Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1791359 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 3, 1931
Filing dateSep 11, 1928
Priority dateSep 11, 1928
Publication numberUS 1791359 A, US 1791359A, US-A-1791359, US1791359 A, US1791359A
InventorsArthur Henriksen
Original AssigneeArthur Henriksen
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Multicolor soap
US 1791359 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 3, 1931. A. HENRIKSEN MULTICOLOR SOAP Filed Sept. 11, 1928 TOR.

IKSQN N .7 W R m N 1 a A TTORNEY Patented Feb. 3, 1931 -UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE MULTIGOLOR SOAP Application filed September 11, 1928. Serial No. 305,233.

This invention relates generally to soaps and has more particular reference to a novel cake of soap arranged for presenting a distinctive appearance.

The invention has for an object the provision of an article of the class mentioned which is of simple durable construction, desirable in use and eflicient in action, and which can be manufactured and sold at a reasonable cost.

The invention proposes to design a cake of soap of white color for example and insort a block of soap of any color therein to make a soap showing a center of any shape that could be easily recognized. Cakes of soap generally, today, are of a solid .color or moddled appearance. As it is now the name of the soap is stamped on and as the soap washes away the name is lost. With the instant arrangement, however, it could be a white soap with a round centerpiece of green soap. The manufacturer could say, You will know our soap by the green center. Very obviously, the cake of soap may be en- F tirely used up and the distinction mark remains until the end.

It is proposed that after the soap comes out of the plodder and is cut to the right size for stamping, it should go to a machine that would punch a hole of round or square shape in it. Another piece of soap of white color or any other color may be punched out, of such size and shape so as to fit within this hole. In the cake of soap this can be done by having a plodder plate or die with an opening similar to the hole, the dimension naturally slightly less so that it can be inserted easily or can be punched out of other fiat pieces by a punch. It might also be advisable to fill up the hole within the cake of soap by pouring melted soap into it, such as transparent soap.

When one piece of one color, or white or black soap has been placed in the opening of a differently colored, or white cake of soap, it is readily seen that this organization provides a soap with a characteristic center bearing the manufacturers trademark.

F or further comprehension of the invention, and of the object and advantages thereof, reference will be had to the following description and accompanying drawings, and to the appended claims in which the various novel features of the invention are more particularly set forth.

In the accompanying drawing forming a material part of this disclosure Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a cake of soap constructed according to this invention.

Fig.- 2 is a transverse vertical sectional view, taken on the line 22 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a perspective view of the block of soap inserted in the opening in the cake of soap.

Fig. 4 is a plan view of a modified form of the article.

Fig. 5 is a perspective view of the center soap piece thereof.

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary sectional view similar to Fig. 2, but showing a modification thereof.

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary plan view of a cake of soap constructed according to modified form.

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view, taken on the line 88 of Fig. 7

The reference numeral 10 indicates generally a cake of soap of any shape, design or 30 construction, formed with a central opening 11, and a block of soap 13 of a shape corresponding with this opening is shown engaged in the opening. The cake of Soap 10 may be of any color, as indicated on the drawing it is of a pink shade. Similarly, the block of soap 13 may be of any color different than the cake for forming a distinction, as indicated on the drawing which is shown black. The opening 11 and the block of soap 13 is 00 shown of elliptical shape in horizontal cross section and having lateral straight sides 14.

It is readily seen that as this cake of soap is used and becomes smaller in size, the distinctive block 13 will always remain within the cake and be correspondinly used, until the cake is entirely used up. Thus users of the soap, at all times, having a reminding feature that the particular soap being used is the product of a certain manufacturer.

In Figs. 4 and 5, a modified form of the article has been shown. The block of soap 13 is shown within a cake 10. This cake of soa has a square central opening 11 and the lock 13' is of a shape for engaging within this opening. As shown on the drawing, the color of the soap 10 is white and the block 13' is black. The horizontal cross section of the block 13 is of rectangular shape and the vertical sides are straight as indicated by the numeral 14:.

In Fig. 6, a cake of soap 10 has been illustrated with a block 13 engaged therein. The soap 10 has an irregular opening 11 for receiving the block 13. It is pointed out that the lateral sides of the block of soap 13 are inclined downwardly from the top down to the center indicated by the numeral 15, and inclined inwardly from the center down to the bottom as indicated by numeral 16. This construction prevents accidental knocking out of the center block of soap 13. The soap may be used and obviously during use he comes" thinner but since the angle occurring in the lateral sides of the block 13 is at the center it will always serve to hold the block against displacement.

In Figs. 7 and 8, another modified form of the article has been shown in which a cake of soap 10 is formed with a central opening 11 of cylindrical form. A block of soap 13 is shown engaged within this opening. The block of soap is formed with side extensions 17 extending its entire height and shaped serrated on its outer sides as indicated at 18. The cake of soap 10 is formed withrecesses 18 for receiving the extensions and the serrated faces of the block of soap. This construction is such that the soap may be irregularly used and still the block 13 would be held against being forced out accidentally. If for instance, the top of the soap was continually used, it is readily seen that the soap may be used nearly all the way to the bottom without any danger of the central block being knocked therefrom.

While one opening and one block of soap has been shown within the cakes of soap, it is not intended as a limitation. The cake of soap may be provided with several openings and several blocks engaged within these openings.

While I have shown and described the preferred embodiment of my invention, it is to be understood that I do not limit myself to'the precise construction herein disclosed and the right is reserved to all changes and modifications coming within the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new, and desire to secure by United States Letters Patent is 1. As an article of manufacture, a cake of soap with a circular aperture extending completely through from one side to the other and two opposite niches on the rim of the circular aperture which are formed with a plurality of pyramidic serrations at right angles to the said cakes vertical height, and a block of soap snugly engaged in the aperture and having lateral pyramidic serrations at right angles to the longitudinal length of the aperture and interengaging the said serrations for preventing accidental knocking out or rotating of the block of soap.

2. As an article of manufacture, a cake of soap with an aperture extending completely through from one side to the other and formed with serrations at right angles to its vertical height, and a block of soap snugly engaged in the aperture and having side extensions, said side extensions having lateral serrations at right angles to the longitudinal length of the aperture and interengaging the said serrations for preventing accidental displacement or rotation of said block.

In testimony whereof I have affixed my signature.

ARTHUR HENRIKSEN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2423435 *Sep 25, 1943Jul 8, 1947Block Wilton AMethod of making soap cake having desired insignia
US4201743 *Aug 4, 1977May 6, 1980Colgate-Palmolive CompanyMethod of making soap bars
US4460490 *Dec 17, 1981Jul 17, 1984Jeyes Group LimitedLavatory cleansing blocks
US6506369May 16, 2001Jan 14, 2003The Gillette CompanyCosmetic or drug in applicator device that as the surface wears away through use, a visual usage indicator in the container shows that a predetermined portion of the composition has been consumed.
US6723269Feb 15, 2001Apr 20, 2004The Gillette CompanyMethods of manufacturing personal care products
US6752982Sep 9, 2002Jun 22, 2004The Gillette CompanyVolatile silicone, a high melting wax, and antiperspirant salt.
US6776981Jan 29, 2002Aug 17, 2004The Gillette CompanyPersonal care product
US6838032Feb 15, 2001Jan 4, 2005The Gillette CompanyMethods of manufacturing personal care products
US6902338 *Dec 26, 2002Jun 7, 2005Unilever Home & Personal Care Usa Division Of Conopco, Inc.Skin cleansing, aesthetic, and skin benefit bars in a porous pouch
US7229611Aug 1, 2003Jun 12, 2007The Gillette CompanyDisclosed are clear antiperspirant or deodorant compositions that include visible capsules.
US8048406Feb 15, 2001Nov 1, 2011The Dial CorporationAntiperspirant
DE4103633A1 *Feb 7, 1991Jun 4, 1992Heinz Joachim Dipl Ing NotterSupport surface for bars of soap - comprises transparent impermeable layer attached to one side of soap, allowing it to dry out quickly after use
EP1579846A2 *Feb 14, 2002Sep 28, 2005The Gillette CompanyPersonal care product
Classifications
U.S. Classification510/146, 510/440
International ClassificationC11D13/08, C11D13/00
Cooperative ClassificationC11D13/08
European ClassificationC11D13/08