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Publication numberUS1781623 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 11, 1930
Filing dateAug 11, 1928
Priority dateAug 11, 1928
Publication numberUS 1781623 A, US 1781623A, US-A-1781623, US1781623 A, US1781623A
InventorsJohn S Zink
Original AssigneeJohn S Zink
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gas burner
US 1781623 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. S. ZINK GAS BURNER Nov. 11, 1930.

2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Aug. 11, 1928 gnmmtoc John. 6'. Z

dttomwg Patented Nov. 11, 1930 UNITED "STATES JOHN S. ZINK, OF TULSA, OKLAHOMA GAS BURNER,

Application filed August 11, 1928. Serial No. 299,046.

This invention relates to improvements in gas burners, and more especially to a gas burner particularly adapted for use in locomotive type boilers of the kind employed for drilling purposes.

One of the objects of the invention is to provide a burner structure designed to rest on the mud rim of the boiler, and occupy a portion of the space formerly taken up by the grate, the remaining grate opening, not occupied by the burner, being covered with sheet iron, which in turn is protected from the heat by a thin layer of soil or the like.

A further object of the invention is to pro- 1 vide a pressure gas burner including a plu rality of units, each unit including hollow radial arms provided with diverging sets of apertures, whereby when the gaseousmixture is forced through the arms under pressure,

fine streams or jets of said mixture will im-v pinge above the burner and induce a flow of air through a passageway in'which the arms are located; the construction being such that complete combustion takes place above the burner, and whereby a colorless or transparent flame is produced.

A further object is to furnish a burner, including a plurality of vertically disposed collars forming passageways in which the star 39 shaped burner elements are located; a supporting bar being provided for said elements,

, and a connection between the elements and bar, permitting vertical adjustment of the elements to obtain the results desired.

Another object is to provide a plural burner structure including a frame having passageways for the burner elements, and a supporting bar to hold the burner elements in proper position, said supporting bar being se- 49 cured to the frame by a single bolt or the like, in order that the structure may be readily assembled or dismantled.

Another object is to furnish a burner element supporting bar designed to be wedged in position so as to remain in position after it is once secured in place by a bolt or the like.

A still further object is to provide a burner of simple and inexpensive construction, and one designed to furnish maximum heat, due to the fact that complete combustion takes place, and the burner operates to colorless transparent flame.

With the foregoing objects outlined and with other objects in view which will appear as the description proceeds, the invention consists in the novel features hereinafter described in detail, illustrated in the accompanying drawings, and' more particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

Referring to the drawings,

Fig. 1 is a top plan View of the burner showing the same arranged on the mud rim of a locomotive type boiler, and occupying a part of the place normally taken up by the grate.

Fig. 2 is a vertical sectional view on line 2-2 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is an enlarged view of the burner, partly in elevation, and partly in vertical section, the section being taken on line 3-3 of Fig. 4.

Fig. 4 is an enlarged top plan view of the burner.

Fig. 5 is a transverse vertical sectional view of a detail, taken on line 5-5 of Fig. 3. r

Fig. 6 is a horizontal sectional view of a detail, taken on line 6-6 of Fig. 3.

Fig. 7 is a vertical sectional view of one of the burner arms taken on line 77 of Fig. 4.

Fig. 8 is a perspective view of one of theburner collars which forms an air passageway in which one of the star shaped burner elements is located.

In the drawings, 1 represents the mud rim of a locomotive type boiler, on which the grate usually rests. As my invention is designed to permit gas to be burned in the fire box of the boiler in place of coal or the like, I remove the grate and place on the mud rim, my improved burner 2, which includes a frame 3 designed to rest at its ends on the mud rim.- It may be seen from Fig. 1, that the burner occupies only a portion of the space usually occupied by the grate, and in order that the only air admitted to the fire box will pass through the burner, I arrange on the mud rim, at opposite sides of the burner, metal plates 4, (Fig. 2), and on these plates, arrange a layer of soil 5, about three inches deep. This elfectively blocks 01f the air from below the mud rim and causes produce a all air to travel through the air passageways 6 of the burner.

As best shown in Fig. 3, the frame of the burner is made of a metal casting, including a plate 7, having a depending marginal flange 8, and a pair of downwardly extending collars or skirts 9 the latter forming the boundaries of the air passageways 6. Each collar has oppositely curved end walls 10, and plain parallel side walls 11, and each of the side walls is notched, as shown at 12 and 13, at its lower edge, to receive a wedge shaped supporting bar 14. This bar is also preferably cast, and is provided intermediate its ends with an aperture 15 that merges into a cavity 16 on the under side of the bar. When the bar is occupying the notches, it, and the parts which it supports. are held in position by some suitable fastening means, such as a bolt 17, which passes through an aperture in the plate 7 downwardly between the collars 9, and then through the aperture 15 of the supporting bar. A nut 18 is threaded on the lower end of the bolt.

From Figs. 3 and 6, it may be seenthat the bar is not alone wedge shaped in cross section, but its ends converge upwardly, as shown at 19, and when the nut 18 is tightened, theseinclined or converging ends wedge themselves against the outer walls 11 of the collars 9, and due to this and the wedged shape of the bar and notches 12 and 13, the

'bar is jammed into position, and will occupy such position indefinitely.

Sleeves 20 form part of the bar, and are arranged between the aperture 15 and the ends of the bar, and a short two inch pipe 21 occupies each of these sleeves and is secured in position by a screw 22 or the like. When lid the screw is loosened, the two inch pipe may be readily slid through its associated sleeve.

A spreader or burner element is arranged in each of the air passageways 6, and is mounted on the pipe 21, and this burner element forms an important feature of the pres ent' invention. It preferably consists of a hollow casting, including a relatively large central chamber 23. which receives the proper mixture of air and gas from the pipe 21 and feeds this mixture into the hollow radiating arms24.

From Fig. 7, it maybe seen that each of these arms has a relatively large passageway 25 therein, and the side walls of each arm.

converge upwardly, as shown at 26, toward the top 27 of the arm. These converging surfaces are, of course, arranged at angles to the top 27, and they are provided with a multiplicity of relatively large apertures 28, the axes of which are arranged substantially perpendicularly to the outer surfaces of the inclined portions 26 of the side walls, whereby when the burner is in operation, jets of the gaseous mixture will exit through the walls 28 under pressure, and will impinge against one another above the burner element, and at the lines of impingement, will be mixed with secondary air admitted through the passageways 6.

Each burner element has a depending centrally disposed threaded socket 29 that is screwed on to the upper ends of one of the pipes 21.

Atmospheric mixers 30 are screwed on to the lower ends of the pipes 21, and each of these mixers includes a gas nozzle 31, having its axis coincident with the axis of the pipe 21, so that the gas issuing from the nozzle 31, under pressure, will flow through the pipe 21 with great velocity, and induce a current of primary air through the annular passageway 32 which surrounds the nozzle 31, and has its lower end open.

Each atmospheric mixer has a laterally extending threaded socket 33 connected by short pipes 34, to a T 35 that is connected to the as main 36.

P ugs 37, preferably close the lower ends of the nozzles 31, in order that all of the as entering the nozzles under pressure, will fi ow upwardly into the pipes 21.

From the foregoing description, it is believed that the operation of the burner will be apparent, but it may be statedbriefly that the gas, such as natural gas, is forced into-the T 35 under pressure, and in travelling from the nozzles 31 into the pipes 21, induces and is mixed with primary air admitted through the passageways 32. This mixture, upon striking the plates 38 at the central portion of the spreaders or burner elements, is spread out and then rushes into the relatively large chambers 25 of the hollow arms 24, from which it issues in a multiplicity of relatively large jets which impinge above the burner elements and induce the flow of secondary air through the passageway 6. When the mixture is ignited, the resulting combustion produces intense heat and a colorless transparent flame. I

Vith this arrangement and with gas pressures above three lbs. per square inch, I have obtained very rapid combustion of large quantities of gas with little or no draft from the smokestack, and this is an advantage in connection with drilling boilers. for in such cases, it is very essential to use the gas under pressure to induce the air flow for combustion, and at the same time, to burn relatively large amounts of gas in very limited fire boxes.

In actual practice, one of these burners has been set up out doors, and it was found that while the heat produced was very intense, there was absolutely no color to the flame; the latter evidencing complete combustion of the large quantities of gas forced through the apparatus. At the time of this observation, the burner was operating at the rate of 8000 cubic feet per hour, and the demonstration showed how thoroughly and how quickly this burner mixes the air and gas.

It might be observed in closing this specification, that the construction is such that the elements may be rapidly assembled or dismantled, and that the single bolt 17 permits instantaneous detachment of the burner elements from the frame 3.

In the drawings, each of the spreaders is shown with six radiating arms, but in actual practice, I prefer to use eight arms on each spreader, as I find that such a structure operates With maximum efficiency. While -the burner will work with six arms, I have found that it is best to keep the space between the extremities of the arms less than six inches. In the eight arm burner, the distance between the extremities of each pair of arms is approximately four and one half inches.

--Ihave also found in practice that the angles of the jets with the face of the spreader, should be sixty degrees or more.

While I have shown and described a twot'nit burner, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that one or more units might be used, depending on the heat required of the burner.

I am aware that various changes may be made in the details disclosed, without departing from the spirit of the invention, as expressed in the claims.

What I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A burner, including an air pasageway, a spreader located in the passageway and provided with a' number of spaced radial arms, each having sets of diverging apertures arranged to cause jets of gaseous fluid from the apertures of the arms to impinge above the arms, and means for feeding a mixture of air and gas under pressure to the spreader, the spaces between the arms being unobstructed to allow secondary air to mix with the impinging jets above the spreader.

2. In a pressure gas burner, an air passageway, a pipe in the passageway, an atmospheric mixer connected to the pipe, means for feeding gas under pressure into the mixer, means forming part of the mixer to permit the gas under pressure to induce the flow of air through the mixer, and a spreader receiving the mixture of gas and air from said pipe, said spreader including a central casing and a plurality of hollow radiating arms, the central casing enclosing a relatively large chamber, and each arm having a relatively large passageway communicating with said chamber, each arm having a plurality of diverging sets of apertures arranged to direct jets of the gaseous mixture into impinging relationship above the spreader.

3. In a pressure gas burner, an air passageway, a spreader arranged in the passageway and including a central casing and aplurality of spaced radiating arms, the casing and arms being hollow, and each arm having diverging sets of relatively large apertures to direct 'ets of a gaseous fluld into impinging relations ip above the spreader, the spaces between the arms being unobstructed to allow secondary air to mix with the impinging jets above the spreader, a pipe forfeeding a mixture of air and as to the central chamber of the sprea er, an atmospheric mixer connected to the pipe and including a central gas nozzle and an annular air passagewa surrounding the same, and means for feeding gas under pressure to said nozzle.

4. In a pressure gas burner, a frame having a collar forming a secondary air passageway, a gaseous mixture spreader in said passageway, a bar detachably connected to said collar, a pipe extending through and carried by the bar and supporting said spreader, an atmospheric mixer connected to the pipe below said bar, and means for feeding gas under pressure into said atmospheric mixer.

5. A pressure gas burner, including a frame provided with a collar forming a secondary air passageway, a gaseous mixture spreader arranged in the passageway, said collar being provided with wedge shaped notches, a wedge shaped bar engaging the notches, means for detachably holding the bar in position, a pipe passing through the bar and supporting the spreader, means for supporting the pipe from the bar, an atmospheric mixer connected to the pipe below said bar, and means for feeding gas into said mixer.

6. In a pressure gas burner, a frame provided with a collar forming a secondary air passageway, a gaseous mixture spreader arranged in said passageway, a bar crossing the collar and detachably connected to the frame, a sleeve forming part of the bar, a pipe passing through the sleeve and supporting said spreader, means for detachably securing the pipe to the sleeve, an atmospheric mixer connected to the pipe, and means for feeding gas to the-atmospheric mixer.

7. A gas burner including a frame having depending collars forming secondary air passageways, a bar extending across said collars, means for detachablyconnecting the bar to the frame, gaseous mixture spreaders arranged in .said passageways, pipe supporting the spreaders, means for detachably connecting the pipes to the bar, atmospheric mixers connected to said pipes, and means for feed ing gas under pressure to said mixers.

8; A pressure gas burner including a frame provided with collars forming secondary air passageways, a bar extending across said collars and detachably connected to the frame, pipes carried by the bar, atmospheric mixers connected to the pipes, and each including a gas nozzle for directing gas into the pipe,

means for admitting air to each of said mixers, means for introducing gas under pressure into said nozzles, and spreaders arranged in the secondary air passageways and mounted on said pipes, each spreader having hollow radial arms provided with diverging sets of apertures arranged to direct jets of gaseous fluid into impinging relationship at one side of the spreader.

9. In a. gas burner, a frame provided with collars forming secondary air passageways, each of said collars being notched, a bar wedged into the notches, means for detachably holding the bar in position, pipes supported by the bar, spreaders mounted on t pipes and each having hollow radiating arms provided with diverging sets of apertures arranged to cause jets of gaseous fluid issuing through the apertures to impinge at one side of the spreader, an atmospheric mixer connected to each pipe, and means for feeding gas under pressure to each of said mixers.

In testimony whereof I afiix my signature.

JOHN S. ZINK.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6851420Sep 27, 2002Feb 8, 2005Bsh Home Appliances CorporationBurner with piloting ports
US7628609Jun 26, 2007Dec 8, 2009Electrolux Home Products, Inc.Hub and spoke burner with flame stability
US7871264Jun 26, 2007Jan 18, 2011Electrolux Home Products, Inc.Hub and spoke burner port configuration
US8057223Nov 9, 2009Nov 15, 2011Electrolux Home ProduceHub and spoke burner with flame stability
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/419.5, 239/543, 126/39.00K
International ClassificationF23D14/04
Cooperative ClassificationF23D14/04
European ClassificationF23D14/04