Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1792992 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 17, 1931
Filing dateDec 11, 1929
Priority dateDec 11, 1929
Publication numberUS 1792992 A, US 1792992A, US-A-1792992, US1792992 A, US1792992A
InventorsLerch Theodore E
Original AssigneeLerch Theodore E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vacuum cleaner
US 1792992 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

99b. 17, 1931. T. E. LERCH 4 9,792,992

VACUUM CLEANER Filed Dec. 11, 1929 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Macaw 1p Feb. 17, 1931. LERCH 1,792,992

VACUUM CLEANER Filed Dec. 11, 1929 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented Feb. 17, 1931' PATENT OFFICE THEODORE E. LERCH, OI IPALMYRA, PENNSYLVANIA VACUUM CLEANER Application filed December 11, 1929. Serial No. 413,380.

This invention relates to vacuum cleaners generally and \particularly to the nozzle therefor.

In the use of vacuum cleaners wherein brushes are provided for sweeping dirt from carpets or the like, it has been found advantageous to provide a heater bar adapted to strike against the surface of the carpet to be cleaned in order to loosen dirt which has become embedded therein. Such beaters have formerly been operated by suitable mechanical means but it has been found that moving parts thereof soon become worn to such an extent that the beater does not operate prop- 1 erly. Therefore, one object of the invention is to provide a vacuum cleaner with a beater bar having operating means in which wear is reduced to a minimum and, therefore, not likely to .get out of order after being used a short time. 5

A more specific object of my invention is to rovide an electro-magnetically operated eater bar for the nozzles of vacuum cleaners.

Another object of my invention is to provide a beater wherein the bar is actuated by electro-magnets intermittently energized at a rapid rate of speed due to pulsations in alternating current and thereby eliminate the use of circuit making and breaking means.

Another object of theinvention is to provide improved means for firmly mounting the magnets and their armatures which carry the beater bar in end portions of the cleaner nozzle and at the same time allow removal thereof from the nozzle when cleaning or repairs are necessary.

7 Other objects and advantages of my in vention will become apparent to those skilled in theartas the following description is read in conjunction with the accompanying drawin s, wherein: igure 1 is a bottom plan view of a vacuum cleaner provided with an electromagnetically operated beater bar in accordance with my invention. I Figure 2 is a view in side elevation of the vacuum cleaner-shown in Figure 1 and being artly in the section taken on the line 22 of i ure -1.

igure 3 is a detail view of the electromagnetic device embodied in my invention and taken on the line3-3 of Figure 1.

Figure 4is a perspective view of one of the brackets mounted in the ends of the nozzle.

This improved beater is intended for use in connection with vacuum cleaners of a conventional construction and in Figures 1 and 2, there has been shown a vacuum cleaner, indicated in general by the numeral 1 and having the usual motor 2 and provided with a nozzle 3'which is open along its bottom for its full width. ,It is to be understood that the vacuum cleaner shown in Figures 1 and 2 merely represents one conventional type to which the improved beater may be applied.

A brush of the rotary typemay be mounted in the mouth or open lower end of the nozzle but in the illustration there has been shown a pair of brushes 4 and 5 joined in spaced relation to each other by springs 6 which urge the brushes apart and cause themto be retained in the nozzle by frictional engagement with the walls thereof, as shown in Figure 2. When a vacuum cleaner is merely provided with stationary or rotary brushes it will sweep a carpet or rug over which the cleaner is moved and remove lint and other surface dirt which is sucked into the cleaner along with other dirt sucked out of the carpet, but

it has been found that grit and other dirt which has become deeply embedded in the pile of the carpet or rug is not sucked out of the same unless the carpet or rug is agitated by a' beating action. Some vacuum cleaners which employ a rotary brush having beating bars or strips incorporated in the rotary brush but it hasbeen found that since these beaters move across the surface of the carpet when the brush is rotating they have a tendency to wear the pile whereas if a beater is provided which merely strikes the rug or carpet instead of moving across it with a rubbing action, this is eliminated entirely or at least reduced to a minimum.

In order to beat the carpet while the vacuum cleaner is moving over the same and, at the same time, allow a striking action to take place, I employ a beater bar 7 which extends longitudinally in the nozzle. If brushes of the type shown in Figures 1 and 2 are employed, the beater bar extends between these brushes but it is to be understood that it may be applied to cleaners having other specific types of brushes or to a cleaner not equipped with a brush. In order to support the bar and impart a vibrating motion thereto, when the sweeper is in use, I employ electro-magnets which are mounted in chambers 8 formed at the ends of the open mouth of the nozzle and extending rearwardly as clearly shown in Figures 1 and 2. Rollers 9 are rotatably connected with 'the outer side walls of the two chambers and extend slightly below the nozzle in order to allow the same to be moved easily across a rug or carpet. As previously stated, the electro-magnets are mounted in the chambers 8 and each is carried by a bracket constructed as shown in Figure 4. Referring to this figure, it will be seen that each of these brackets, which are indicated in general by the numeral 10, is of a U-shaped construction. These brackets are preferably formed from strong metal and each has its arms 11 formed with flanges 12 at its ends adapted to be secured againstedge faces of the front and rear walls of the chambers 8 by screws or equivalent fasteners 13 when the brackets are set into the chambers with their arms in close contacting engagement with the .front and rear walls thereof. The bridge of the brackets and the arms 11 are cut to form openings 14 and 15 and from opposed sides of these openings extend tongues 16 and 17, the tongues 16 projecting upwardly from the bridge and the tongues 17 extending inwardly from the arms. These tongues are integral with the brackets and are formed when cutting the openings.

Each bracket carries an electromagnet consisting of a U-shaped core 18 having its bridge portion extending upwardly through the slot 1-1 of its supporting bracket between the tongues 16 through which bolts or equivalent fasteners 1!) are passed, and its side arms fitting snugly between the tongues 17 through which similar fasteners 20 are passed. Therefore, the U-shaped core will be very firmly secured to its supporting bracket with its arms extending downwardl A center post 21 extends downwardly from the bridge portion of each core and about this ceutcr'post is disposed a coil 22. Leads .23 extend from the ends of the coil into junction boxes 24 secured against side walls of the chambers 8 for connection with power wires which also enter the junction boxes, and from an inspection of Figure 1, it will be seen that the power wires may extend upwardly along the vacuum cleaner and its handle in the usual manner for connection with a switch (not shown). When the switch is turned on, current passes through the coils and since it is intended to have alternating current used it will be readily seen that the pulsations of the cur- -the coils of the magnets.

rent will cause the magnets to be intermittently energized. The pulsations of the current are very rapid and alternately cause the magnets to be energized and then rendered inactive, at a high rate of speed. An armature bar 26 extends beneath the arms and center post of each magnet and at one end is secured to the free end portion of a leaf spring 27. This leaf spring is bent intermediate its length to provide a bowed bridge portion 28 to increase its resiliency and has one end portion secured to the armature bar, as previously stated, while its other end portion fits against the rear arm of the core where it is firmly secured by screws or other suitable fasteners. From an inspection of Figure 3, it will be seen that the springs 27 normally hold the armature bars spaced below the side arms and center posts of the magnets. Therefore, when current is passing through the coils to alternately energize and de-energize the magnets, the armature bars will be first drawn toward the magnets and then moved away from the same and the beater bar 7, which has its ends secured to posts 29 extending downwardly from the armature bars by screws 30, willbe vibrated at a rapid rate of speed and by contact with the carpet or rug over which the vacuum cleaner is moved, cause a beating action to take place and dislodge grit and other dirt which may have become deeply embedded in the pile of the carpet.

lVhen this improved vacuum cleaner is in use, the current is turned on in the usual manner and, if so desired, a separate switch may be employed for the wires leading to Therefore, the vacuum cleaner may be used with or without the beater operating. In some cases, a beater is not necessary, especially, if thin rugs or bare floors are being cleaned.

When, however, a thick carpet is being cleaned, current may be fed to the magnets and since it is alternating current, the beater bar will be rapidly vibrated as previously set forth, thereby setting up a. beating action which will very effectively dislodge grit and other dirt embedded in the carpet and allow the loose dirt to be swept off of the surface of the carpet and sucked out of the same. \Vhen it is necessary to make any repairs or replacements, the screws 13 can be removed, thereby releasing the brackets and allowing them to be drawn out of the chambers. The magnets and heater bar are moved outwardly with the brackets and, therefore, ready access may be had to the parts which need cleaning, repair or replacement.

What is claimed is:

1. In combination with a vacuum cleaner having a nozzle open along its bottom, brackets secured in end portions of said nozzle and each having arms and a bridge connecting the inner ends of its arms, electromagnets carried by said brackets and each consisting of a U-shaped core secured to the .bridge and arms of its supporting bracket springs, and a beater bar extending longitudinally in said nozzle and secured to said armatures and having vibrating movement through the open bottom of the nozzle when the magnets are intermittently energized by alternating current passed through them.

2. In combination with a vacuum cleaner having a nozzle open along its bottom, brackets secured in end portions of said nozzle and each having arms and a bridge connecting the inner ends of its arms, electromagnets carried by said brackets and each consisting of a U-shaped core having a center post encircled by a coil, the arms and bridge of each bracket being formed with openings and having tongues at opposite sides of the openings secured against opposed faces of the core 'to firmly secure the magnet to its supporting bracket, a spring strip secured to a side'arm of the core of each magnet and extending across the same toward the other arm of the core, armature bars secured to the springs of said magnets and extending across the arms and center posts thereof and normally spaced therefrom by the springs, and a beater bar extending longitudinally in said nozzle and secured to said armatures and having vibrating movement through the open bottom of the nozzle when the magnets are intermittently energized by alternating current assed therethrough.

having a nozzle open along its bottom and at the ends of its 0 en bottom formed with having a nozzle open along its bottom and.

at the ends of'its open bottom formed with chambers, U-shaped brackets in said chambers having their arms removably secured against front and'rear walls of the chambers, the arms and bridge portions of said brackets having openings therein and tongues at opposite sides of the openings, electro-magnets carried by said brackets and each consisting of a U-shaped core having a center post enn combination with a vacuum cleaner circled by a coil, said magnets being disposed between the arms of said brackets with their arms fitting between the tongues carried by the arms of'the brackets and their bridge portions extending through the openings 1n the bridges of the brackets and fitting between the tongues carried thereby, fasteners passed through said tongues to secure the same against opposed faces of the U-shaped cores of said magnets, a leaf spring secured against a side arm of each core and having its free end portion extending beneath the magnet toward its other arm, armature bars secured to the free end portions of said spring and extending beneath the arms and posts of the cores in normall spaced relation thereto, posts depending rom the free ends of said armatures, and a beater bar extending longitudinally in said nozzle and having its ends secured to said posts.

5. In combination with a vacuum cleaner having a nozzle open along its bottom, brackets removably secured in end portions of said nozzle, electro-magnets carriedby said bracket-s, armatures for said magnets, spring arms secured to the brackets and armatures and yieldably holding the armatures spaced from the magnets, and a beater bar extending longitudinally in said nozzle and secured at its ends to said armatures and bottom of the nozzle when the magnets are intermittently energized by alternating current passed therethrough.

In testimony whereof I afiix mly signature.

THEODQRE E. LER-C [L. 5.]

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3002217 *Nov 3, 1958Oct 3, 1961Nat Union Electric CorpVacuum cleaner nozzle
US7143470 *Jan 10, 2005Dec 5, 2006Mark D. BossesVacuum cleaner nozzle including mechanical beater and sonic beater
US7225505 *Jun 18, 2004Jun 5, 2007Bosses Mark DVacuum cleaner nozzle including mechanical beater sonic beater
US7234198 *Apr 20, 2005Jun 26, 2007Bosses Mark DVacuum cleaner nozzle including mechanical beater and sonic beater
US7836548Nov 2, 2007Nov 23, 2010Bukang Sems Co., Ltd.Vacuum cleaner
EP1879491A1 *May 10, 2006Jan 23, 2008Bukang Sems Co., Ltd.Sterilizer for bed clothes
WO2006009637A1 *Jun 10, 2005Jan 26, 2006Mark D BossesVacuum cleaner nozzle including mechanical beater and sonic beater
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/382, 15/364
International ClassificationA47L9/04
Cooperative ClassificationA47L9/0483
European ClassificationA47L9/04E4