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Publication numberUS1784833 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 16, 1930
Filing dateMar 1, 1930
Priority dateMar 1, 1930
Publication numberUS 1784833 A, US 1784833A, US-A-1784833, US1784833 A, US1784833A
InventorsHagemann Edwin C
Original AssigneeWestern Electric Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toroidal inductance device
US 1784833 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 15 1-930. c, HAGEMANN 1,784,833

TOROIDAL INDUCT'ANCE. DEVICE Filed March 1, 1930 2 Sheets5heet 1 A7727 NE) 1939c E. c. HAGEMANN TOROIDAL INDUCTANCE DEVICE Filed March 1, 1950 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Fla. 5

/NI/EN ro/P E. C. HAGEMANN A TTO/PNE Y Patented Dec. 16, 1930 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE EDWIN C. HAG-EMANN, OF SHORT HILLS, NEW JERSEY, ASSIGNOR TO WESTERN ELEC- TRIO COMPANY, INCORPORATED, OF NEW YORK, N. Y., A CORPORATION OF NEW YORK TOROIDAL INDUCTANCE DEVICE Application filed March 1,

This invention relates to the manufacture of inductance devices and more especially to the manufacture of non-magnetic cores on which the inductance devices are wound and non-magnetic core shells employed between magnetic cores and the windings thereon.

An object of the invention isto provide cores or forms having integral spacers for separating the inductance devices wound thereon.

Another object of'the invention is to provide molded toroidal core shellshaving in.-

tegral spacers for separating the inductance devices Wound thereon.

According toone feature ofthe invention, a toroidal core having an H-shaped cross section, around which the windings are applied, .and' having spacers for definitely and accurately locating the individual windings on the core, is molded in a suitable mold with any desirable molding material. Preferably the entire core, including the integral spacers are made of phenolic condensation products.

According to another feature of the invention, a toroidal core shell is formed of any desirable insulating material to fit around the magnetic core and to insulate the windings from the magnetic core. Spacers formed integral with the core shell are provided to definitely and accurately locate the individual windings on the core.

Fig. 3 is a perspective view of the form of core shell with integral spacers thereon,

the core shell being molded in one piece around the magnetic core; 7

Figs. 4 to 6 inclusive show difl'erent methods of forming or molding the core shell in parts so that the parts can be readily assembled over the cores to form a complete cover or shell;

Fig. 7 is a perspective view of a core shell 1930. Serial no. 432,359.

formed from layers of insulating material such as paper; and

Fig. 8 shows a preferred method of build- I ing up the paper layers to form the core shell parts shown in F ig. 7.

Referring to Figs. 1 and 2, the toroidal- Such a cross section makes it possible to readily mold the core and the integral spacers with a relatively small amount of molding material. A U shape could also be used. Four spacers 21, 22, 23 and 24, preferably of the same material as the core 20, are molded integral with the core to form four winding space sections 25, 26, 27 and 28. The inductance devices are wound on the core 20 in eachof the Winding sections 25, 26, 27 and 28. When only two sections are required, the spacers 22 and 24 can be omitted.

Referring to Fig. 3, a cover or shell 30 is molded or formed around the toroidal magnetic core sections 31, 32 and 33 to form an insulating cover or shell over the core lamin'ations 31, 32 and 33. The winding is applied over the shell. The shell 30 may be molded or formed of any suitable insulating material such as phenol plastic and the like. Four spacers 3'4, 35, 36 and 37 are formed or molded integral with the shell 30, to provide four winding space sections. Additional spacers can be provided or fewer used than the number shown, depending upon the number of winding spaces desired.

Fig. 4 is a molded shell part 40 which comprises half of a complete cover or shell. On each shell part 40 is molded or formed integral therewith half of each of the desired spacers 42, 43, 44 and 45. Two core shell parts 40 and the one or more magnetic core laminations such as 31, 32 and 33 in Fig. 3

- are assembled into a unit which will be similar to the unit assembly shown in Fig. 3.

Figs. 5 and 6 show a molding shell part 46 which comprises half of the .shell part 40 4 bly such as shown in Fig. 3. The division between the shell parts 46 is referably made as shown so that-the line of division will not be parallel with the turns of the windings wound thereon.

Fig. 7 shows a formed shell or cover for the magnetic core laminations 31, 32 and 33' formed from shell parts 50. The shell parts 50 are preferably made up of layers of insulatim material such as paper, which is preferably impregnated with suitable insulating material.

Fig. 8 shows a preferred method of constructing the shell parts 50 of layers of insulating material 56, on each end of which are projections 51, 52 and 53. Preferably V-shaped slots 54 are cut in the outer edge and cuts 55 are made in the inner edge of each of the sheets or layers of insulating material in order to facilitate forming the shell parts 50. Preferably the V-shaped slots 54 and the cuts 55 are located as shown in Fig. 8 in each of the insulating layers or sheets so that they will not fall directly over the V-shaped slots and cuts in the layers of insulating material directly above and below. The individual layers 56 are held together after the forming operati0n,,preferably by means of an adhesive of satisfactory electrical characteristics. The projections 51, 52 and 53 are bent or folded back at right angles to the core cover to form the integral spacers. Four of the shell parts 50 are assembled over the magnetic core sections to form the complete cover or shell. Preferably the abutting projections 51, 52 and 53 on the adjacent shell parts 50 are fastened together by means of an adhesive in order to strengthen the integral spacers which they form. When four winding sections of equal size are desired instead of the two winding sections shown in Fig.

7 the shell parts are constructed to form a 90 angle instead of a 180 angle. Preferably there will then be projections 51, 52 and 53 on each end of the 90 section of the shell'part.

Heretofore it has been found diflicult to attach spacers securely and accurately to core forms or shells and to hold them in this manher under commercial winding speeds, particularly with the ever-increasing rate of winding speeds procurable with semi-automatic or full-automatic winding processes' In wooden core forms it has been found a costly operation to position the spacers securely and accurately, as is required for uniformlty of product. This is especially true where a high degree of magnetic and capacity balance is required between difierent' parts of a. coil, as in the case of certain loading coils, or repeating coils for example where low crosstalk and small lon 'tudinal unbal- 'ance is required. The mol ed, 'pressed or that have been described and shown in detail,

but onl b the sec e of the ap nded claims.

Whatl is claimed is: j

1. A new article of manufacture, comprising an annular, member adapted for winding a plurality of inductance devices thereon and having a plurality of spacers of non-mag netic material formed integral with said .annularmember dividing the winding space on said annular member into. a plurality of sections of predetermined size.

2. A new article of manufacture comprising an annular member adapted for winding a plurality of inductance devices thereon and having a plurality of spacers of non-magnetic material formed integral with said annular member dividing the winding space on said annular member into a plurality of sections of predetermined size, said annular member having a cross sectional area less than the annular space enclosed by the windings thereon.

3. A new article of manufacture comprising an annular H-shaped molded member adapted for winding a plurality of inductance devices thereon and having a plurality of integral spacers dividing the winding space on said annular molded member into a plurality of sections of predetermined size.

4. A toroidal core for inductance devices comprisin an annular H-shaped molded member 0 non-magnetic material and a plurality of non-magnetic spacers molded integral with said core and adapted to divide the winding space on said core into a plurality of sections of predetermined size.

5. A toroidal core for inductance devices comprisin an annular H-shaped molded member 0 non-magnetic material and a plurality of non-magnetic spacers molded integral with said core and adapted to divide the winding space on said core into a plurality of sections. 1

6. An annular shaped structure of insulating material adapted to receiva coil winding of a lurality of sections, said insulating materia being formed to provide integral spacers for separating-the ifl'erent winding sections.

' In witness whereof, I hereunto subscribe my name this-24th da of February, 1930. ED G. HAGEMANN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2787743 *Mar 9, 1953Apr 2, 1957American Molded Products CoShell for deflection yoke
US3781741 *Jun 18, 1973Dec 25, 1973Weiner NTransformer assembly
US4603314 *Oct 18, 1983Jul 29, 1986Tdk CorporationInductor
US4639707 *Mar 19, 1986Jan 27, 1987Allied CorporationTransformer with toroidal magnetic core
US4728919 *Oct 29, 1986Mar 1, 1988Siemens AktiengesellschaftMoisture-tight wound ferrite toroidal core with resin envelope
US4763072 *May 30, 1986Aug 9, 1988Kabushikikaisha Tokyo KeikiMagnetic azimuth detector
US6300857Oct 11, 2000Oct 9, 2001Illinois Tool Works Inc.Insulating toroid cores and windings
US6583706Mar 2, 2001Jun 24, 2003Vacon OyjToroidal choking coil
US6611189May 22, 2001Aug 26, 2003Illinois Tool Works Inc.Welding power supply transformer
US6864777Jun 13, 2003Mar 8, 2005Illinois Tool Works Inc.Welding power supply transformer
DE1098610B *May 15, 1957Feb 2, 1961Cie Ind Des TelephonesToroidspule
WO2011026706A1 *Aug 5, 2010Mar 10, 2011Osram Gesellschaft mit beschränkter HaftungElectronic transformer
Classifications
U.S. Classification336/185, 336/232, 336/198, 336/210, 336/234
International ClassificationH01F30/08, H01F17/06, H01F30/06, H01F17/08
Cooperative ClassificationH01F30/08, H01F17/08
European ClassificationH01F30/08, H01F17/08