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Publication numberUS1781715 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 18, 1930
Filing dateFeb 14, 1929
Priority dateFeb 14, 1929
Publication numberUS 1781715 A, US 1781715A, US-A-1781715, US1781715 A, US1781715A
InventorsBlakely Sidney R
Original AssigneeBlakely Sidney R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Insole and method of making same
US 1781715 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 18, 1930. s. R. BLAKELY INSOLiE AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME Filed Feb. 14. 1929 3 ffm www Patented Nov. 18, 1930` UNITED STATES vParri-:NT OFFICE SIDNEY n. BLAKELY, or JAMAICA PLAIN, MAssAcnusnr'rs INSOLE AND' METHOD OF MAKING Application mea February 14,v 1929. serial No. 339,811.v

plication Ser. No. 339,812, filed Feb. 14, 1929.

Insoles embodying my present invention are equally applicable for use in turn, welt, McKay, or cemented shoes, the drawing of the present application illustrating an insole loprimarily adapted for use in McKay shoes,

but it will be understood that this is for illustrative purposes only and that I am not limited thereto. i

An important object-of the presentinven-` tion is the provision lof an insole which will have an abrupt break therein at the rear of the shank portion thereof, this break being defined yby a substantially vertical wall against which the foot of the wearer will bear.

Another object of the present invention resides in providing, in sald insole, and before assembly in a shoe, a rounded heel seat which, combined with the aforesaid substantially vertical wall, will form a deep pocket in which, in the completed shoe, is adapted to be iitted a heel pad of considerable depth and of suiicient cushioning capacity so that the heel of the wearerwill compress said pad to a suiicient extent to allow the forward part of the heel of the wearer to bear against the edge of said wall.

Another object of the invention resides in aiiixing, to the heel portion of said insole, and before the molding operation to round the same, a reinforcing layer or plate, preferably of non-metallic material, o suflicientbody and stiffness to retain the rounded contour once the same has been molded in said heel portion.

40. Another object of the invention resldes 1n the fact that I utilize a blank of greater length thany the length of the completed 1nsole.

A still further object of the invention re- 145 sides in applying, to the shank portion of said insole, and spaced from said reinforcing layer on the heel portion, a second stitemng Ymember, adapte for a shank stlflemng element. Another feature of the invention resides in positioning, in the space between said two relnforclng layers, a strip of material, such as leather, extending transversely of the insole,

vof sufficient flexibility to permit the bending thereof with the insole to form the vertical wall above mentioned, and of sufficient stiffness to retain said wall.

I believe that an insole manufactured as above, is novel, and I have therefore claimed the same broadly in the present application.

I also believe that the method of` manufacturing-said insole, above briefly described, is novel, and said process is therefore also claimed in the present application. y

The above and other objects of the invention, features, details and advantages, will be hereinafter more fully pointed out, described and claimed.

Referring to the drawings, illustrating a preferred embodiment of the present inven- 1on, Y

Fig. l is a bottom plan view of an insole blank;

Fig. 2 is a side elevation of said blank after application ofthe reinforcing heel layer and rounding thereof;

Fig. 3 is a bottom lan view after application of the shank sti ening element;

Fig. 4 is a bottom plan view after application of the strip between said shank stiffening elementl and said heel layer; y

Fig. 5 is alongitudinal sectional view of the insole as illustrated in Fig. 4;

Fig. 6 is alongitudinal sectional view after breaking of the insole to form the vertical wall and pocket therein;

Fig. 7 is a topplan view of the heel portion of the insole as illustrated in Fig. 6;

Fig. 8 is a perspective view of the heel port-ion of the insole as illustrated in Figs. 6 and 7 and Fig. 9 is a fragmentary longitudinal sectional view of the heel portion of said'insole illustrating thelpositioning therein of a to the shape of an insole, but of slightly* fibrous material, such as fibreboard or leatheradhesive, or by board, of greater stiffness and body than the material of the blank 1. This layer 3 may be secured to the heel portion of the blank by staples 4, or both, and this heel portion, including the layer 3, is then subjected to a molding operation which will give a rounded inner cup, as illustrated at 5, this cu or concavity being rounded to predetermined contour.

I then apply, over the shank portion of the blank 1, a strip or' layer 6, preferably of the same material as the layer 3, this strip being secured to the said blank by any suitable adhesive. The strip 6 and layer 3 are separated, as clearl illustrated in Fig. 3, leaving a space 7 there etween. The insole, thus far` assembled, is subjected to a molding operation at the shank portion to produce the arched effect illustrated in Figs. 5 and 6. If desired, the molding operations above described may be performed simultaneously, or separately.

I then apply, to that portion of the insole between the strip 6 and layer 3, in the space designated as 7, a transverse strip 8, preferably of a material less rigid or stiff than either the strip 6 or layer 3.- This strip 8 is also secured to the blank by means of any suitable cement or adhesive. I then subject the insole, as thus far prepared, to a breaking operation, in a suitable machine or device, as a result of which the heel portion is lowered from the remainder of the insole, by an abrupt break, defined by the substantially vertical wall 9, said Wall preferably extending squarely across the forward portion of the heel, as illustrated in Fig. 7.

The nature of the material of the strip 8 is such that it will bend to the shape illustrated in Figs. 6 and 8, but is of sufficient stiffness or rigidity, combined with the blank 1, to retain itself in the shape to which it is molded or broken.

When formed. as illustrated in Fig. 6, the insole is ready for application to the last of my said copending application, although it will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the shaping of the insole with the vertical wall 9 may be performed after being applied to the last, by beating or pressing, but I preferably perforin this step before application to the last, to avoid any injury to the insole through hammering or beating.

. The edges of the heel layer 3 are preferably skived or beveled, as are also the front and rear edges of the stri 6, and the edges of the strip 8 adJacent to t e side of the shank, to

my novel insole will wearer thereof, eliminating man effect a better fitting of the insole within the completed shoe.

The pocketthus formed in the insole .is then capable of receiving a relatively deep heel pad or cushion 10, having a straight front wall 11 adapted to abut against the vertical wall 9. Thus, in the completed shoe, when the Weight of the wearer is put in the shoe, the heel ad 10 will compress sufficiently to allow the orward part of the heel of the wearer to bear or abut against the wall 9, thus affording a firm grip for the heel of the wearer in the heel part of the shoe, and

preventing the throwing of the weight of the wearer entirely on the ball and toes of the foot, as is done in existing types of high heel shoes.

In my copending application Ser. No., 343,405, filed Feb. 28, 1929, I have illustrated an optional method of forming the break in the insole, together with another type of shank piece, and a modified form of heel iece.

The utility, eiiicienc and advantages of e apparent to those skilled in the art, and when incorporated in the shoe of my said copending application, will result in great comfort and ease to the foot and orthopedic troubles occasioned y present shoes of the high heel type.

While I have necessarily described my.

present invention somewhat in detail, it will be appreciated that I may vary the size, shape and arrangement of parts within reasonably wide limits without departing from the spirit of the invention.

The invention is further described and defined in the form of claims as follows:

1. In an insole for use in the manufacture of boots and shoes, a layer of reinforcin material fixed on the heel portion thereo said heelportion and said reinforcing layer having a cup formed therein before appli` cation to a last, and a separate layer of reinforcing material fixed thereto along the shank portion thereof, said shank portion and said reinforcing layer having an arch forme-d therein before application to a last.

thereof, said break being defined by a substanti'ally vertical wall, a la er of reinforcing material on the heel ortlon thereof, said heel portion and said reinforcing layer having a cup formed therein, a layer of reinforcing material along the shank portion thereof,

' sa1d shank portion and said reinforcing layer having an arch formed therein.

4. In an insole for use in the manufacture of boots and shoes, a layer of reinforcing material on the heel portion thereof, a layer of reinforcing material on the shank portion thereof7 said layers being separated one from the other, and a layer ofreinforcing material extending transversely of the shank at the rear thereof between said irst two layers, said insole having an abrupt break therein reinforced by said last mentioned layer at the rear of said shank` portion, said break being defined by a substantially vertical wall.

5. That improvement in the art of manufacturing insoles, which comprises applying a layer of reinforcing material to the heel portion of a blank of greater length than the completed insole, concaving said heel portion and said reinforcing layer, applying a layer of reinforcin material to the shank portion of said blan and then arching said shank portion and said reinforcing layer.

- 6. That improvement in the art of manu'- facturing insoles, which comprises applying a layer of reinforcing material to the heel portion of a blank of greater length than the completed insole, concaving said heel portion l and said reinforcing layer, applying a layer of reinforcing material to the shank portion of said blank, arching said shank portion and said reinforcing layer, and then subjecting said blank to a breaking operation, whereby a substantiall vertical wall will be produced at therear o the shank portion of suicient height to reduce said insole to desired length.

7. That improvement in the art of manufacturing insoles, which comprises a plying a layer of reinforcing material to he heel portion of a blank of greater length than the completed insole, concaving said heel portion and said reinforcing layer, applying a layer of reinforcing material tothe shank portion of said blank, arching said shank portion and said-reinforcing layer, said layers being separated one from the other, apply.

ing a strip of material to the blank to the space etween said layers, andthen subjectin said blank to a breaking operation, where y a substantially vertical wall will be produced at the rear of the shank portion of sufficient height to reduce said insole to desired length. Y

In testimony whereof,I'have signed my name to this specification.

SIDNEY R. BLAKELY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2529818 *Dec 24, 1948Nov 14, 1950United Shoe Machinery CorpLeather shoe part blank and method of making
US2767490 *Apr 16, 1953Oct 23, 1956Marbill CompanySlip soles for converting over-the-shoe boots to over-the-foot boots
US3134381 *Aug 15, 1960May 26, 1964William M SchollShank and heel assembly
US3161970 *Jul 17, 1961Dec 22, 1964Raymond F PurtellShoe insoles
US5878510 *Jul 19, 1996Mar 9, 1999Schoesler; Henning R.Fluid filled insole
US5983529 *Jul 31, 1997Nov 16, 1999Vans, Inc.Footwear shock absorbing system
US6092310 *Mar 8, 1999Jul 25, 2000Schoesler; Henning R.Fluid filled insole
US6138382 *Mar 8, 1999Oct 31, 2000Schoesler; Henning R.Fluid filled insole
US6145220 *Nov 22, 1995Nov 14, 2000Georgia Boot, Inc.Cushioned footwear and apparatus for making the same
US6178663Mar 8, 1999Jan 30, 2001Henning R. SchoeslerFluid filled insole with metatarsal pad
US6408544Jul 2, 1999Jun 25, 2002Bbc International Ltd.Flex sole
US6564476Feb 2, 2000May 20, 2003Bbc International, Ltd.Flex sole
US6802138Feb 8, 2002Oct 12, 2004Wolverine World Wide, Inc.Cushioning system for footwear and related method of manufacture
WO1999005928A1 *May 29, 1998Feb 11, 1999Vans IncFootwear shock absorbing system
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/173, 12/146.00S, 36/76.00R, 36/37, 36/44, 36/27, 36/43, 12/146.00M
International ClassificationA43B21/32, A43B21/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43B21/32
European ClassificationA43B21/32