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Publication numberUS1791222 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 3, 1931
Filing dateJul 16, 1925
Priority dateJul 16, 1925
Publication numberUS 1791222 A, US 1791222A, US-A-1791222, US1791222 A, US1791222A
InventorsFingal C Orr
Original AssigneeNelson Mfg Co Inc L R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sprinkling device
US 1791222 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 3, 1931. F. c. ORR

I v SPRINKLING DEVICE Filed July 16, '1925 //VI/E/V ro/a 7/4 6174 C. file/e yW 1 Patented Feb. 3, 1931 FINGAL C. ORR, F LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA, AEESIGNOB TO L. R. NELSON MFG. ('10.,

INC., A CORPORATION OF ILLINOIS SPRINKLING DEVICE Application filed. July 16,

The present invention relates to sprinklers of the type suited for use on golf courses, and in gardens, orchards and thelike.

The invention has for its principal object i the provision of a simple and eificient rotary sprinkler, in which only a relatively small. percentage of the energy of the water is used in operating the sprinkler.

It will be understood in the consideration of the invention that in present types, much of the energy of the water is used in rotating the sprinkler at high speed and in nebulizing the water. It is a well known fact that a thin, high velocity stream will travel to far I greater distances than will a highly nebulized stream. 1 In high speed rotary sprinklers, additional energy is used in rapidly and continuously changing the direction of the stream.

It is among the objects of the invention to provide a slow, positive and well controlled means for slowly but efficiently rotating a sprinkler so that a minimum energy isconsumed for that purpose. I

Another object of the invention is to provide a sprinkler of the type mentioned'that will serve an exceptionally large area, and accordingly I provide means whereby a far reaching high velocity stream of water may be ejected from a sprinkler during the slow but constant rotation of same, while permitting practically all the potential of the water pressure to be utilized in carrying the water to points well spaced from the sprinkler.

Another object of the invention is to provide a sprinkler head with intermittent rotation in which the intervals of rest and movement follows so very closely. as to give the combined advantages of intermittent and constant rotations respectively."

Another object of the invention is to provide rotating means applicable to either portable or stationary systems.

Still further objects and advantages of my invention will appear hereinafter.

I have illustrated my invention by the accompanying drawings in which:

Fig. 1 isa detail vertical section of apre ferred embodiment of the invention.

1925. Serial No. 48,975.

Fig. 2 is a vertical section of a modified form thereof.

Fig. 3 is a side elevation illustrating another modification of the invention.

More specifically, in carrying out the invention in the form illustrated in Figs. .1 and 2, I provide a chambered member 6 hereinafter known as the rotary sprinkler head. Said member is preferably ovoid or pear shaped, and invariably provides an interior space 7 decreasing in diameter downwardly and terminating in an inlet opening 8. A supply pipe 9 communicates with the inlet opening and the space 7 through a sleeve 10. Said sleeve is screw-threade'd into the inlet opening, as at 11, and is arranged to travel or rotate with the head.

The supply pipe carries a collar 12 in which the sleeve is revoluble. A ring 14, carried by the lower end of the sleeve, coacts with a packing ring 15 to provide a. fluidtight swivel joint permittingthe head to rotate with regard to the stationary supply It will be apparent now that the water pressure tends to hold the rings in leakproof contact and thereby produces slight friction betweenthe two parts.

The head carries an outwardly ranging reaction arm 16, so that water may pass from space 7, through the arm and escape in a small jet through an orifice 17 The reaction of the escaping water produces a tendency for rotation, on the part of the head. However in conformance with a salient feature of the invention, the orifice, and other parts are so proportioned and co-related that the reactionary effect of the arm 16 isnot quite capable of imparting proper rotation, if any to the sprinkler head.

A nozzle 18 adapted to deliver a far-reaching undisturbed jet, projects radially from the member 6. Said nozzle is inclined upwardly to give maximum distance to the jet. Obviously, the reaction of water issuing from the jet, sets up a lateral thrust between the sleeve and collar and causes atendency for the parts to bind so that free rotation of the sprinkler head is normally prevented.

WVithin the space 7 I provide a heavy object preferably in the form of a ball 20. Said object, in the embodiment described, is loosely contained therein, so that it is free to be tossed about by the water flowing through the space to the nozzle. Naturally the tendency of the object is to gravitate toward the inlet opening 8, and in so doing it interferes with, and temporarily shuts 0d or reduces the flow of water. Almost immediately that i does so, the water lifts it and may even hurl it forcibly against an upper surface 22 diametrically opposite the inlet opening. Preferably said surface is provided by an anvil member 28, which depends into an opening 24, in the upper part of the head, and which is held in position by bolts 25. The anvil member serves as a removable closure for the opening in the upper portion of the chambered member 6.

in the operation of the device, the reaction of the jet issuing from the nozzle, and the natural friction of relatively movable parts, makes it normally impossible for the reaction of the jet issuing from the reaction arm, to rotate the head. As the ball is thrown about in the hollow head, it strikes the anvil member, and possibly the side walls of the head, thereby producing a certain amount of vibration and at the same time intermittently interfering with the flow of water.

Apparently the constantly changing forces set up by the vibration resulting from the hammering of the ball within the hollow head, as well as the changes in effective reaction of the nozzle, and changes in flow of water, all results in the unbalanced effect of the parts being periodically overcome. hatever the actual effect may be, the fact remains that the pounding of the ball against the anvil member 23 and the hollow head sets up a state of vibration on the part of the revoluble head sufficient to overcome that degree of friction that is holding or tending to hold the head against rotation and, the result is, that the head revolves slowly and distributes its jet accurately over a large area. The rotation is not constant but is composed of short and quick movements of a degree at a time, said movements occurring with considerable frequency.

As hereinbefore stated, the relative sizes of the parts of the device, and particularly the size of the reactive jet orifice 17, are such that under normal conditions, or without the hammering member 20, the head will not revolve, for the friction produced between the parts 10, 12, 14 and 15 is such as to hold the head against rotation. However, the reactive force developed by the jet issuing through orificel? is almost sufficient to cause the head to rotate, and I employ the ball within the hollow head to produce the necessary degree of vibration to break or overcome that small degree of friction that is holding the head against rotation. This, when the vibration resulting from the impact of the ball with the anvil, overcomes or breaks the holding force or friction, said head will, for an instant rotate and then hesitate or stop until vibration is produced to bring about a repetition of the movements just described, and thus the head will slowly rotate with an intermittenthesitating movement.

In the form of the invention shown in Fig. 2, all parts are similar to those in Fig. 1 except that the anvil member in this instance is provided with depending stem 26, while the ball 20-a is provided with a drilled hole 27 through which the stem extends. In this case, the movement of the ball is vertical. When the ball is thrown up against the anvil, the friction between the relatively revoluble parts is no doubt increased, but as it descends, the How of water is temporarily reduced or halted, allowing the reaction jet to move the revoluble head slightly. Almost immediately the ball is thrown upward again to temporarily terminate rotary movement.

In the modification illustrated in Fig. 3, the chambered member 6a is fitted onto the end of reaction arm 16 and projecting from said chambered member is a short reaction jet nozzle 66. In this arrangement, the vibration of the loose member within chambered member 6a is amply suflicient to slowly but steadily rotate arm 16.

It will be apparent now that I have provided a simple revoluble sprinkler head adapted to deliver water over a very considerable area and to utilize a favorably high percentage of the energy of the water for d1- recting same to remote places, rather than consuming the energy in rotating the head at high speed, and it will also be apparent that with my invention I am enabled to cause a low powered, unbalanced revoluble member to rotate slowly and practically steadily in spite of friction and one-sided reaction end, while I have shown and described a specific embodiment of my invention, and modifications thereof, 1 do not limit myself to any specific construction or arrangements of parts, and may alter same if desired without enlarging the scope of the invention, within the appended claims.

I claim as my'invention:

1. A sprinkler of the character described comprising a supply pipe, a chamberedhead rotatably mounted on said pipe and provided with laterally and angularly disposed "rotation imparting means communicating therewith, said head being' axially disposed with respect to said pipe, a vibrator within said chamber and free to move in all directions therein,.and an impact surface locatedwithin said chambered head and positioned to be struck by said vibrator.

2. A sprinkler of the character described comprising a supply pipe, a chambered sprinkler head rotatably mounted on said pipe and axially arranged with respect thereto, reaction means for revolving said head about said pipe as an axis, a vibrator movable within said chamber, and an impact surface located. within said chamber and positioned to be struck by said vibrator.

3. A sprinkler of the character described comprising a supply pipe, a chambered sprinkler head of ovoid shape having its smaller end rotatably mounted on said pipe, said head being axially disposed with respect to said pipe, reaction means for revolving said head about said pipe as an axis, a vibrator movable within said chamber, and an impact surface located within the en larged portion of said chamber and positioned to be struck by said vibrator.

l. A sprinkler of the character described comprising a supply pipe, a chambered sprinkler head. rotatably mounted on said pipe and concentrically arranged with respect thereto, a nozzle projecting from said head and communicating with the interior thereof, a reaction arm also projecting from said head and communicating with the chamber thereof, a vibrator movable within said chamber, and an anvil member carried by said head and having an impact surface of substantial area within said chamber and positioned to be struck by said vibrator.

5. A. sprinkler of the character described comprising a supply pipe, a chambered sprinkler head rotatably mounted on said pipe and axially arranged with respect thereto, reaction means for revolving said head about said pipe as an axis, an anvil member forming the top of said chamber and having an impact surface of substantial area, and a vibrator movable within said chamber so as to be free to strike said impact surface.

6. A sprinkler of the character described comprising a supply pipe, a collar secured to one end thereof, a sleeve rotatably mounted in said collar, a chambered head of ovoid form having its smaller end secured to said sleeve and having its larger end provided with an impact surface, reaction means connected with said chambered head for imparting rotation to the head and the said sleeve, and a movable impact member located within said chambered head.

7 A vibrating element for connection with a rotatable sprinkling device including a chambered head of approximately ovoid shape provided with an inlet opening at its smaller end and having a laterally and angularly disposed discharge nozzle, the top of said chamber having an approximately flat internal impact surface, and an impact member free to move in all directions within said chamber, so that inflowing water will cause said impact member to strike said impact surface and thereby impart vibrations to said head.

8. A sprinkler of the character described comprising a supply pipe, a chambered head of approximately ovoid shape rotatably mounted on said pipe and axially disposed with respect to said pipe and provided with an inlet opening at its smaller end and a laterally and angularly disposed discharge nozzle, the top of said chamber having an approximately fiat internal impact surface in spaced relation to said supply pipe and also in line with the axis thereof, and an impact member free to move in all directions within said chamber, so that infiowing water will cause said impact member to strike said impact surface and thereby impart vibrations to said head.

In testimony whereof I afliX my signature.

FINGAL C. ORR.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2536440 *Apr 16, 1946Jan 2, 1951Hobson Ltd H MFuel distributing valve
US3038667 *Nov 9, 1959Jun 12, 1962Die Casters LtdNozzles or jets for rotary sprinklers
US3598316 *Feb 25, 1970Aug 10, 1971Johnson Harold CRotary fluid-sprayer
US6302335 *Sep 22, 2000Oct 16, 2001Timothy G. OrmistonLawn sprinkler system
US6409095 *Mar 20, 2001Jun 25, 2002Bird Brain, Inc.Glass bulb attachment for decorative sprinkler
US6439478Mar 3, 2000Aug 27, 2002Bird Brain, Inc.Adapter for upright sprinkler with rotating head
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/260, 239/246, 239/DIG.500, 239/262
International ClassificationB05B3/06
Cooperative ClassificationB05B3/06, Y10S239/05
European ClassificationB05B3/06