Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1794070 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 24, 1931
Filing dateMay 1, 1929
Priority dateMay 1, 1929
Publication numberUS 1794070 A, US 1794070A, US-A-1794070, US1794070 A, US1794070A
InventorsFrink Carl H
Original AssigneeFrink Carl H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Snowplow
US 1794070 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 24, 1931. c FR|NK 1,794,070

SNOWPLOW Filed May 1, 1929 .3 Sheets-Sheet l W/rwsss BY A TTO NEY.

Feb. 24, 1931. FRINK 1,794,070

SNOWPLOW Filed May 1, 1929 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 C W/T/VEEE a BY I v H 3 l7 Y WV 7 ATT RNEY.

C. H. FRINK Feb. 24, 1931.

SNOWPLOW Filed May 1, 1929 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 I W W ATTOR EY.

M'TA/ESS Patented Feb. 24, 1931 CARI: H. FRINK, OF CLAYTON, NEW YORK sNowrLow Application filed May 1, 1929. Serial No. 359,547.

This invention relates to a snow leveling device adapted to be attached to the rear portion of a motor truck carrying at its front end a snow plow attachment of the class set forth in my Patent No. 1,589,748, J une 22, 1926, the main object being to widen the channel through the snow formed by the plow by levequipped with my invention in which the leveling wings are adjusted for use.

Figure 2 is an enlarged side elevation of the rear end of the truck and leveling wings mounted thereon showing also the means for raising and lowering the wings which are 1 indicated by dotted lines'in their elevated ineling oil the banks of snow thrown out by operative positions.

the plow blades as the machine proceeds along the road and thereby to reduce the liability of drifting of the snow into the channel formed by the plow.

In other words, I have sought to greatly increase the width of the highway available ..15 for traific during or following more or less severe snow storms in one continuous operation of the truck along the highway without producing excessive load upon the motive power.

One of the specific objects is to locate the plow in front of the truck with its apex in the longitudinal center thereof and to mount upon opposite sides of the same truck some distance to the rear of the plow a pair of leveling wings which may be raised and lowered as may be necessary or desirable according to the depth of the snow operated upon.

Another object is to permit the leveling wings to be elevated and folded close to opposite sides of the truck when not in use.

i A further object is to provide means whereby the blades may automatically adjust themselves to obstructions along the highway with- R out serious detriment to the machine or 0b 3 structions such as manhole plates, curbs and the like commonly used in citiesand analogous districts.

Another object is to support the leveling blades in such manner that they may be folded and unfolded toward and from the adjacent sides of the truck.

Another object is to provide means whereby the blades may be adjusted vertically to different heights and to different angles rela- 4 tively to a horizontal plane.

Other objects and'uses relating to specific parts of the machine will be brought out in the following description.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a top plan of a motor truck Figure 3 is an enlarged detail vertical sectional view taken in the plane of line 33, Figure 2.

Figures 4 and 5 are enlarged detail vertical sectional views taken respectively in the planes of lines 4-4 and 5-5, Figure 1.

In order that my invention may be clearly understood I have shown a portion of a motor vehicle comprising opposite lengthwise side bars or sills l of the chassis or frame upon which is mounted a vmotor 2, a cab 3,

and a box or body 4,the parts 2, 3 and 4.- being arranged in sequence from front to rear of the Vehicle.

. A snowplow 5 similar to that set forth in my patentpreviously referred to is detachably mounted on the front end of the chassis of the vehicle-to project forwardly ,therefrom and is provided at its front endwith a substantially straight horizontal plow blade '6 and rearwardly diverging deflecting blades 7 arranged with their apex in the longitudinal center of thei'vehicle and their outer ends extended some distance beyond the sides of the vehicle, the plow blade 6 bein disposed at substantially right angles to the longitudinal center of the machine to extendequal distances therefrom.

The means for attaching the plow to the front end of the machine and also the means widening of the channel in the snow formed by the plow 5.

The wings 8 are similar in construction and 5 elongated lengthwise of the vehicle so as to extend across the outer ends of thewheels -A- and beyond opposite ends of the body 4 and each comprises an outer sheet metal plate 9 reinforce at intervals throughout its length by som what heavier straps 10 of bar steel or equivalent material to hold the sheet metal sections 9 against buckling and to resist the strains incidental to the impact of the sheet metal sections with the snow.

These sheet metal sections 9 and reinforcing straps 10 are preferably concavo-convex in cross section with their convex sides facing outwardly, the upper edge of the sheet metal section 9 being returned upwardly and rearwardly to form a reinforcing flange 11.

A scraper blade 12 of flat steel or equivalent metal is secured by bolts 13 to the lower forwardly projecting edge of the sheet metal section 9 and one of the reinforcing straps 10 to extend downwardly beyond the lower edge of the sheet metal section for engagement with the snow and ice closely adjacent the pavement.

The lower edges of the sheet metal section 9 are further reinforced by angle irons 14applied to the inner faces thereof between the section 9 and the lower ends of the reinforcing strap 10 which, together with the reinforcing member 14 are clamped firmly in'place by the same bolts 13 which: hold thescraper blades 12 in operative position. Each of the wings 8 is hingedly secured near its front end to'a yoke 15 by means of a pivotal bolt 16, Figure 3, said yoke being arranged in a vertical position and has its lower and upper ends provided with apertured fllanges 17 in vertically spaced relation above and below the pivotal bolt 16 for receiving an upright pivotal rod or bar 18 which extends some distance above and below the upper and lower ehds of the yoke 15 and has its lower and up- Wper ends mounted in apertured flanges 19 on an upright post 20.

This post is preferably made in the form of an angle iron and is secured by a U-bolt 21 to the outer face of the adjacent sill 1 of the chassis, Figures 2 and 3.

That is, the upright posts 20 are rigidly secured to the chassis sills 1 and are each provided with the outwardly projecting flanges 19 which are arranged in vertically spaced relation to receive and support the lower and upper ends of the yoke-supporting rod or bar 18, each yoke 15 being slidable vertically along its supporting rod or bar 18 between the flanges 19.

These flanges are preferably made in the form of angle irons which are riveted or otherwise secured to the outer faces of the posts 20 as shown more clearly in Figure 3.

Each of the posts 20 extends some distance above and below its supporting sill 1 while the flanges 19 thereon are spaced apart vertically a considerably greater distance than the length of the adjacent yoke 15 to allow said yoke with the wing 8 thereon to be adjusted vertically for varying the distance of the lower edge of the scraper. blade 12 from the pavement and thereby effecting a corresponding variation in the level of the snow removed by the wings.

It is now clear that each wing has three distinct movements, first; a vertical rocking movement about the axis of the pivotal bolt 16 to vary the vertical angle ofthe wing, second; a vertical bodily movement along the upright guide rod 18 to vary the distance of the scraper blade 12 from the surface of the pavement-and thereby to vary the level of the snow operated upon by the wing and;

' third, a horizontal swinging movement about the axisof the guide rod 18 for varying the horizohtal angle of the wing relatively to the longitudinal center of the chassis and thereby to vary the lateral deflection of the snow and resultant widening of the available surface of the roadway for traflic purposes.

These several movements may also be utilized for folding and unfolding the wings toward and from the adjacent sides of the chassis and for the elevation of thewings some distance from the pavement when not in use.

Each of the wings 8 is provided near its rear endwith a reinforcing bar 22 which is similar to but somewhat longer vertically than the reinforcing bar 10 due to the increased vertical height of the rear end of the wing, said reinforcing bar being made of steel or equivalent material and bolted or otherwise secured to the rear face of the adjacent portion of the sheet metal section 9, as shown in Figure 4.

Each of the bars 22 is provided with a pair of inwardly projecting flanges 23 consisting of angle irons bolted or otherwise secured thereto and arranged in vertically spaced relation for receiving and supporting an upright post 24 having its lower and upper ends reduced at 25 and engaged in corresponding apertures in the flanges 23, the reduced por-' tions or pintles 25 being free to turn in said apertures to compensate for varying adjustments of the wing.

The rear ends of the wings-8 are braced in their operative positions against undue inward movement by a pair of thrust bars 26, one for each wing, each bar having its outer end pivoted at 27 to the post 24 near the lower end thereof or just-above the lower flange 23 and its front end flexibly connected by a clevice 28 or equivalent attaching member to an angle iron 29 which is bolted or otherwise secured to the outer face of the adjacent sill 1 near the rear end thereof as shown in Figures 1 and 4. I

The clevice 28 is not only pivotally connected to the angle iron 29 but is also pivotally connected to a plate 30 on the inner end of the thrust bar 26, said plate 30 being pro justed inwardly and outwardly to different angles about the axis of'its supporting rod 18. The intermediate portion of each thrust bar is connected by toggle links 32 and 32 to the post 24 near the upper end thereof or just below the upper flange 23, the link 32' being relatively short as compared with the length of its companion link 32 for a purpose presently described.

The link 32 is pivoted at 33 to a plate 34 on the thrust bar 26 some distance from the inner and outer ends of the thrust bar and is also pivotally connected'at 35 to the adjacent end of the link 32 to form a toggle joint, the upper end of the link 32 beirig pivoted at 36 to the post 24.

It will be observed upon reference to Figure 4 that each wing extends some distance above and below the horizontal plane of the pivotal connection 27 between the thrust bar 26 and post 24 thereby establishing a fulcrum about which the wing is free to move particularly in case the lower edge of the scraper blade 12 of the wing should encounter a manhole plate, a curb or other obstruction in the path of movement of the lower edge of the wing when adjusted for use. That is, when the machine is in bperation if the lower edge of the wing should engage a rigid obstruction it would be tilted inwardly and upwardly about the axis of the pivot 27 thereby causing a corresponding upward and outward movement of the entire wing.

This upward and outward movement is permitted by the flexible connection 28' of the thrust bar 26 with the chassis of the vehicle and also by the flexing connection between the toggle links 32 and 32 in which case the thrust bar 26 will be moved upwardly and slightly outwardly while the links 32 will return to their-normal positions by their i own weight and by the impact of'tlie snow against the wing until limited by the engage ment of the shorter link 32 with the upper face of the thrust bar 26,-as shown by full lines in Figure 4.

Raising and lowering mechanism Separate mechanisms are provided for adjusting the wings vertically independently of each other and also for 'efi'ecting an independent adjustment of the front and rear ends of each wing as may be required to vary the level of the snow operated upon and also for folding and unfol ing the wings.

The means for raising and lowering the front end of each wing preferabl consists of a chain 36 having its lower en attached to an eye 37 on the upper edge of the wing near the front end thereof and its upper end passed through a keyhole slot 38 in the upper end of the adjacent post 20, Figure 3, whereby the adjustment of different links in the opening 38 will effect a corresponding raising or lowering of the front end of the wing and will alsohold the end of the wing in its adjusted position against downward, movement while permitting its free upward movement.

The means forraising and lowering the rear end of each wing and also for effecting a bodily vertical movement thereof prefer ably consists of a conventional construction of chain or cable hoist having a lower and upper sheaves 39 and 40 attached respec-' tively to the upper edge of the wing 8 and to a suitable .crane 41 and connected in the usual manner by a chain or cable 42 which is passed around the sheaves 39 and 40 and has one end attached to the frame of the approximately midway between the ends thereof and as nearly as possible midwa/y between the opposite ends of their respective wings. I

These posts extend some distance above the box 4 while the cranes 41 are pivotally atguide bars 18 and also vertical angular move-- ments about their respective pivots 16 from the positions shown in full lines to the positions shown by dotted lines in Figure 2.

The upfper ends of the posts 46 are braced against orward and rearward vibration diagonal brace bars 48,Figure '2, and also braced against relative lateral vibration by additional diagonal brace bars 49, Figure5.

The lower ends of the wing-supporting. posts 20 are connected by a cross bar 50 having'its ends secured by bolts 51 or equivalent fastening means to the posts, as shown more clearly in Figure 3.

inc

In Figure 2 the box 4 is shown as supvported upon a plurality of cross bars 52 which, in turn, are supported upon lengthwise bars 53 resting upon the upper edges of the sills 1 and secured thereto by any suitable fastening means, not shown.

Operation the opposite sides of the chassis of the vehicle and remove and deflect the snow laterally from the pavement beyond opposite sides of the Vehicle thereby forming a channel through the snow of substantially the transverse width of the plow so that the snow at opposite sides ofthe channel will be accumulated in ridges or banks. Then, as the vehicle continues its forward movement the wings 8 shall extend some distance beyond the paths of travel of the outer edges of the plow blades 7 and remove and deflect outwardly the ridges or banks formed by the plow thereby greatly increasing the available width of the highway for traflic purposes and at the same time leveling off the snow in the path of the wings.

These successive operations of the plow 5 and wings 8 upon the snow not only conserve the power required for clearing the highway ficiently heavy to resist the power of the motor to propel the machine forwardly the rear ends of the wings may be elevated 01" rocked upwardly by their respective hoisting devices 42 about the axes of their corresponding pivots 16 for the purpose of reducing such resistance or, if desired, the wings may be elevated bodily along their, respective guide rods 18 by the same hoisting devices and by the adjusting chains 36 to bring the lower edges of the wings varying distance above the surface of the pavement parallel therewith or at an anglethereto according to the amount of adjustment of the hoisting devices 42 and 36.

Furthermore when the use of the wings 8 is not required they may be drawn upwardly and inwardly along the guide rods 18 and about the axes oftheir pivots 16 until folded close to the adjacent sides of the body 4 or to the position shown by dotted lines in Figure 2, it being understood that during this upward and inward folding movement the thrust bars 26 and links 32 will also be rocked upwardly on their respective clevices 28 to assist in drawing the rear ends of the wings, inwardly as the latter are elevated and also to partially support the wings in their elevated inwardly folded positions.

When the wings are folded to their inoperative positions as just described the supporting cables 36- for the front ends of the wings may be drawn through their respective openings 38 to assist in holding said wings in their elevated positions.

lVhen the wings are adjusted to their operative position for removing or leveling the snow along the highway any obstacle which may be encountered by the lower edges of the wings would cause said wings to automati cally rock upwardly and rearwardlythereby effecting a corresponding movement of the toggle links 32 and 32 in a manner previously described, but under normal conditions the shorterlinks 32' will rest upon the upper edges oftheir respective thrust bars 26 so that the links 32 may serve as braces between the thrust bars and posts 24 to firmly hold the wings in their operative positions except when encountering obstacles in the roadway as previously explained. 1

I claim:

1. In combination, a motor vehicle, a snow plow mounted on the front end of thevehicle,

leveling wings having their front ends hingedly connected to opposite sides of the vehicle some distance to the rear of the plow for vertical and laterial swinging movements, opposite side posts secured to and extended upwardly from the vehicle between the front and rear ends of the leveling wings, cranes hingedly mounted on the posts to swing about vertical axes, and adjustable connections between the cranes and wings for swinging the latter vertically.

2. In combination, a motor vehicle, a snow plow mounted on the front end of the vehicle, leveling wings having their front ends hingedly connected to opposite sides of the vehicle some distance to the rear of the plow for vertical andlateral swinging movements, thrustbars between the lower. portions of the wings and adjacent sides of the frame, and flexing connections between the thrust-bars and upper portions of the wings.

3. In combination, a motof vehicle, a snow plow mounted on the front end of the vehicle, leveling wings having their front ends hingedly connected to opposite sides of the vehicle some distance to the rear of the plow for vertical and lateral swinging movements, adjustable means for raising and lowering t e front ends of the wings, upright posts pivotally mounted on the wings to rock about vertical axes, thrust-bars having their inner ends operatively connected to thevehicle and their outer ends pivotally connected to the lower portions of said posts, and flexing connections between the upper portions of the posts and adjacent thrust-bars.

4. In combination, a motor vehicle having a chassis frame, a snowplow mounted on the 'front end of the frame, a thrust-bar hingedly connected at its inner end'to one side of the frame to extend outwardly therefrom, a snowleveling wing having its front end hingedly connected to said frame to swing vertically and laterally and its rear portion pivotally connected to the outer end of the thrust-bar to tilt forwardly and rearwardly, a link pivoted to the thrust-bar and normally extended inwardly from its pivot against the upper face of the thust-bar, and a brace-link having one end pivotally connected to the inner end of the first named link and its other end pivotally connected to the wing in a plane some distance above the pivotal connection of the thrust-bar with. the wing.

5. A snow leveling device as in claim 4 in which the chassis is provided with an upright post, a crane hinged to the post to swing about a vertical axis, and cable and-sheave connections between the crane and wing for raising and lowering said wing.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my H hand this 11 day of April, 1929.

CARL H. FRINK.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4731942 *Jan 7, 1987Mar 22, 1988Eberle Ronald DDozer blade
Classifications
U.S. Classification37/232, 37/277, 37/274, 37/235
International ClassificationE01H5/06, E01H5/04
Cooperative ClassificationE01H5/067
European ClassificationE01H5/06E