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Publication numberUS1780774 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 4, 1930
Filing dateNov 9, 1928
Priority dateNov 9, 1928
Publication numberUS 1780774 A, US 1780774A, US-A-1780774, US1780774 A, US1780774A
InventorsWhite Ezekiel F
Original AssigneeGrover V Lassen
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Separator
US 1780774 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E- F- WHITE Nov. 4, 1930.

SEPARATOR Filed Nov. 9, 1928 Panarea Nav. 4, 1930 UNITED STATES PATENT: OFFICE EZEKIEL F. WHITE, OF HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT, ASSIGNOR TO GROVER V. LAAS'SEN,

' 0F WEST HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT sErARAToR Application med 'november 9, 1928.' serial No. 318,257.

This invention relates to separators for separating impurities from a stream of liquid, the same being embodied herein, for illustrative purposes, in a sep-` arator intended more particularly for purifying oil such as is used foroil burners, 1nternal combustion engines,or the like. The object of the invention is to providetan nn-Y proved, etlicient and durable separator, simple and inexpensive in its mechanical construction.

The invention will be best understood by reference to the following description, when taken in connection with the accompanylng illustration of one specitic embodiment thereof, while its scope will be more particularly pointed out inthe appended claims.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a side elevation of the separator 2o embodying one form of the invention; and

Fig. 2 is a central, sectional elevation taken on the line 2 2 in Fig. 1.

Referring to the drawingsv and to the form of the invention there shown for illustrative purposes, the same comprises an outer cylindrical, cup-like casing 3 having the bottom closure 5 and open at its upper or opposite end where it is provided with a beaded or turned-over edge 7 to constitute a bearing surface contacting with a gasket 9 of suitable yieldable material, such as prepared paper or lother suitable packing.

The open upper end of the outer casing 1s closed by the cap piece or cover 1l having a shoulder or rim 13 adapted to bear against the gasket 9, the .cap being provided o n its top with oppositely extending ribs 15 (Fig. 1)

y terminating in lugs 17 which project beyond the edges 7 of the casing 3. To hold the parts y in assembled position, there is provided a generally U-shaped clamp comprising the bent rod 19 extending beneath and bearin in a groove 21 formed in the bottom of the casing.A The opposite ends or legs of the clamping rod pass through the lugs 17 and yhave threaded engagement with the clamping nuts 23.

v This provides a cheap and inexpensive but: elicient clamping` connect-ion by which the parts may be readily assembled in tight titspace in a ting relation, but may also bereadily disassembledby merely unclamping the cap from the casing so that the latter may be removed for purposes of cleaning the interior parts, or for repairs.

Contained within the cap piece are suitable passages for the oil or other liquid to be purified, the same comprising an inlet passage 25 and an oppositely disposed outlet passage 27, both being internally threaded to adapt them for connection to suitable inlet and outlet pipes. The inlet passage 25 communic'ates with a passage 29 formed in a depending thimble 31, the thimble having'an outlet 33 communicating with the interior space of the casing 3 and opening into the generally tangential' direction so that the fluid delivered therethrough vhas imparted thereto through contact with the walls of the casing a rotary or swirling motion in a helical path.

The circulation of the fluid after delivery to the casing is caused to be confined to an annular circulating space 35 formed between the inner'walls of the casing 3 and the outer walls of an inner cylindrical-cup-like shield 37 of substantially lesser diameter than the casing, the shield extending with its open end down well into the casing, so that the fiuid is caused to pass down through the annular circulating space by the aforesaid whirling or rotary movement before it may enter the lower open end of the shield.

The upper end ofthe shield has an end closure plate 39 secured thereto, the plate having an inner depending central stem 41 and an outwardly or upwardly protruding threaded lug 43 which is pipe-threaded into the depending lug 45 on the cap piece 11. The

space within the shield communicates with the delivery passage 27 through lateral passages 47 formed in the depending stem and through the communicating central passages 49 and 51 formed respectively in the protrudsoA of the screen is flattened to abut against the inside of the clamping block and is perforatedlto permit the passage of the clamping screw.

In operation the oil or other fluid is caused to pass through the separator under any suitable impelling force, either suction or pressure, and, entering the inlet passage 25, is discharged through the opening 33 into the annular circulating space where it passes toward the bottomof the shield in a helical path. Through the action of centrifugal force and gravity this te'ndsto separate from the fluid the heavier impurities which sink and in the course of time accumulate in the settling chamber formed by the bottom of the casing 3.

The fluid, after reaching the bottom of the shield, then reverses its movement and follows an upward path, entering the open end of the shield, passing through the screen 53, into the screened space between the screen and the walls of the shield, and out through the discharge passages described, the screen serving to separate from the fluid the lighter, solid. foreignl particles incapable of passing through the screen and not previously separated by the action of centrifugal force and gravity. f

The cap piece is provided with a wall 61 interposed between the inlet and outlet passages, this wall being apertured and threaded to receive a screw 63. The aperture in the wall 61 is open to the top of the oil receiving space below the cap piece and is connected through ports65 and 67 with the inlet and outlet passages, the screw 63, however, normally closing the aperture to the oil receiving space and to the inlet and outlet passages. By loosening or removing the screw, any air trapped in the strainer when the filter is first, put into operation, or at any other time, may be released and the air lock which might otherwise exist may berelieved. After the trapped air has been released, the screw is again turned down to its seat and remains in that position during the normal operation of the filter.

It will be observed that the screen is positioned within the shield with its open end presented t'o the incoming fluid, the edges of the open end of the screen being Xedly secured to the edges 4of the shield and the opposite or apex end of the screen being xedly secured to the stem of the end closure. This provides a firm anchorage for the screen, resisting any tendency to collapse or deform under the force vof impact ofithei moving liquid. The screen is V further strengthened in this respect by its method of attachment at the apex through thepwedge block `55 by.

means of which the screen when fastened in any accumulation of foreign material. The

yoke clamp provides a simple, inexpensive connect-ion by which the chamber may be readilyv clamped to the cap-shield-strainer element without danger of breakage, while providing a fluid tight joint or seal.

While I have herein shown and described for the purposes of illustration one s ecific embodiment of the invention, it is'to e understood that extensive changes and devia tions jmay be made from the illustrated form 1 and relative arrangement of parts, all without departing from the spiritthereof. l

Claims:

l. A separator comprising an outer cylindrical casing having a closed bottom, a cap closin the top thereof, a cylindrical` cuplike s ield having an upper closed end se.- curedto the cap, extending with its open end d own intothe casing providing an annular circulating space between the shield and the casing, a generally conical screen having its edges secured to the cup, a wedge block for securing the apex of the screen to the closed end of the cap in fixed tensioned relation, inlet passages for imparting a swirling motion to the entering fluid in the circulating space, and outlet passages communicating with the screen space of the shield.

2. Aseparator comprising anv outer casing with a closed lower end and an open upper end, a cap for closing the upper end and providing inlet and outlet passages, a member projecting downwardly from said cap and having a passage therethrough connected' to the outlet passage of the cap, an inner casing located within said outer casing and providing an annular circulating space between the inner and outer casings, said space being connected tothe inlet passage of the cap, the inner casing having a lower end open to the circulating space and an upper end closed thereto, a connection for the upper closed end of the casing adapted to fasten `the same to the member projecting down-K wardly from said cap, there being provided .a passageA through said connection leading from the screened space within said inner casing to the outlet passage of the cap, a screen having its peripheral edges secured to the edges of the open end of the inner casing, and a rigid fastening for the central portion of said screen to the connection ofthe closed end of the casing.

3. A separator having an outer casing with a closed lower end and an open upper end, a cap for closing the upper end, providing inlet and outlet passages and having secured thereto an inner casing having an open lower end adapted to extend into-the outer casing but to `be spaced therefrom to provide a circulating space thereat, means for imparting to the entering fluid a swirling path downwardly through said circulating space, Screening means for screening fluid entering the open end of the casing comprising a conical wire screen having its peripheral edges secured to the lower open end of the inner casing, said screen entering within the inner casing and having a rigid central connection to the upper end or apex thereof and holding said screen in fixed tensioned relation and said inner casing being provided with passages leading from the screened space within said inner casin to the outlet passage ofthe cap, and means or clampin position over the open end o? the outer casing whereby when unclamped the cap, inner casing and screen may be removed as a single ieee.

P 4. A separator comprising an outer casing having a closed bottom, an inner casing having an open lower end and a closed upper end and providing a circulating space between the outer casing and the inner casing, means for imparting to the entering iiuid a swirling path downwardly through said circulating space, and a cone shaped wire screen havin its peripheral edges secured to the o en en of the inner casing and its apex rigidly secured to the upper end thereof in xed tensioned relation, said separator having outlet passa es communicating with the screened space etween the screen and the walls of the inner casing. i

5. A separator comprising an outer casin and an inner casing spaced therefrom an open at its lower end only to the space within the outer casing, a screen entering within the inner casing and having its peripheral edges secured to the lower edges of the inner casing and fastened centrally and rigidly to the upper closed end of the inner casing and held in fixed tensioned relation, and outlet and inlet passages to direct entering fluid in a swirling path downwardly about the inner casing, to the inner casing and through the screen.

6. A separator comprising an outer casing and an inner casing spaced therefrom and open at its lower end only to the space within the outer casing,`a generally conical screen the clap piece inl secured at its peripheral edges to the edges of the lower open end of the inner casing, a connection for the apex of the screen presented b the upper end of the inner casing, a wedge blbck for clamping the apex of the screen thereto in fixed tensioned relation, and inlet and outlet passages to direct the entering fluid in a swirling path downwardly about the outer casing, to the inner casing and through the screen.

In testimony whereof, I have signed my name to this specification.

- EZEKIEL F. WHITE.

los

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2605902 *Dec 26, 1946Aug 5, 1952Curtis Automotive Devices IncFilter
US2758719 *Jan 22, 1953Aug 14, 1956Ansul Chemical CoDehydrator
US3334754 *Nov 23, 1964Aug 8, 1967Marvel Engineering CompanyFilter head structure
US3379312 *Mar 16, 1965Apr 23, 1968North American RockwellFluid strainers
US3698555 *Nov 23, 1970Oct 17, 1972John R ConnerSelf-cleaning filter system
US4145928 *Feb 16, 1978Mar 27, 1979Ecological Analysts Inc.Automated entrainment abundance sampler
US4321139 *May 7, 1980Mar 23, 1982American Home Products CorporationFiltering unit for biological fluids
US4502954 *Jul 19, 1982Mar 5, 1985Druffel James BCombination fuel filter and water separator
US5897787 *Aug 21, 1997Apr 27, 1999Dresser Industries, Inc.Strainer and method for separating solid particles from a liquid
Classifications
U.S. Classification210/304, 210/497.1, 210/444
International ClassificationB01D35/00
Cooperative ClassificationB01D35/005
European ClassificationB01D35/00B