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Publication numberUS1794557 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 3, 1931
Filing dateJan 12, 1929
Priority dateJan 12, 1929
Publication numberUS 1794557 A, US 1794557A, US-A-1794557, US1794557 A, US1794557A
InventorsSymonds Cleon W
Original AssigneeSymonds Cleon W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Quartz rod for use with ultra-violet lamps
US 1794557 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 3, 1931. c, w SYMQNDS 1,794,557

QUARTZ ROD FOR USE WITH ULTRA VIOLET LAMPS Filed Jan. 12, 1929- Patented Mar. 3, 1931 PATENT OFFICE CLEON W. SYMONDS, OF PASADENA, CALIFORNIA QUARTZ ROD FOR USE WITH ULTRA-VIOLET LAMPS Application filed January 12, 1929.

This invention relates to quartz-rods for use in ultra-violet lamps and the object of the invention is to provide a quartz rod which will distribute the rays emanating therefrom evenly to all parts of the cavity to which it is applied.

Another object of the invention is to provide a quartz rod for use with an ultra-violet lamp in which the construction of the end thereof is formed to distribute rays laterally.

Another object of the invention is to provide a quartz rod for use with an ultra-violet lamp in which the lateral portions thereof are formed to distribute rays evenly through the sides.

I accomplish the above and other objects of the invention by means of the construction illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which Figure 1 is a sectional elevation of the end of the quartz rod according to my invention;

Figure 2 is a perspective of the end of the rod shown inFigure 1;

Figure 3 is a sectional elevation of a modified form of quartz rod;

Figures 4 to 11 are sectional elevations of other modifications of my invention;

Figure 12 is an elevation, partly in section of a modified form of my invention showing the lateral portions of the rod formed with concave lenses;

Figure 13 is an elevation, partly in section of a further modification showing the sides of the rod formed with convex lenses; and

Figures 14 and 15 are elevations, partly broken away of further modifications of the main portion of the rod; and

Figure 16 is sectional elevation of a further modification of my invention.

On the drawings, in which like reference characters indicate like parts on all the fig ures thereof, 1 indicates a quartzrbd embodying my invention having an enlarged end portion 2 formed with an inverted cone Serial No. 332,172.

shaped depression 3 therein. In Figure 3 is illustrated a modified form of my invention in which the periphery of the enlarged end portion is formed with a concave surface 4, while in the modification. shown in Figure 4 the periphery of the enlarged portion is formed with a convex lenticular surface 5.

In the modification shown in Figure 5, the central portion 6 of the depression is of concave formation. In Fi ure 6, the central portion of the cone shape depression has a plane surface 7. In Figure 7, the central portion of the depression has a convex len-' ticular formation 8, while in Figure 8 the central portion of the depression has a central surface 9.

In all of the foregoing figures, the end portion of the rod is enlarged, while in Figures 9, 10 and 11, the end portion is of the same diameter as the main body portion of the rod. Figure 9 is similar in formation to Figure 1; Figure 10 is similar to Figure 3; and Figure 11 is similar toFigure 4, the end portion of the rod, however, being of the same diameter as the main body portion.

In Figures 12 and 13, the peripheries of the main body portion of the rod are shown as provided with concave and convex lenses 10, 11 respectively, so that cavities having long passages will be successfully treated by the use of theseconstructions.

I at the end of the rod includes an inverted cone 12 which is the reverse'of the formation shown in Figure 8.

In Figure 16, the rod is shown as being of hollow formation and enclosing a plurality of quartz balls 13 in the end thereof to refract the rays in various directions. It is apparent that this construction, in which the rod is hollow through a portion or all of its length,

might be made in the form shown in either of Figures 14 or 15, and might be provided with lens formations in the sides thereof, or have an end formation of the type shown in any one of Figures 1 to 11 inclusive.

In quartz rods, such as have been previously employed for use with ultra-violet lam s, the rays were transmitted along the re and emerged at the end, no provision being made for treating anything more than a substantially fiat or slightly curved surface against which the end of the rod could be disposed.

By the use of m invention, which provides for distributing t e rays laterally of the rod,

it is possible to treat successfully many cavities and passages in the body which are of peculiar formation and which cannot be reached CLEON WV. SYMONDS.

by the construction of quartz rod ordinarily employed.

If desired, the portion of the rod through which the rays will emerge may be polished so as to permit all of the rays emerging without loss by reflection, while the portions of the rod through which it is desired that the rays shall not pass may be left unpolished so that any rays which may strike such unpol-.

ished surface will be reflected back and properly transmitted through the rod, emerging at the specially formed end thereof.

It is' obvious that in some of the constructions shown the rays will be dispersed as in the cases where the rod has concave formation, whereas in other constructions the ra s y 2. A quartz rod having a depression in the end thereof, the depression being substantially cone shaped, the sides of the rod adj acent the end having a lens formation.

3. A quartz rod having an end portion of larger diameter than the main body portion thereof, said end portionhaving a substantially cone shaped depression therein.

4. A quartz rod having a depression in the end thereof, the depression being substantially cone shaped, the apex of the cone being modified to form a lens.

5. A quartz rod having a depression in the 4 izo

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3439157 *Feb 11, 1966Apr 15, 1969Singer General PrecisionPoint light source
US3617132 *Aug 5, 1969Nov 2, 1971Beltronix System IncApparatus utilizing light-conducting rods with lenses for providing a remote indication of the amount of magnetic recording tape on a reel
US4062996 *Jun 18, 1973Dec 13, 1977The United States Of America As Represented By The Administrator Of The National Aeronautics And Space AdministrationSilica
US5000752 *Jun 19, 1989Mar 19, 1991William J. HoskinTreatment apparatus and method
US5380318 *Mar 11, 1994Jan 10, 1995Surgical Laser Technologies, Inc.Contact or insertion laser probe having wide angle radiation
US5718666 *Feb 29, 1996Feb 17, 1998Bioenterics CorporationTransilluminating bougie
US5968039 *Oct 3, 1991Oct 19, 1999Essential Dental Systems, Inc.Laser device for performing canal surgery in narrow channels
US6848822May 31, 2002Feb 1, 20053M Innovative Properties CompanyLight guide within recessed housing
WO1998048690A1 *Apr 28, 1997Nov 5, 1998Bioenterics CorpTransilluminating bougie
Classifications
U.S. Classification607/93, 359/355
International ClassificationA61B18/20, A61N5/06, A61B18/22
Cooperative ClassificationA61N5/0603, A61B2018/2261
European ClassificationA61N5/06B4