jun 28, 1968May 16, 1972Gen ElectricTurbulence promoter formation
US3727445 *Aug 24, 1970Apr 17, 1973Ashtabula Bow Socket CoMethod and appatatus for forming a blank
US3874208 *Sep 7, 1973Apr 1, 1975Werner John ASpinning adapter
US3930394 *Jul 22, 1974Jan 6, 1976Pavel Ivanovich OrroMill for plugging tubes and taking them off plug
US4961576 *Nov 23, 1988Oct 9, 1990Sandvik Special Metals CorporationConstant wall shaft with reinforced tip
US5074555 *Apr 24, 1989Dec 24, 1991Sandvik Special Metals Corp.Tapered wall shaft with reinforced tip
US5853272 *May 16, 1997Dec 29, 1998Continental Industries, Inc.Plastic pipe end forming tool
US5935017 *Jun 28, 1996Aug 10, 1999Cobra Golf IncorporatedGolf club shaft
US6117021 *Dec 24, 1997Sep 12, 2000Cobra Golf, IncorporatedGolf club shaft
US6146291 *Aug 16, 1997Nov 14, 2000Nydigger; James D.Baseball bat having a tunable shaft
Classifications
U.S. Classification72/75, 72/96, 473/321
International ClassificationB21C37/15, B21C37/18
Cooperative ClassificationB21C37/18
European ClassificationB21C37/18