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Publication numberUS1789129 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 13, 1931
Filing dateDec 8, 1927
Priority dateDec 8, 1927
Publication numberUS 1789129 A, US 1789129A, US-A-1789129, US1789129 A, US1789129A
InventorsApple Vincent G
Original AssigneeApple Vincent G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bar winding
US 1789129 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

'Jfln- 13, 1931- v. G. APPLE 1,789,129

BAR VII NDI NG Filed Dec. 8, 1927 3 Shoetsf-Shqot 1 v. G. APPLE BAR WINDING Filed Dec. a, 1927 sneezs-sheet 2 W TOR.

Jan. 13, 1931. v G. APPLE v 1,789,129

BAR WINDING Filed Dec. 8, 1927 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 .17. 5 E'fi'l 7' az 'ay IN V EN TOR.

Patented Jan. 13, 1931 PATENT ort-*ica VII\`I'CE1\T'.II' G. APPLE, OF DAYTON, OHIO BAR WINDING Application filed December 8, 1927. `Serial No. 238,595.

My invention relates to bar windings for dynamo electric machine elements and s particularly valuable where a commutator is required.

A single turn bar winding is usually arranged in two concentric layers so that the portion of the bars which project beyond the ends of the core may extend, the one end helically right-handedaand the other layer helically left-handed,l and by such an arrangement a bar of one layer may join a widely separated bar of another layer thru their helically projecting ends without nterference or contact with the helical ends of other bars of the winding. It is therefore obvious that the conductors of such a winding need be arranged in two concentric layers only at such portions of their length as are helically disposed, and that at all other portions of the winding the conductors inay be brought circumferentially adjacent in a single cylindrical layer, and one of the objects of my invention is to provide a winding which will take advantage of such a n arrangement to ain points of superority hereinafter specifically described.

Another object of my invention is to effect economy by cutting the winding from sheet stock with substantially no waste of material.

Further objects will be apparent to those skilled in the art as the invention is described in detail and reference is made to the drawings wherein- Fig. 1 shows two blanks of such form that 5 theylmay be cut from sheet stock without waste.

Fig. 2 shows two blanks of another form that may be cut from sheet stock without waste. i

Fig. 3 shows a blank after folding on the broken lines Fig. l.

Fig. 4 shows a blank after folding on the broken lines Fig. 2.

Fig. 5 shows a blank Fig. 3 after it is folded on the broken line running crosswise of its length.

Fig. 6 shows a blank Fig. 4 after it is folded on the broken `ine running crosswise of its length.

Fig. 7 is a cross section taken on lines 7-7 off'Fgs. 5 and 6.

Fig. -8 is a cross section taken on lines 848 of -Figs 5 and 6.

Fig. 9 is a loop which has been formed from a=blank as shown in-Fig. 5 except that the ends have been prolonged and notched to form commutator lugs. i

Fig. 10 is an end View of Fig. 9.

Fig. 1:1 is a loop which has been forned from a blank as shown in Fig. 6 except that the ends have been prolonged and notched to forincommutator lugs.

Fig-12 is an end view of Fig. 11.

Fig. 13 \shows types of core slots to which kpsFigs. 9 and 11 areparticularly adapta e.r x fi F igs. 14 'and 15 show a method of insulating the legs of a loop.

Fig. 16, shows-a -core and a complete set of loops Fig. 9 which have been endwise entered thru thecore slots. i

Fig. 17 shows one pair of conductor legs the ends of Which are relatively displaced so that helical bending maybe effected. *5

Fig. 18'shows the set of loops F i". 14 after all of the ends have been helically tbent.

Fig. 19 shows the outline of a pad which may be added-to the pairs of terminal ends to compose commutator segments. 6?'

Fg. 20 is a cross section taken on line 20 20 ofFig. 19.

Fig. 21 shows a completed armature.

Fig. 1 shows two blanks of such form that when lplaced adjacent as shown they fit closely one into the other. VVhen the length of these blanks is taken from the width of a sheet of stock they may be consecutively cut from the sheet thruout its length without waste.

Fig. 2 shows two blanks of a modified form which may be similarly cut from a sheet without waste.

From'Figs. 1 and 2 it may be seen that the blanks are of nearly uniform width and consequently of nearly uniform current carrying capacity thruout their length.

After cutting blanks Fig. 1 and Fig. 2 they are folded at parts of their length on the broken lines. 20 to 25 inclusive andafter so folding the blank Fig. 1 will appear as in Fig. ""fl the single portions 32 to 37 inclusive being adapted to occupy positions where the winding is arranged'in asingle cylindrical layer.

The blanksl are-.nextfolded on the broken lines 38 and 39 after which blank Fig. 3 .appears as in Fig. 5 and blank Fig. 4 appears as in Fig. 6. i

A cross section taken on lines 7-7 of Fgs,. 5 and 6 is shown in Fig. 7 where 40 and 41 are folded portions of the blank,. 40 .t0,occupy a; position in the outer layer of the winding and all a position in the inner-layer.

F i". 8, a cross section taken-onlines 8'-8 of lFgs-. 'and fshows .the .unfolded portions of the blank as at 42 and 43 which in the windwill occupy =positions ci-rcumferentiall'y adjacent ;to like portions inasingle cylindrical layer.-

It may be seen from .F i .zto S-.inclusive that the blanks .when folde as 'shownare composed .thruout their length oftwo thicknesses Aof thesheet fromwhich they;are=cut.I

The .blanks Figs. -5. and .6 are Vnext spreadto form loops F igs. 9 and 11 Tespectively. The ends 32, 33,' 34 .and-37 'Figs. 3 and 4 however, are -shown as..beingsomewhatl longer and notched as at 44 to permit these ends to ;be utilized as commutator lugs. An end view of. loops Figs.;9 and 211'are shown in -Figsl 10-and 12 respectively.

In Fig..;9 .the :folded two layer'vportion'326 of the -loopiextends not only'thruout the -helically disposed ends but also thruout that part of the loop which must. occupy thescore slots.

In -F ig.. 11 .the -helically .disposed :parts 29. and 30 andIthe-:parts :28 and .31.which will later be helically'disposed are .of a.two layer. configuration asin'Fig; 7 .while the .parts-:35 i and 36 which will occupy the core-slots and the parts 34-and 37 which will becomepart of the commutator are adapted to compose their part of the single cylindrical layer;

In many applications itwill behighly advantageous to have relatively thin and wide conductors circumferenti'ally adjacent infthe core slots rather than thiokernarrowerconductors radiall'y one 4upontheother becausel of the reduction-'ineddycurrentdosses thus.. effected. The 'loop Fig-11 may-.be-profitably appledto such fcases;

Core slots may be of the-open, closed ;or semi-closed 'type -but :the advantages f of the closed and semi-closed types are too 'well i known to require discussion, and Fig. 13 shows core slots or 46 to which loops .Fgs 9 or 11 are particularly applicable. The-slots may lave linings of-insulating materialfas at 47 and a further partiti'oningfiribofinsulation may extend thru the slot as at 48 whenloops Fig.- 9 are used and as at 49 whenloops Fig; 11 are sed, or the insulation may -be applied-di*- rectly to the legs of the loop prior to their entry into the core slots in any manner desired. A preferred method of so applying sheet insulation to a blank Fig. 3 is shown in an enlarged section Fig. 14 wherein a leg 26 has been but partly folded, as at 50 then surrounded by asheet of insulationas at 51 and thentightly'v folded :as in:.Fig.. 15. thuscompletelysurrounding the leg with insulation and at the Sametime holding it tightly in Vplace.-

.Aftejsome form of insulation has been v'applied `either to the core slots or tc the conductor legs, .anumber-of loops corresponding to the number of core .slots may be stacked in cylmtlroal .a'range''e1t;w=ith the. tips of the terminal ends 32; and :33,;or-3liand 37,` slightly cnteredziinto the slots of the core' 52, and as the compositc contour of any twolegsf;

which must enteraslotnisrat some parts aS. n F ig. 'fond at=otl1er-partsas .in Fig. 8.-t

is apparent that the entire winding maybe simultaneously Vendwse entered th'ru the core An arn-.ature w-hch has-reached this..

slots. stage of Vconstruction is showin in'Fig. 16.1;

I'Vhen an enti:e..wincling has bcenfthus.

assembled with thecore 52, provision must be made to,- rearrange thepairs of-terminal..

ends 32 and 33 into other pairs sothat more widelyseparated conductors maybe joineclf by helic-ally. disposingthe projecting. legs thereof. To (lo-this howeveyft asfirst necessary toradiallydisplaccall of the terminalends 32 or 33 oriboth ;sothat :pairs may ,be

circumferentially moved without interfer1-= ence to new: positions separated :from each other anamountcorresponding--to-the front pitch of the winding;

Figl'? shows apair of sonductors project-b from the same slot,-said conductors having been radially dir-:placed relative to each other an anount-necessaryto allow circumferential displacem'ent of the terminal .ends without interference..V

'hen all of the terminals havebeen thus radiallydisplaced to compose two cylindrical layers and the pairs have been circumfercntially separated tie required amount they segment, there being considerable space 59' between achoning pairs of termnals so that it is advisable to combine with each pair a pad preferably of the outline 56 Fig. 19 and having a cross section as at 57 Fig. 20.

VVhen'sucha pad has been combined wth each pair of terminal ends 32 and 33 `afmeans of binding the pads and ends into a commutator must be supplied and this means may consist of insulating material moulded about the ends and pads in a manner to bind them together or of washers having conical interior diameters engaging the notched ends 44 of the terminals and pads in a manner well known to the prior art.

* A complete armature made by my improved method is shown in Fig. 21, and while in the drawing I show a commutator of a diameter as large as the winding, by radial displacement of the terminal ends and corresponding decrease in the thickness of the pads Fig. 20, or by elimination of the pads altogether, a commutator of considerable smaller diameter may be produced, or if notches 44 are eliminated from the terminal ends these ends may be joined to the risers of a conventional commutator, and while in that case I prefer that these ends be helically bent to join the widely separated conductors which compose a winding turn to a commutator bar, they may be shortened and left extending straight out from the core and joined to a commutator bar by separate connectors of involute or other form. By eliminating the notches 44 and using shorter terminal ends as in Figs. 5 and 6 they may be joined by welding or otherwise to complete a Winding which will have great value in its application to dynamo electric machine elements of that character which do not include a commutator in their construction. Other conditions may arise which will make it advisable to eliminate 'the circumferentially adjacent terminal ends altogether and extend the folded portions to the ends of the conductors.

VVhile in the foregoing I have shown and described my method as consisting of a number of steps in a given sequence it is obvious that the steps need not necessarily be taken in the exact sequence named, but may be reversed or rearranged, or, steps described as separately taken may be combined if so desired, and while the loops are particularly applicable to closed or semi-closed core slots since the composite contour formed by placing together a leg of one loop and the opposite leg of another loop is such that they may be endwise entered therethru, said loops may be advantageously used with cores having open slots and may be either endwise or radially entered therein, and while the method, when using closed or semi-closed slots, is applicable to endwise entry and subsequent bending of the projecting ends, when open slots are preferred and used these ends may be separately bent to their final form prior to radial entry into said open slots.

Cases may arise where it will be found advantageous to use offset and folded blanks of the character described to produce single I' condur'ltors instead of loops eomprising two conductors, and such single conductors may be placed in the core slots, and their projecting ends at both ends of the core simultaneously bent to helical formation. The one end of such conductors may be bent prior to endwise entry or both ends may be bent prior to radial entry into the slots. Such other variations in details of construction and in the application of the method as are not limited by prior art and do not depart from the spirit of the invention I desire to cover in the following wherein- I claim 1. Steps in the method of making a winding loop for a bar wound dynamo electric machine element, which consists of cutting a sheet metal blank to such an outline as will leave one portion offset edgewise in one direction from near the niddle of its length to near one end and another portion offset edgewise in the other direction from near the middle of its length to near the other end leaving the outer ends in line, folding the offset portions back upon themselves midway of their width and lengthwise of the blank and folding the blank back upon itself crosswise of the bar and midway of its length.

2. Steps in the method of making a conductor for a bar wound dynamo electric machine element, which consists of cutting a sheet metal blank to such an outline as will leave one portion of its length offset edgewise from adjacent portions, partly folding the offset portion back upon itself midway of its width and lengthwise of the blank, wrapping a strip of sheet insulation around the folded portion and the edges of the strip of insulation tucked in between the folds of the blank and completely folding the blank to hold said insulation in place.

3. Steps in the method of making a conductor for a bar wound dynamo electric machine element, which consists of cutting sheet metal to an irregular outline so as to make a blank having one portion of its length ofl'set edgewise from adjacent portions, and folding the offset portion back upon itself midway of its width and lengthwise of the blank to bring the folded edge in line with one edge of the unfolded portions.

4. As a winding unit of a bar wound dynamo electric machine element, a sheet metal blank having two major portions of its length offset oppositely edgewise and the outer ends in line, the offset portions being folded back tion, said offset portion being folded backv my hand.

upon itself midway of its Width and length-. Wise of the blank with the edges of the strip of sheet insulation held between the folds of the bar.V

6. As a conductor for a bar Wound dynamo electric machine element, a sheet metal blank having one portion of its length offset edgewise with respect to portions adjacent thereto, said offset portion being folded back I, ILpon itself midway of its Width and length Wise of the blank, the folded edge being in line with one edge of the unfolded portions. In testimony Whereof I have hereunto set VINCENT G. APPLE.

Referenced by
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US2722621 *Oct 3, 1950Nov 1, 1955Hartford Nat Bank & Trust CoDevice for deflecting the cathode-ray in cathode-ray tubes
US3694907 *Jul 6, 1970Oct 3, 1972Ragonot EtsMethod of making low inertia rotor for dynamo electric machines
US5801471 *Dec 18, 1995Sep 1, 1998Hill; WolfgangMultiphase electric machine with a winding made of flat-shaped structural conductor parts
US6111329 *Mar 29, 1999Aug 29, 2000Graham; Gregory S.Armature for an electromotive device
US6568065Oct 17, 2001May 27, 2003G & G Technology, Inc.Armature for an electromotive device
US6864613Mar 29, 2000Mar 8, 2005G & G Technology, Inc.Armature for an electromotive device
US6873085Apr 18, 2002Mar 29, 2005G & G Technology, Inc.Brushless motor
US6897594Jan 14, 2003May 24, 2005Denso CorporationStator for a vehicular rotary electric machine and a manufacturing method thereof
US6936948Dec 22, 2003Aug 30, 2005Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp.Electric machine having an integrally continuous stator winding and stator slot bridges
US6958564Feb 24, 2004Oct 25, 2005Thingap CorporationArmature with unitary coil and commutator
US7034429Jan 3, 2005Apr 25, 2006Denso CorporationStator for vehicular rotary electric machine and a manufacturing method thereof
US7287311May 24, 2005Oct 30, 2007Denso CorporationManufacturing method of stator for vehicular rotary electric machine
US7305752Nov 17, 2004Dec 11, 2007Thingap CorporationMethod for fabricating an inductive coil
US8395295 *Oct 8, 2010Mar 12, 2013The Boeing CompanyLaminated sheet winding
US20120086296 *Oct 8, 2010Apr 12, 2012Cleveland Mark ALaminated Sheet Winding
US20130002067 *Jun 30, 2011Jan 3, 2013Bradfield Michael DElectric Machine Module Cooling System and Method
EP1330012A2 *Jan 14, 2003Jul 23, 2003Denso CorporationStator of a rotary electric machine and manufacturing method thereof
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Classifications
U.S. Classification310/201, 29/598
International ClassificationH02K3/12
Cooperative ClassificationH02K3/12
European ClassificationH02K3/12