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Publication numberUS1783276 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 2, 1930
Filing dateFeb 21, 1929
Priority dateFeb 21, 1929
Publication numberUS 1783276 A, US 1783276A, US-A-1783276, US1783276 A, US1783276A
InventorsHoward R Bliss
Original AssigneeHoward R Bliss
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sound-controlling ventilating device
US 1783276 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

' 'I 33cc, 1., 19 H. R. BLISS SGUND CONTROLLING VENTILATING DEVICE Filed Feb. 21, 1929 2 SheetsSheet l I VENTOR fi. 6AM

Dec. 2, 1930. uss 1,783,276

i SOUND CONTROLLING VENTILATING DEVICE Filed Feb. 21, i929 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 'ATTORN EY6 Patented Dec. 2, 1930 HOWARD B.- "IBLISS, F FLUSHIN G, NEW YORK SOUND-CONTROLLING VENTILATING DEVICE Application filed February 21, 1929. Serial No. 341,702.

My invention relates particularly to a. device for eliminating or reducing the transmission of sound while at the same time providing adequate ventilation, the same being '5 adapted for use in connection with structures of any desired-character wherever ventilation is desired without at the same time admitting undesirable sounds.

The object of my invention is to provide a 1 device of the above character whereby adequate ventilation may be obtained while at the same time preventing disturbances due to undesired sounds. More particularly the object is to provide an apparatus of this kind which may be introduced into window or door frames or other openings provided for ven tilation purposes. Again, another object is to so break up any sound waves which are carried by air currents in such a manner as to 29 practically completely eliminate the same, at

least to such an extent as to render them substantially inaudible to those protected by the apparatus. A further object is to enable a device of this kind to be arranged so as to fit within different widths of openings to be ventilated. A .iurther object is to prevent the entry of dust and cinders with the ventilating air currents. Again, another object is to provide means for accomplishing the above purposes while at the same time even producing an increased or forced current of air through the ventilation opening.

While my invention is capable of embodiment in many diiierent forms, for the purpose of illustration I have shown only certain forms of the same in the accompanying drawings, in which Fig. 1 is a horizontal section or an apparatus madein accordance with my invention; Fig. 2 is an outside elevation of the same;

Fig. 3 is an outside elevation of a modified form of my,invention in which a plurality of tiers of ventilating openings are provided;

Fig. 4 is an outside elevation of a window shown equipped with my invention;

' Fig. 5 is a horizontal section of the apparatus as shown in Fig. 4; and taken on line 5-5 thereof;

Fig. 6 is a vertical section of another modi- 5O fied form of my apparatus;

gig. 7 is an outside elevation of the same; an

Fig. 8 is a horizontal section of still another modified form of my invention, in whloh the apparatus is so constructed as to elimlnate even the smallest audible sounds or to provide for the elimination of sounds of unusual magnitude.

In the drawings, I have shown soundeliminating ventilators comprising structures which may be made of any desired materials, but which are preferably constructed from materials having low sound conductivity, as, for instance, fibre board etc.

In Fig. 1, I have shown an apparatus comprising an outer plate 1, having a plurality of circular holes 2 therein located side by side, from which holes 2 there project inwardly a plurality of converging cone-shaped passageways 3, having diminutive outlets 4 near the apex thereof. Just beyond the apexes there is provided an innerplate 5 containing a series of small openings 6, to which there are secured a series of outwardly directed convergmg cone shaped passageways 7, the wider ends of which are open and occupy spaces between the adjacent inwardly directed coneshaped passageways 3.

The outwardly directed passageways 7 are axially displaced away from the axes of the inwardly directed passageway 3, in order to cause the sound waves to be broken up and distorted, as hereinafter described. It will be understood, of course, that these converging passageways 3 and 7, which are shown in conical form in the drawings, may have any other similar construction, such as pyramidal, although I prefer the conical shape as producmg the most effective elimination of sound, as Wlll be apparent from the description of the operation hereinafter.

The apparatus is closed at the two sides by means of end pieces 8 and 9 secured thereto and at the top and bottom by closures 10 and 11 which are also secured thereto.

If desired, as shown in Fig. 3, there may be provided a plurality of tiers 12, 13, and 14 of the inwardly directed and outwardly directed cones.

Again, as indicated in Figs. 4 and 5, the apvided at each side thereof with a laterally ex-- paratus may be so constructed as to enable it to fit any desired width of window frame. For this purpose the apparatus may be protachment to. the si e of one of the end closures 8 or 9. i

As shown in Fig. 6, in order to secure any desired amount of ventilation in the soundeliminatin device, I may provide such a sound-eliminating device 21, the outside of which is enclosed by a rectangular tapered en- 4 closure 22, having at the small outer end of the 9 ing air, and in such amanner as to further in-' same an electric fan 23 for forcing the air in wardly, located in a circular opening 24 provided in a plate 25, which extends across the outside smaller end of the tapered enclosure 22. A similar device is preferably used at the top of the window, although there may be provided another sound-eliminating device 26, constructed the same, except that in this instance the cone-shaped passageways extend in the reverse direction to those shown in the device 21 at the bottom of thewindow. Furthermore, in this instance, the sound-eliminating device 26 has on the outside thereof, but which in this instance is the side containing the small ventilating openings, a rectangular tapered enclosure 27, in which there is located an electrically-driven fan 28 for forcing the air outwardly. The said fan 28 is located in a circular openin '29 provided in an outer enclosure 30 exten ing across the smaller end of the tapered enclosure 27.

In the form of my invention as shown in Fig. 8, the construction is the same as that shown in Fig. 1, except that in this instance two such devices 31 and'32 are provided,- located one in front of the other, but in such a manner as to leave a transverse passageway 33 across the same for the passage of ventilatterrupt the transmission of sounds, due to the fact that the small openings 34 on the inside of the unit 31 overlie transversely directed surfaces 35 on the inner sound-eliminating unit. In this instance, furthermore, endwalls 36 and 37 are provided extending completely across the ends of the composite sound-eliminating device, so as to completely close the ends thereof.

It will be understood, of course, that such a composite unit may be used with the other features shown in the other figures of the drawings made in accordance with my invention or used in any of the ways as set forth therein. y

In the operation of my invention, referring first to the form shown inFigs. 1 and 2, it will temporarily, said device being positioned in such a way, however, that the outwardly flaring openings of the cone-shaped passageways 3 are directed outwardly from the space or room to be ventilated and protected from the access of sound. Any sound waves which may enter the apparatus with the ventilating air are thus caused to be distorted in the first instance by passing into the converging coneshaped inwardly directed passages 3. It will be noted particularly in this connection, fur-' thermore, that the reflection of such sounds causes them to be ultimately directed backwardly and outwardly in a direction opposite to the current of air and also opposite to the incoming sound waves, thus creating interfer-' ence between the sound waves, resulting in their destruction and elimination. The cireularly-shaped walls of these cone-shaped passageways 3 provide the utmost distortion of the sound waves by reflection etc. in all directions.

Thereafter the currents of air, with thesound waves already greatly distorted, pass through the constricted openings 4 and are dispersed in all directions, but oppositely to the converging directions of the cone-shaped passageways 3, and the sound waves are again dispersed and reflected in all directions by the outside of the outwardly directed cone-shaped passageways 7 and thence again against the outside of the inwardly directed cone-shaped passageways 3 until the currents of air finally enter the large ends of the outwardly directed cone-shaped passageways 7.

Here, again, the sound waves are deflected by reflection in an outward direction from all sides of said passageways 7 until ultimately the currents of air pass through the small openings 6 at the apexes of the passageways 7 into the room or space to be ventilated andwith the sound waves substantially entirely eliminated. So great is this elimination of sound that, by the use of applicants apparatus, it has been demonstrated that the ticking In the form of my invention shown in Figs. 6 and 7, increased ventilation may be attained due to the presence of the electric fans 23 and 29, which cause an incoming current of air at the bottom of the room or space to be ventilated and an outgoing current of air through the top thereof.

These sound-eliminating devices as shown in Figs. 6 and 7 will, furthermore, secure the desired accentuated ventilation without the annoyance due to sounds which are ordinarily transmitted by ventilating fans, inasmuch as such sounds will be eliminated by means of the sound-eliminating devices used therewith.

In the form of my invention as shown in Fig. 8, this action of sound-elimination is still further accentuated by providing a composite unit containing one or more layers of the sound-eliminating devices, provision being made for permitting the adequate passage of the air between the same by a transverse passageway 33 leading between the layers thereof. This arrangement can, of course, be multiplied indefinitely in any particular situation. I

While I have described my invention above in detail, I wish it to be understood that many changes may be made therein without departing from the spirit of the same.

I claim:

1. A sound-reducing and ventilating device comprising an outer inwardly converging cone-shaped passageway, the larger end of which is adapted to act as an air inlet, and an inner inwardly converging cone-shaped passageway communicating with and located to one side of said outer passageway.

2. A sound-reducing and ventilating device comprisin an outer inwardly converging cone-shape passageway, the larger end of which is adapted to act as an air inlet, an inner inwardly converging cone-shaped passageway communicating with and located to one side of said outer passageway, an outer plate in which said outer passageway is supported, and an inner plate in which said inner passageway is supported.

3. A sound-reducin and ventilating device comprising a" pl urality of layers of sound-eliminating units located one in front of another each containing an outer inwardly converging passageway, the larger end of which is adapted to act as an air inlet, an inner inwardly converging passageway communicating with and located to one side of said outer passageway, an outer plate in which said outer passageway is supported, and an inner plate in which said inner passageway is supported, said plates being provided with a plurality of such adjacent outer and inner passageways, and the said layers being spaced apart for inter-communication between the same.

adapted to act as an air inlet, an inner in-' wardly converging passageway communicating with and located to one side of said outer passageway, an air forcing fan adapted to increase the ventilation located outside of said passageways, and an enclosure leading from said fan to the same.

' 5. A sound-reducing and ventilating device comprising an outer inwardly converging passageway, the larger end of which is adapted to act as an air inlet, an inner inwardly converging passageway communicating with and located to one side of said outer passageway, an outer plate in which said outer passageway is supported, an inner plate in.

6. A sound-reducing and ventilating device comprising a window, a ventilating unit for incoming air currents located at the bottom thereof, containing an outer inwardly converging passageway, the larger end of which is adapted to act asan air inlet, an inner inwardly converging passageway communicating with and located to one side of said outer passagewa an air forcing fan adapted to increase t e ventilation located outside of said passageways, and a similar unit for outgoing air currents located at the top of the window and having the passageways located in the same direction as those which are in the unit in the bottom of the window.

7. A sound-reducing and ventilating device comprising a window, a ventilating unit for incoming air currents located at the bottomthereof, containing an outer inwardly converging passageway, the larger end of which is adapted to act as, an air inlet, an inner inwardly converging passageway communicating with and located to one side of said outer passageway, an outer plate in which said outer passageway is supported, an inner plate in which said inner passageway is supported, an air forcing fan adapted to increase the ventilation located outside of said passageways and a similar unit for outgoing air currents located at the top of the window and having the passageways located in the same direction as those which" are in the unit in the bottom of the window.

8. A sound-reducing and ventilating device comprising a window, a ventilating-unit I for incoming air currents located at the bottom thereof, containing an outer inwardly converging passageway, the larger end of which Is adapted to act as an air inlet, an inner inwardlyconverging passageway communicating with and located to one side of said outer passageway, an air forcing fan adapted to increase the'ventilation located outside of said passageways, an enclosure leading from said fan to the same, and a similar unit for outgoing air currents located at the top of the win ow and having the' passageways located in the same direction as those which are in the unit in the bottom of the window.

9. A sound-reducing and ventilating device comprising a window, a ventilating unit for incoming air currents located at the bottom thereof, containing an outer inwardly -converging passageway, the larger end of which is adapted to act as an air inlet, an inner inwardly converging passageway communicating with and located to one side of said outer passageway, an outer plate in which said outer passageway is supported, an inner plate in which said inner passageway is supported, an air forcing fan adapted to increase the ventilation located outside of said passageways, an enclosure leading from said fan to the same, and a similar unit for outgoing air currents located at the top of the window and having the passageways located in the same direction as those which are in the unit in the bottom of the window.

10. A sound reducing and ventilating device including two spaced panels, and two communicating converging passageways, one located to the side of the other, one of the passageways being supported by each panel and both passageways pointing in the same direction.

11. A sound reducing and ventilating device including two spaced panels, two communicating converging passageways, one located to the side of the other, and one of the passageways being supported by each panel with both passageways pointing in the same direction, and plates for enclosing the space at the periphery of the panels to prevent sound from entering the device except through the passageways.

12. A sound reducing and ventilating device includingtwo spaced panels, two com municating converging passageways, one

located to the side of the other, one of the passageways being supported by each panel and both passageways pointing in the same sound from entering the device except,

direction, and an air forcing fan adapted to increase the ventilation and located at the large end of the passageways.

13. A sound reducing and ventilating device including two spaced panels, two communicating converging passageways, one located to the side of the other, vand one of the passageways being supported by eachpanel with both passageways pointingin the same direction, plates for enclosing the space at the periphery of the panels to prevent through the passageways, and an air forcing fan adapted to increase the ventilation and located at the large end of the passageways.

In testimony that I claim the foregoing,

I I have hereunto set-anyhaiad this 11th day of February, 1929.

p i i HOWARD R, BLISS.v

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4078477 *Aug 23, 1976Mar 14, 1978Bbc Brown Boveri & Comapny LimitedProtective screen, especially a protective screen for drift sand, for an electrical air-cooled machine
US4681608 *Apr 7, 1986Jul 21, 1987Kioritz CorporationSilencing filter
US5198626 *Sep 23, 1988Mar 30, 1993Helmut PelzerHeat protective, sound permeable lining
US5553417 *Apr 26, 1995Sep 10, 1996Chambers; John E.Fluid distribution panel and method
US5760349 *Apr 22, 1996Jun 2, 1998Dornier GmbhAcoustic absorber having a slotted horn arranged in a pot
US6550574Dec 21, 2000Apr 22, 2003Dresser-Rand CompanyAcoustic liner and a fluid pressurizing device and method utilizing same
US6601672Aug 14, 2001Aug 5, 2003Dresser-Rand CompanyDouble layer acoustic liner and a fluid pressurizing device and method utilizing same
US6918740Jan 28, 2003Jul 19, 2005Dresser-Rand CompanyGas compression apparatus and method with noise attenuation
US7708818 *Oct 11, 2006May 4, 2010Fenix Medical, Llc.Air filtering assembly for use with oxygen concentrating equipment
US8714304 *Sep 21, 2012May 6, 2014Yoshiharu KitamuraSoundproofing plate and soundproofing device permitting air flow
US8893851 *Dec 21, 2011Nov 25, 2014Yoshiharu KitamuraSoundproofing plate which does not obstruct airflow
US20040146396 *Jan 28, 2003Jul 29, 2004Dresser-Rand CompanyGas compression apparatus and method with noise attenuation
US20080087169 *Oct 11, 2006Apr 17, 2008Clark Steven GAir filtering assembly for use with oxygen concentrating equipment
US20090019822 *Feb 16, 2006Jan 22, 2009Bsh Bosch Siemens Hausgerate GmbhFilter arrangement for a range hood
US20090038883 *Jun 7, 2006Feb 12, 2009Kim Young-OkSound-absorbing panel
US20130270035 *Dec 21, 2011Oct 17, 2013Yoshiharu KitamuraSoundproofing plate which does not obstruct airflow
WO2002052109A1 *Jan 30, 2001Jul 4, 2002Dresser-Rand CompanyAcoustic liner and a fluid pressurizing device and method utilizing same
WO2002052110A1 *Nov 8, 2001Jul 4, 2002Dresser-Rand CompanyDouble layer acoustic liner and a fluid pressurizing device and method utilizing same
Classifications
U.S. Classification454/206, 55/446, 96/385, 55/444, 454/906, 181/292, 454/214, 454/213, 55/441
International ClassificationE06B7/10, F16L55/02
Cooperative ClassificationF16L55/02, Y10S454/906, E06B7/10, E06B2007/023
European ClassificationE06B7/10, F16L55/02