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Publication numberUS1792612 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 17, 1931
Filing dateJul 13, 1928
Priority dateJul 13, 1928
Publication numberUS 1792612 A, US 1792612A, US-A-1792612, US1792612 A, US1792612A
InventorsStaley Joseph H
Original AssigneeStaley Joseph H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Airplane-engine stand
US 1792612 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

17, 1931. H STALEY 1,792,612

AIRPLANE ENGINE STAND Filed July 15, 1928 IHVEHTUR, Joseph H. Ql'd/eJ mmymm,

Patented Feb. 17, 1931 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE Application filed July 18,

This invention relates to means for holding motors while being built or overhauled. In recent years the rotary type of motor for airplanes has been rapidly developed, but

the factory equipment for assembhng such motors had not kept pace with the motor development, and no satisfactory meansfor holding all the types of motors by one unit was available prior to my invention hereinbelow described, which is a development from my earlier inventions as embodied in the Patent Numbers 1,444,757 and 1,469,734.

Airplane motors have propellers and other parts projecting therefrom as well as peculiarly shaped mounting bases, all of which conditions are not encountered in automobile motor practice, so that a stand that has heretofore accommodated an automobile motor could not be employed in assembling and working on the airplane motor.

My invention rovides a motor stand that will receive and old any type of rotary motor as well as the common V ty e. The stand will permit bodily turning of t e motor being assembled thereon so as to give easy accessibility to all sides of the motor. These and other objects of my invention will be better understood by the following description as illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in

so which- Fig. 1 is a side perspective view of a motor stand embodying my invention;

Fig. 2, a perspective view of the motor support frame only with a modified form of motor support;

Fig. 3, a perspective view of the motor support frame only showing a still further modified form of motor support; and

Fig. 4, a central longitudinal, vertical section on the line 44 in Fig. 1.

Like characters of reference indicate like parts throughout the several views of the drawing.

I form a stand base having the end standards 10 and 11 adjustably spaced apart by the two bars 12 and 13 and mounted on casters 14, as employed in my earlier motor stand. Between the upper ends of the standards 10 and 11, I rockab y swing a frame preferably made of angle iron members.

1828. Serial No. 292,500.

This frame comprises the two end bars 15 and 16, bolted to the brackets 17 and 18 re spectively to have one leg of the angle turned downwardly and the other leg horizontally dis osed and resting across the shoulders 19 an 20 on the brackets, the bolts 21 being passed through the horizontal legs vertically into the shoulders. These horizontal legs of the bars 15 and 16 are provided with a plurality of holes 22 therethrough spaced apart substantially throughout their lengths.

Side bars 23 and 24 each having a horizontally disposed leg provided with a plurality of holes 30 therethrough have their ends resting on the top sides of the end bars 15 and 16 with removable bolts 25 passing therethrough so that the bars 23 and 24 may be variably spaced apart one from the other as desired by placing the ends of the side bars over the selected holes 22 in the end bars 15 and 16, the bars 23 and 24 being shown in the drawing as being spaced the maximum distance apart as determined by the lengths of the end bars. 4

The frame formed as described by the end bars 15 and 16, and side bars 23 and 24 is thus carried by the end brackets 17 and 18. These end brackets are rotatably held between the standards 10 and 11 so that the frame may be revolved about its longitudinal axis.

Referring to Fig. 1, a pair of transverse bars 26 and 27 are provided which may be removably bolted by their ends to and across between the side bars 23 and 24 to have any desired spacin between the bars 26 and 27,

by moving the ars along the side bars 23 and 24 and placing the bolts 28 through the bar ends and selected holes 30. The bars 26 and 27 have a plurality of holes 31 through their horizontally disposed legs.

A plurality of brackets 32 are provided, here shown as four in number. These brackets have a hole 33 in the outer end and are slotted throu bout the greater part of their lengths. In ig. 1, two of these brackets 32 are carried on each of the transverse bars 26 and 27 by the bolts 34 passed through the slots of the brackets and through selected holes 31. The ends of the brackets 32 having the holes therethrough are directed inwardly between the bars 26 and 27 to be adjustably moved to have the holes 33 match the corresponding holes provided in the base of the motor (not shown to be held on the stand. It is evident, t erefore, that the bars 26 and 27 and brackets 32 may be adjustably positioned to meet a very wide range of motor bases.

While I have here shown and described a construction with holes through the bars and bolts through the holes for retaining adjustments, other well known clamping and securing means may be substituted.

Should the bars 26 and 27 interfere with the motor assembly as might be the case in certain V type motors, the bars 26 and 27 may be removed and the brackets 32 adjustably bolted directly to the side bars 23 and 24, as in Fi 3. Where an assembly plant or repair base andles but one type and size of motor,

it is possible in some cases to dispense with the bars 26 and 27, and brackets 32, and employ a plate 35, Fig. 2, which is formed to receive the base of that particular motor only.

Having described my invention in the form as now best known to me, it is obvious that structural changes may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention, and I therefore do not desire to be limited to the precise form as described and shown, nor any more than may be required by the following claims.

I claim:

1. In a motor stand, a pair of standards, an end angle bar rotatably carried by one of said standards, an end angle bar rotatabl carried by the other of said standards, a pair of side angle bars carried by and between said end bars, said side bars being spaced apart one from the other along said end bars, each of said side bars having a horizontally disposed longitudinal member and motor support means substantially in the same plane as the frame carried by the side bars adjustably secured thereto.

2. In a motor stand, a pair of standards, an end angle bar rotatably carried by one of said standards, an end angle bar rotatablycarried by the other of said standards, a pair of side angle bars carried by and between said end bars, said side bars being spaced apart one from the other along said end bars, each of said bars having a horizontally disposed longitudinal member and motor support means carried by the side bars adjustably secured thereto, said support means comprising a plurality of adjustable brackets capable of being swung and extended in planes parallel with and approximately that of the frame but resisting transverse displacement.

3. In a motor stand, a pair of spaced apart side angle bars each having a horizontally disposed member with a plurality of holes therethrough, a pair of end angle bars spaced apart and receiving the ends of said side bars, said end bars each having a plurality of holes through a horizontall disposed member, a bracket for each end ar having a shoulder supporting and secured to its end bar, a air of standards rotatably engaging said brac ets therebetween, and motor support means arallel with and substantially in the same p ane as the frame carried by and adapted to be selectively positioned along and secured to said bars by bolts entering said holes therein.

4. A new article of manufacture for airplane motor assembly work comprising an adjustable frame formed by two end angle bars and two side angle bars, a member of each of said bars having means whereby the said bars may be selectively secured one to the other to define openings therebetween of varying areas, and havin a plurality of brackets adapted to be adjustably extended in and out over said openings in substantially the same plane as the frame.

5. A new article of manufacture for airplane motor assembly work comprising an adjustable frame formed by two end angle bars and two side angle bars, a member of each of said bars havin one or more holes therethrough whereby tie said bars may be selectively bolted onto the other to define openings therebetween of varying areas, and having a transverse member between said side bars intermediate said end bars adapted to be selectively held along said side bars as determined by the holes therein.

6. A new article of manufacture for airplane motor assembly work comprising an adjustable frame formed by two end angle bars and two side angle bars, a member of each of said bars having a plurality of holes therethrou h whereby the said bars may be selectively olted one to the other to define openings therebetween of varying areas, and having transverse bars between said side bars intermediate said end bars adapted to be selectively held along said side bars as determined by the holes therein, and brackets rotatably and extendably carried by and at selected points along said transverse bars in a plane parallel with and approximately the same as said frame.

7. In a stand for airplane engines, a pair of standards, brackets supported by the standards, said brackets having shoulders, a frame rockably supported between the standards on the shoulders of the brackets to be capable of being revolved between the standards, and engine engaging means carried by the frame comprising an engine support confined substantially to the engine contacting plane of the frame and formed to permit complete assembly of all component parts and accessories into a complete engine before its removal therefrom, said engine being carried entirely by said sup ort.

8. In a stand for airp ane engines, a pair of standards, a frame rockably sup orted between the standards to be capable 0 being revolved therebetween, and engine engaging means carried by the frame comprising an engine support confined to the plane of the frame and formed to permit complete assembly of all component parts and accessorles into a complete engine before its removal therefrom, said engine bein carried entirely by said support, and said support being composed of members adjustable angularly and toward and away one from the other all in the plane of the carrying frame.

9. In a stand for airplane engines, a pair of standards, a frame rockably supported between the standards to be capable of being revolved therebetween, and engine engaging means carried by the frame comprising an engine support confined to the plane of the frame and formed to permit complete assembly of all component parts and acces sories into a complete engine before its removal therefrom, said engine being carried entirely by said support, and said support comprising a plurality of relatively narrow arms having longitudinal slots, and bolts removably passed through said slots at selected positions over and engaging said frame, said arms being adjustably retained by said bolts within the frame plane whereby the arms may be shifted about angularly and in and out toward the engine to be supported thereby to engage said engine at points permit tin sori es without interference from said arms.

In testimony whereof I aifix my signature.

JOSEPH H. STALEY.

complete assembly of parts and acces-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2427133 *Nov 17, 1943Sep 9, 1947Grabner Walter JWork holding and fabricating apparatus
US2497921 *Oct 24, 1947Feb 21, 1950Ballard Lester WMethod of applying protector collars to drill pipes
US2536239 *Nov 27, 1946Jan 2, 1951Western Electric CoPanel holding apparatus
US2559028 *Mar 31, 1947Jul 3, 1951Oberwegner Alfred RWashing machine supporting carriage
US2588810 *Jun 23, 1947Mar 11, 1952Clifford J DietrichAssembling aid for constructing frameworks
US2846761 *Mar 16, 1953Aug 12, 1958Evans Charles HowardRepair tables
US3063706 *Jul 28, 1958Nov 13, 1962Houdaille Industries IncEngine repair stand
US3124346 *Jan 2, 1962Mar 10, 1964 foster
US3126188 *Oct 23, 1961Mar 24, 1964 dieas
US3744138 *Nov 15, 1971Jul 10, 1973Schuler Gmbh LRotary layout stand
US4686925 *Dec 5, 1985Aug 18, 1987Stuck Andrew GRotary boat repair apparatus
US4745253 *Dec 11, 1986May 17, 1988Charmilles Technologies S.A.Device and process designed to automatically hold up and fix in position the parts cut out of a workpiece during electroerosion machining to rough dimensions and application involving the automatic removal of the cutout parts
US4880194 *Jul 21, 1987Nov 14, 1989John GeiseApparatus and method for supporting articles
US4900000 *Sep 1, 1988Feb 13, 1990Solberg Dean CSupport for minature objects
US5042762 *Apr 30, 1990Aug 27, 1991Kerr Gary TComputer printer stand
US5456434 *Dec 13, 1993Oct 10, 1995Lomauro; Stephen H.Engine head stand assembly
US5549287 *Jun 14, 1994Aug 27, 1996Loucks; Howard C.Automobile body parts holder assembly
US5603474 *May 16, 1995Feb 18, 1997Weber; George E.Adjustable support for hobbyist
US5662591 *May 26, 1995Sep 2, 1997The Johns Hopkins UniversityApparatus for exercising and measuring strength of a patient's limb and an adjustable pivot clamp
US6109600 *Dec 19, 1997Aug 29, 2000Brian P. YostApparatus for supporting a workpiece
US6170672 *Jun 23, 1999Jan 9, 2001Michael R. BoettcherAdjustable storage rack for anilox rolls
US6918579 *Apr 3, 2003Jul 19, 2005Atop S.P.A.Workpiece carrier for production lines, or pallet, with adjustable supports
US20130128425 *Nov 24, 2011May 23, 2013Jia-He ChengBack Frame And Backlight System Of Flat Panel Display Device
WO2012032419A2 *Sep 13, 2011Mar 15, 2012Aptfor A.S.Flexible modular system for building, maintenance, transport and storage of airplane models
Classifications
U.S. Classification269/55, 269/296, 248/185.1, 248/670, 248/676
International ClassificationB25H1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB25H1/0007
European ClassificationB25H1/00B