Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1792347 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 10, 1931
Filing dateJan 9, 1926
Priority dateFeb 9, 1925
Publication numberUS 1792347 A, US 1792347A, US-A-1792347, US1792347 A, US1792347A
InventorsGustav Zecher
Original AssigneePhilips Nv
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Producing light of different colors
US 1792347 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb..10, 1931. G. ZECHER 1,792,347

PRODUCING LIGHT OF DIFFERENT COLORS Filed Jan. 9, 1926 .ZVENTOR.

l for example Patented Feb. 10, 1931 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE GUSTAV ZECHER, OF EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS, ASSIGNOR TO N. V. PHILIPS GLOEIIJAMPENFABRIEKEN, OF EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS 1 PRODUCING LIGHT OF DHFERENT COLORS Application filed January 9, 1926,

It is known to introduce into discharge tubes with positive column light or so-called luminous tubes, containing a rare gas such, for example, as neon or argon, a substance, mercury, the vapour of which exercises a certain influence on the color of the light radiated. It is also known that in the case'ofluminous tubes filled with neon and mercury, the light has a substantially 1 red color when the circuit is closed for the it is the light of the rare gas first time. This color gradually changes into blue because the mercury evaporates in consequence of the rise of temperature. If the current is interrupted, the mercury gradually condenses again so that when after some seconds the circuit is closed again, the said phenomena are produced anew. It has been suggested already to make use thereof for obtaining a lighting with changing hues. Which of the substances present in the tube, predominates in the radiation of light, de pends on various factors, for example, on the current density, the temperature and the diameter of the tube.

According to the invention, this circumstance is made use of for producing a peculiar effect which, for example, is particularly suitable for an artistic lighting or for purso poses of advertisement.

e invention essentially consists'in rendering the current density within the tube variable with respect to space, said density being so chosen that at the high current density and at the low current density it is the light of the vapour that predominates.

The different regions of the tube, in which the current density is also diiferent, will emit light of diiferent colors. In the case of a filling of neon and mercury, for example, the regions of great current density Will substantially emit the red neon light whereas the regions of smaller current density substantially yield the blue mercury light. v

In this case it may be so arranged that a current of almost constant intensity flows through a tube which in different. places has different cross sections.

An installationembodying the invention v3. The nature and Serial No. 80,389, and in the Netherlands February 9, 1925.

is diagrammatically represented, on the accompanying drawing. i

In the drawing is shown, by way of example, a tube which permanently emits at the same time light of several colors. The tube is fed, through a steadying resistance 4, by a transformer 5 and is provided in the usual manner with metal electrodes 2 and pressure of the gas filling is so chosen in relation to the diameter of the tube that the current intensity has the desire values. The filling may, for example, consist of neon and mercury.

The tube is constructed in such a manner that towards one of its ends the diameter gradually increases, which causes that the light inthe narrow end is, for example, of a bright red and, towards the other end of the tube, gradually "changes into blue. It is obvious that, remaining within the scope of the invention, it is possible to introduce all fects with-tubes of the kind under consideration.

What I claim is:

1. A discharge tube for the generation of in positive column light which in addition to at least one rare gas also contains at least one vapour, the tube-comprising a part having an inner diameter gradually increasing from one end of said part to the other.

2. A discharge tube for the generation of positive column light which contains an inert gas and mercury vapor, the tube comprising a part having an inner diameter gradually 1ncreasing from one end of said part to the other, that at one point the radiation of the gas predominates and at another point the radiation of the vapor predominates.

' In testimony whereof I afiix my signature at the city of Eindhoven, this 17th day oi December, A. D. 1925.

G ST V ZEC E

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2761086 *Aug 29, 1952Aug 28, 1956Gen ElectricElectric discharge lamp
US3428914 *Jan 25, 1965Feb 18, 1969Spectra PhysicsGas lasers with plasma tube having variable cross-section and discharge current
US3498714 *Jun 7, 1967Mar 3, 1970Dennison Mfg CoGas discharge lamp
US5132590 *Oct 17, 1990Jul 21, 1992Masaaki KimotoGas discharge tube capable of lighting in different colors
US5410216 *Apr 10, 1992Apr 25, 1995Kimoto; MasaakiMercury and neon vapors; interior photoluminescent coating; pulse current
US5523655 *Aug 31, 1994Jun 4, 1996Osram Sylvania Inc.Neon fluorescent lamp and method of operating
US5557112 *Jul 21, 1995Sep 17, 1996Light Sources, Inc.Dual radiation ultraviolet lamp
US5565685 *Jul 21, 1995Oct 15, 1996Light Sources, Inc.Dual intensity ultraviolet lamp
US6635991 *Sep 15, 1999Oct 21, 2003U.S. Philips CorporationMethod of adjusting the light spectrum of a gas discharge lamp, gas discharge lamp, and luminaire for said lamp
US6919676Jun 16, 2003Jul 19, 2005Voltarc Technologies Inc.Discharge lamp having overlaid fluorescent coatings and methods of making the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification313/634, 313/642
International ClassificationH01J61/33
Cooperative ClassificationH01J61/33
European ClassificationH01J61/33