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Publication numberUS1794652 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 3, 1931
Filing dateMay 25, 1929
Priority dateMay 25, 1929
Publication numberUS 1794652 A, US 1794652A, US-A-1794652, US1794652 A, US1794652A
InventorsStone Frederick
Original AssigneeDoheny Stone Drill Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hydraulic trip spear
US 1794652 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 3, 1931. F. STONE, 1,794,652

HYDRAULIC TRIP SPEAR Filed May 25, 1929 2 Sheets-sheet 1 Patented Mar. 3, 1931 FREDERICK sronn, on tos iiventns; eatironmmsssrenon 'r'o nonnnYsroNn DRILL 00., or. Los Ernestine; canines- A, A CORBQBATIONOF DE AW R Ernestine-r313 srnsit Application filed 'May 25',

V This invention has to do generally-with tools for recovering fishes iii-011 0111 wells and thelike, and is "more particularly concerned with the speartype o'tiishingtool.

l 5 '-Ayspearfisj in-thenature of a tool adapted to be I entered -..flnrugli t ore Of tubular work, hav ng aws (or gr pping members which ZlzlBlIliblIllitlHGdllfk-fl radially'retracted or inoperative positionias the tool is lowered 1G to working position and are then adapted to be radially expanded yer-projected into tight gripping engagement with-the bore-defining wall 0f thework.

These spears are used to pulltight casing strings or lostiends of easing; strings which have parted in a well; It is essential, that such tools have characteristics ot-great sturdiness' and SlHIPllCllJY; both as'regar'ds Peonstruction and operation; Theymust be 20 strong enough to resist extremely severe pull in-g'strains, which are often aggravated by the action of upwardly acting jars,- and yet must be of minimum bulk in order that they may be adaptable to various working' conditions. e

; lft may be considered as a generalobject of my invention to provide a fishing tool which has all thenecessarycharacteristics of adaptability, sturdiness, compactness and general efiiciency. v V

It being realized that-the awsor-gripping members are necessarilymovable, it will be seen that their mounting must be such that in spite of their capacity for such movement they are capable ofwithstandingqthc Severe service strains spokenvof above. The jaws of my tool are of such a character and'are so mounted that they are especially well adapted to resist such strains and yet their bulk isnot such as to render them unwieldy or to necessitate complicated, heavy actuating mechanisms. I V I The jaw; actuating mechanism is of a nature enabling the driller to project or retract the jaws irrespective of the depthat-which the tool is working. Itnot only has allthe strength necessary to meet the conditions mentioned above, but also issuch thatit may beoperated 'surely; quickly and easily.

Another feature whichfis inherent in my iazsi-seriar na. 365,909; r I

improved spearfisqthe protection afforded aga inst I the jaws accidentally hanging up; while the'tool is-being lowered intothe hole accidental-setting; is prevented may be discussed v to better advai-i tage inthe" detailed specifications toiifollow; 1

Thearrangement of parts is such that-there may be, provided; a circulation passage through the entire tool so,;as:the tool is being lowered xto-its field. of operation, circulating fhiicl nay bepassedtherethrough and thus utilizedto flush the-hole, clearing sand and debris trom thepath'ofthe tool. V

After-a fish has been grappled byza' spear it often happeristhatthe first pullingo 3,61- ations i'ail to dislodge the fish. Rather t an overstrain-the fishing string, with the chance of partlng 1t under-a'continuedpull, itis desirable that the. spear be entirelydetached from the fish and withdrawn from the hole. This withdrawal makes possible the: circulation'of oil around the fish to loosen up the l encircling sand, whereupon the grappling operation isrepeated: lhavetherefore provid'ed means wherebythe spear may be disengaged from the hsh when occaslon demands such an operation; the weight of thelishing stem being utilized to "force the" spear body downwardly in amanner. to causethe jaws to l'eccde from operative position. If this operation fails to retract the jaws, the tool lSlOtflliGClllIl a direction whieh'causes the e thread-like vgripping faces of the jaws to cut threads upwardly through the work wall and thus, inxetlect; unscrew the spear from the work. 1 The gripping jaw threads are lefthanded, that is, if the threads which connect the lengths of drill-pipe are right handed, so this thread cutting operation may be carried on without looseningthethreaded joints of the vfishing stem. V

Other objects and novel features of the invention will -be made apparent in thefollow- 'lllg.\ (l6li&lll description, reference being had to theiaccompanying drawings, in which:

Figug-lshQwsconventionally a bore hole and a-tubular fish therein, a tool embodying my lUU .12 opens.

Fig. 3 is a View generally similar to Fig. .2

but shows the gripping jaws in radially projected or operative positions, a portion of the tool being shown in elevation.

Fig. 4 is a section on line l--l of F ig. Fig. 5 is a section on line 5 5 of Fig. 3. Fig. 6 is a section on line 66 of Fig. 2; and Fig. 7 is a detached medial section through the lower part of the spear body.

I have shown at 10an elongated, tubular body having a relatively small bore 11,open-' ing to the lower end thereof, a larger counterbore 12 into which bore 11 opens, and a still larger counter bore 13 into which counter bore The upper end of the wall of bore 13 (Fig.1) is'threaded or otherwise suitably prepared to take a tubular joint or coupling member 14 whereby threaded connection is made to thetubular fishing stem generally indicated at 15. Stem 15 is made up of a plurality of pipelengths 16 threadably coupled together by tubular tool joints 17 or the like. Stem 15 is supported from above in the usual manner through bail 18aof swivel 18, or the like, which carries a usual hose connection 19 for the transmission of fluid under pressure from apump (not shown) to the stem bore, whence the fluidpasses to the bore of the spear, as will hereinafter appear. I have shown conventionally at 20 a valve for controlling the fluid pressure, though it will be understood that this showing is made merel y for purposes of illustration since the valve is ordinarily found directly at the pressure side of the pump. 7 y v.

Near the lower end of the body member 10 is a plurality of augularly Hlllttll elongated recesses 2i which open. sidewise to the outer peripheral face of the body member and open at their lower ends 22 around the reduced diameter portion of the body, said portion being externally threaded as at 24. The inner or bottom walls 25 of the recesses incline downwardly and outwardly as clearly shown inliigure 7, and opening into the up per ends of said recesses are bores 26 whose axes A are'substantiallyparallel to walls 25. Preferably, though not necessarily, walls are arcuate viewed in plan (Figs. 4t and 5) while the upper end walls 27 (Fig. 7) of the recesses are preferably arcuate as viewed in elevation. In the embodiment shown there are six recesses 21 in the body member, said recesses being spaced apart equally as viewed in plan, and consequently a longitudinal medial section through twov opposite recesses 21 give the effect shown in Fig. 7 wherein the portion 28 of the body which is defined by the opposite walls 25 may be considered as an upwardly pointing or upwardly converging wedge member'through the center of which extends bore 11. Of course, it will be understood this showingand description of a certain number and particular placement of recesses is in no way to be considered as limitative on the invention but is referred to merely in order to bring out one aspect of a preferred embodiment thereof.

Mounted for sliding movement longitudinally through recesses or ways 21 are work gripping jaws or wedge slips 29, these jaws being complementary in transverse cross section to the recesses (see Fig. 5) their inner longitudinal faces 30 being substantially parallel to and engaging walls 25,'and their opposite, work-gripping faces 31 extending substantially-parallel 'to the major B of the body member. Faces 31 are preferably serrated to provideparallel, upwardly pointing teeth 29a to give superior gripping qualities, and, for purposes to be described, preferably said teeth are cut inthe form of threads, that is, they incline or extendat an angle of other than with respect to the i vertical. axis of the individual jaw or with respect to aXis'B. 'The ja'ws'a're shorter in vertical extent than are-recesses 21 to allow the jaws vertical or longitudinal'play, and it will be'seen that due to theangularity of walls 25 and faces 30 with respect toivertical axis B, relative vertical movement between the body and jaws, with said walls and faces in engagement, sets up relative horizontal or transverse movement between said body member and jaws, this transverse movement moving the from the inoperative or retracted positions of Fig. 2 to the radially projecterhoperative positions of Fig. 3, or vice versa, Considering the assembly as viewed in plan and considering the work gri 'iping means as a ring of gripj'iing elements. it will be seen that vertical reciyn-ocation of the jaws through the recesses may be considered as causing radial contraction or expansion of the work gripping ring.

While any suitable means may be employed for retaining the jaws in recesses 21 and guiding said jaws radially inward as they are being raised, I have DTOVlClQd a means which is particularly elfective and ad va'ntageous from the nianufacturing, assembling and operating standpomts. This means comprises'a plurality of guide pins 32, one

for each jaw, which pins extend through ways or, bores 33 in the awe, the upper ends ill) ' m sses downwardly facing shoulder 36 of said body portion to close'oif recess ends'22. Q

Ringi has: vertical bores 87 l which take the bent-ends 88- of pins 32, andtalso carries dowels: 211ml 6) whose upwardly .projectingaheads 40 fit into. the complelnen- I tary 'recesses 41= in thesbody member, which recessesiopen downwardly to shoulder36;

A retaining nut 42isthen threaded over body portion 23, serving/to :hold ring; 35 i'nplace against shoulder- 36; Since dowels '39zhold v the ring against rotation with respect to body iii) 10,.said ring serves to: hold guide pins 32 against movement with relation to the body,

either direction.-with respect to-the body member and that byreason ofxthe angularities: specified; said jaws radially; outward orxto projected position when they are movedjdownwardly with rel tion to the body member and ra'diallyinward orto retracted position when they are moved upwardly iwith respect to the body member.

VV-henthe. jaws are infully retracted or inoperative position (Fig. 2)- they project radially slightly beyond the peripheral face of body member 10 and into openings 43 in a propeller sleeve 44 which is: mounted for vertical reciprocation about the outer face of member 10. Sleeve 44"is internally threaded at 45 to take! the threaded :portion 46 of pilot 47 i which pilotl serves. the, dual purposeof guiding; the tool into the bore of work Wand of providing-a connector between the propeller sleeve and a, piston generally indicated at 48*,which piston is adapted to be reciprocated vertically through body bore lizrata point above the jaws.

Pilot 47 is tubular in character, its drical body portion 49. having opening, relatively large bore opens a-smaller, internally threaded bore 50a in pilot nosebl; Bore 50a. in tin-n, communis cateswith nose port 52 which opensto, the bottom ofrthe tool, Nose 51 isformed by tapering or angling the lowerend of the pilot as at 53to bring the; rounded'end 54 offset with respectto axis 13,; so said angled face and offsetnosecan enter the bore of offset work (Fig. 1) and center it in bore hole H. Openingi'from pilotbore 50=to theouter face of thetool is ameliefportbfi through whichfluid leakingiintoithespace between the pilot and-body may exhausted, the building, up. of fluid, pressure in this space thusbeing. prevented, I

Piston 48is1nade up of an upwardly opening, cup leather 56 clamped [between a ring 5?, shouldered. .at. 58 on tubular piston rod jcylin 59, and amut or head '60: which .is threaded at onsaid rod.. Head 60 is helddetachthreadediat 64a into-nose: bore 50a.

are caused to move is moved upwardly ab'outthe body an upwardly 50 into which ably against relativemovementwithrespect 5 to thevpiston rod by means of aset screw 62, and the upperaend of said'head has a flaringopening 63rwhich provides a guide for, centering valve stopper 641 (Fig. 3), when the latter is dropped't-o place for purposes to be described. I

Piston rod 59-; extends downwardly throughbores:13,12, 11, andv 59, having a V sliding: fit throughbore ll andist finally 7 The piston rodithus' connects piston 48 and pilot ton withirespectto body} 101causes like move-v inentgof the:p ilot and sleeve; 44, I r 7 An expansivecoilspring;65iencircles rod 59 within boa-(s13, and 12, one springt 'end engaging the underfaceof ring 57 andthe 49- so that vertical reciprocation of said, plsother end engaging the upwardly facing shoulder 66 formed at -.the junction of bores 11 and 12 Spring'65. exerts a constant tendency to n ove piston 48 to the upperlimit of its travel, this limit beingestablishedby con tact of the upwardly facing annularshoulder 67. (Figwil) of pilot 49-with the downwardly facing shoulder 68 formed by the lower-face. of retaining nut 42, which'nut,

as: noted above-1s screwed fast tomernber 10. vOpenings 43 insleeve 44 are'complemenr tary' in outline :to j aws 29, as will be: seen by Q refe ence to Figures 1 2 and 3, and since, i

as has been statedfthe' awsproject into said openings when in their fully. retracted position, it will be seen that when-the sleeve is forced downwardly by depressingv piston 48, the upper arcuate defining walls 69 of saidslotsactas depressing members against the upper ends of'thejaws'tomove them downwardly and hence, due to the, angularityof contacting faces specified above, ra-

dially outwardly through saidsleeve openlugs. Onthe other hand, when; the sleeve frorn'the position of'Figure 3 to that of Figure 2' by reason of upward movement of piston148, the lower defining walls 70 of the recessea act; againstthe lower ends of" the jaws to raise them, which upward'verti'cal movement is ac'con'rpanied by 'radial retractive inovcment of the jaws due to the formation and arrangementof parts specified above.

Sleeve 44 is of such length" and so positioned that it entirely covers the recesses 21, except for theparts occupied by the jaws, throughout vertical reciprocation of the sleeve, andsince thejaws-have sliding fit throughout with the recesses,- it' will be' seen that'said sleeve forms :a housingto prevent theentrance of;dbris-towthe recesses above or below the The relative: dimensional characteristics and the radial stroke of the jaws are prefer ably such that when said, jaws are fullyretracted their teeth 29a, are i either just flush with Or slightly 'below'the peripheral face of sleeve 44 and when' the jaws are fully projected said. teeth are radially well beyond said peripheral face. Since spring 65 is of a strength to hold the jaws normally retracted so that teeth 29a do not .project beyond the sleeve, the tool may be lowered through the hole H, casing (not shown) which may be disposed in said hole, or tubular work W, without danger of the jaws engaging'any of the bore defining walls, with obvious advantage, the sleeve thus serving both as a propeller and clearance maintainer for the aws. Description of the Operation of the tool follows. With the parts in the position of Figures 1 and 2, the tool is lowered through hole H, being guided into the bore of work W by pilot nose 51. During this lowering movement circulating fluid-may be pumped through stem 16, bore 13, the hollow piston rod and bores 50,52 to flush away debris from the path of the tool. Thepressure of this circulating fluid is controlled so th'atit will not overcome the effect of spring 65 to set the jaws.

lVhen the tool has been lowered the requisite distance intowork W,its descension is checked and piston 48 is moved downwardly under the imposition of increased hydraulic pressure. The pressure may be built upon head 60 so that the latter is depressed in spite of the fact that a limited amount of fluid is free to pass througlrthe piston rod bore and out the bottom of the tool. Preferably, however, the bore through the tool is stopped off so the entire fluid pressure is efiectively directed against piston 48. This is done by dropping a ball stopper 6% through the bore of stem 15, the ball dropping or, being forced by fluid pressure downwardly to a point where it is guided by conical wall 63 onto seat at that end of piston rod 59 which is pre sented at the bottom of said conical wall (see Fig. 3). Stopper 64: thus closes off the bore of the hollow piston rod and all the fluid pressure is directed in a, manner to cause depression of piston 48. Depression of the piston compresses spring 65, and, through rod 5.) and pilot 49 moves sleeve 4% downwardly in a manner to force the aws down and hence radially outward into the position of Figure 3, where the work gripping faces 31' are shown in gripping relation with work W that is, teeth 29a are sunk in said work.

With the'jaws thus movedto gripping position, stem 15 is lifted by usual hoisting tackle (not shown), tending to carry with it the work I. It will be'noted that the upward strain of stem 15 imparted to jaws 29 l hrough contact with the upper face of ring 35 with the lower faces of the jaws, and the mounting of said ring on the body and the manner in which it is backed up by nut 42 render the tool well adapted to transmit these terrific pulling strains'to the fish withoutdanger'of the toolparts or assemblyv thereof giving way." A I if the piston does not push the cutters to fully projected position, it will be seen that the upward pull exerted on body 10 tends to set up such relative'vertical movement between the jaws and body that the jaws are wedgedby portion 28'more tightly into engagement with the work.

If the fish fails to come free, or if for any other reason it is desired to release the tool from the fish, the piston is relieved from by draulic pressure andstem 15 is allowed to drop under gravity by proper control of the hoisting tackle. The weight of stem 15 then tends to force the body 10downwardly; the aws, due'to their engagement with the work,

and the sleeve at tending to remain stationary. The relative .movement between the body member and sleeve thus set up causes, through the action of inclined pins 32 with the inclined jaw ways 33, said jaws to move radially inward toward the contracted posi tion of Figure 2, spring 65 completing the retractive lllOVBlDQlli; as soon as the jaws have beenfrecd from the work and thereafter serv ing to hold the jaws inretracted position so they willnot accidentally reengage the work or any tubular member through which it may be drawn in being pulled to the top :of the hole. V

Occasionally the jaws gain such a hold on the Work that they cannot be readily freed therefrom by the operation justdeticribed. Other means are then employed for freeing the tool from' the fish. As noted above, the work gripping faces 31 of the aws are in the form of teeth 29a having thread characteris tics. Assuming that all thethreaded joints 14; and 17 in stem 15, are right-handed ones, teeth 29a are made in the form of left hand threads. Accordingly, if stem 15 be rotated right-handedly, there consequently being no tendency to loosen its threaded joints, the left hand threads 2% will cut corresponding threads in the work and, with proper control of the hoisting tackle and rotary table, the jawswill thus thread themselves and the entire tool out of the work bore. As soon as they have cut their way out, spring 65 becomes effective to lift the piston, piston rod, nose, sleeve and jaws to the positions of Figure 2, the jaws thus being moved to retracted positrons.

In connection with this rotation of body 10 for threading the tool out of the work, it will be noted that jaws have such fit in recesses 21 that they are held from movement circumferentially of the work and are well backed up by the body during the time there is a tendency to give them circumferential movement. This fact is well shown in Figure 5. It may be also noted by reference to Figures 2 and 3 that the jaws are fully backedv up from end to end by bottom Walls 25', irrespective-of the positionto Which'said jaws have been pr'oject'echthe' cross section of'body between jaws and the radial cross sectional extent of said jawsbeing such that the terrific react-ionstrains (if-radial compressionduring operation ofthe tool are. effectively cared for.

It will be understood the-drawings and descr-iption are to beconsidered-merely as illus-' t rative of and not restrictive-on the broader claims appendecbliereto, for various changes in design, structure andarrangementniay be made Without departing from the spirit" and scopeof'saidclaims i i L 1. In a trip spear,' an elongated body inein ber adapted to be lowered into'the bore of vertically extending, tubular work, a'slee've mounted about the body'- member for vertical reciprocation flier-cover, said sleeve having anop'ening through its Wall, a-Workjgrippingjafivdirectl'ycarried-by the/bodfymember and movable radially with respect-thereto and through said-opening into, and" out of workgripping position, and means fen-reciprocating said sleeve said jaw being; movable to and from Work gripping position by virtue ofsaidsl'eeve movement, V

23 trip spear; an elongated body nieni ten adapted to'be'. lowered into the-bore of vertically extendin tubular work-, a sleeve mounted about the boldy nemb'er for vertical reciprocation thereovelysaidisleevehaving v an opening through its wallia Work gripping 1 said opening into and out ofiv position, andjnieans" for reclp'roc jaw. directly carried by tli'ebody member and movable"- radially with respect. thereto and throughsaid opening from-an inop'erative po sition to a 'Worl grippiiigpositiomandmeans for'reciprocating.said sleeve, said'jaw being movable from one posit-ion to the otherby" virtue of" sleeve movement in one direction;

lnatr ip spew-,m elongatedbody-mernf her adaptedto be lbwered intotlie bo'ref'of vertically eXt-endin mounted 7 about the body member forvertical" 1 reciprocation tli'ei'eover, said sleevehaving a ng; tubula r Work," a sleeve open-inglthrough its wall; a Work-gripping" jaw di'i' ectly'carried by the-body membermidfl movable longitudinally Withflrespfectto thej' body, coacting means on-tliejavv andbody with respect'to therbod'y inovessaidj'aw' radially Wit-hrespect tothebody through mung s'aldf sleeve; Salome-113m movable longitudinally with respect to body by virtue of Said sleeve niovei'nent; e

la pted to be' lovvered intotlie bore 'offj vertically extending, Y tubular Woif J; a sleeve mounted about the bodymember for vertical reciprocation:'thereover; v saidf sleeve Having;

vhereby longitudinal movement of the jaw I ol' e p gx I an ieswall; alwork gripping and through said opening from an inoperat'ive' position to a Work grippiii'gposition', and

vertically extending tubular work, a. sleeve mounte d ab out the be dy member for ,veitical reciprocation tlieireover, said'sl eeve having an :7

opening through it's Wall, a' Work gripping.

and movable r'adialiy with respect-theretoand through said opening from an inopera=- and springau'eane tor moving the sleeve in" one direction" longitudinally, said being movable from one position to the otlioi by' 6. Intatrip sp'ea-i a n elongatedbody member adapted to'bei'lovvered into the boreoi" vertically extending tubular work; afsleeve mounted about thebody member for vertical reciprocation thereover, said sleeveliavingan V openiiigztlii'oiigli its wall, a Work; gripping: 13W dlr ectljv carried s'a df body member and movable rad1ally with respect thereto and" through said opening from; an inopera I;

tive position to j a work gripping position,

hydraulic" pressure "means for moving the sleeve 'in' one direction longitudinally, said Javv'being movable fron one position to the other by virtueof su'chflsleevemovement, and.

means for movingt'lie. sleeve longitudinally'in the oppos te direct on, said 1awf jawvidirectly "carried: by said bodyniemb'er being movableif'roni'sarid other to said. one .i

posit-ion by virtue of! such" opposite sleeve cess therein which opens to the outer face:

expose the? a'vv' to the 1 outsideof spear; said sleeve being adaptedtocover 'sa around the Jaw throughout sleeve"'recipio d recess.

cation.

body membe;-,;sei

'cess tl1ei'ei11 v liichf opens to the outer" face thereof av Jaw adaptedjto play vertically tlirough said recess and mombieb virtue'o'l In tiip' spear; a vei'tic alljli extending r said play intoaiidoi'xt of op'erativepositiong and a sleeve about said 'b'ody and reciproca' blle vertically tliereover, said sleeve li'aving' an openingtherethrouglrtot take andexpose the the awth'rougliout slee'we reciprocatiomiand being adapted to coverfsaidi recess around tically through the recess in one direction whenvsaid sleeve is moved vertically in one direction. 7 j

9. In a trip spear, a vertically extending body member, said body member having a recess therein which opens to the outer face thereof, a jaw adapted to play vertically through said recess and movable by virtue of said play into and out of operative position, and a. sleeve about said body and reciprocable vertically thereover, said sleeve having an opening therethrough to take and expose the jaw to the outside of the spear, said sleeve being adapted to cover said recess around the jaw throughout sleeve reciprocation, and said sleeve engaging said jaw to move it vertically through the recess in opposite directions whensaid' sleeve is moved vertically in'oppo site directions.

10. In a trip spear, a vertically extending body member, there being a vertically extending recess in said body member, which recess opens to the outer face of said body mem her, the bottom wall of said recess inclining outwardly and downwardly, a jaw having an inner and outer face and being mounted in. said recess for movement vertically :therethrough with its inner face in engagement with said bottom wall of the recess, the outer, work gripping face of the jaw extending pare allel to the body axis, and means movable over the outside of the body member for moving said jaw vertically in both directions. 7

11. In a trip spear, a vertically extending body member, there being a vertically extending recess in said body member, which recess opens to the outer face of said body member, the bottom wall of said recess'in clining outwardly and downwardly, a jaw having an inner and an outer face and being mounted in said recess for movement v-e r-,

tically therethrough with its inner face in engagement with said bottom wall ofthe recess, the outer, work gripping face of the jaw extending parallel to the body axis, means for maintaining said inner aw face in contact with said recess wall-during vertical reciprocation of the jaw and means movable over the outside of the :body member for moving said aw vertically n both directions.

fl 2, In a trip spear, a vertically extending body member, there being a vertically ext-ending recess in said body member, which recess opens to the outer face of said body member, the bottom wallof said recess inclining outwardly and downwardly, a jaw having anlinner and an outer face and'being mountee in said recess for movement vertieally therethrough with its inner face in engagement with said bottom wall of the reicess, there being a way through, said jaw'parallel to said recess bottom wall, a guide pin supported in said recess-by the body and extendin parallel to said bottom wall and V b l r V through said jaw Way, and means without said recess for moving said jaw vertically. V 13. In a trip spear, a vertically arranged tubular-body member, a work grippingjaw mounted on'the body for vertical movement with relation thereto, coacting means on the body and aw whereby relative vertical move- 7 piston and propeller whereby vertical movement of the piston in one direction moves the jaw vertically in one direction.

14. Ina trip spear, a vertically arranged tubular body member, a. work gripping jaw mounted on the body-for vertical movement with relation thereto, coactinglmeanson the body and aw whereby relative vertical move ment of said jaw and body moves the jaw radially with respect to the'body, a piston mounted for vertical reciprocation in the body bore, a vertically movable propeller mounted on the outside of the body and applied to the jaw for moving it vertically, and an operative connection between the piston and propeller whereby vertical movement of the piston in one direction moves the jaw vertically in one direction.

15. In a trip spear, a'vertically arranged tubular body member,;a work mounted on the body for vertical movement with relation thereto, coacting means on the body and jaw whereby relative vertical move ment of said jaw and body moves the jaw radially with respect to the body, a piston mounted for vertical reciprocation in the body bore, a vertically movable propeller sleeve carried about the body and applied to the jaw for moving it vertically, an operative ppi j connection between the piston and propeller Y whereby vertical movement of the piston in one direction moves the jaw vertically in one direction, and a spring acting between the body and piston to move the piston andjaw in the opposite direction. a

16.111 atrip spear, a vertically arranged tubular body member, a vork gripping jaw mounted on the body for vertical movement with relation thereto, coasting means on the body and aw whereby relative vertical movement of said jawand body moves the jaw radially with respect to the body, a piston mounted for vertical reciprocation in the bodybore, a vertically movable sleeve about the bodya-nd engaging the jaw in a manner whereby vertical movement of the sleeve in one direction moves the jaw vertically in one direction, a piston rod extending downwardly throughthebodybore to a point below the jaw, anda member connecting the lower end of the piston rod to the sleeve, whereby vertical movement of the piston inone direction movessaid sleeve in said one directi'om 17. In a? trip spear, a vertically arranged tubular body-member, a work grippingjawmounted on the body for vertical movement with relation thereto, coacting means on the body and jaw whereby relative vertical movement of said jaw and body 'moves the jaW.

' radially with respect tothe;body,a piston mounted for vertical reciprocation in the, body bore, a vertically 'movable sleeve about the body and engaging the jaw in a manner wherebyvertical reciprocation of the sleeve in one'direction' 'reciprocates the jaw ver ti'cally, a piston rod extending downwardly through the body bore to a point below the jaw, and ame'mber connecting the lower end wardly with respect to the body member into a work gri'pping'position, hydraulic pressure means for so moving the jaws, the work gripping faceson said jaws being'in the form of threads', and means limitingLInOVement of the jaws cireumfe'rentially of the body throughout such longitudinal movement.

made'u'p' of pipe lengths coupled by right hand threads, and a trip spearcoupled-to the string,sa id spear embodying an elongated body member adapted to-be lowered intothe bore of vertically exte'nding,-Itubular' work, a work gripping jaw mounted in the body member and movable froi'n an inoperative position longitudinally and radially outwardly with respect to the body 'nember intoa work gripping position, hydraulic p'ressuremeans for so moving-the jaw, the work gripping faces on said jaws being in the form of left hand threads, and 'means limiting movement of the jaw circumferentially of the body throughout such longitudinal movement.

20. Ina trip spear,a vertically extending body member, said body member having a recess therein which opens to the outer face thereof, a jaw adapted to play. vertically through said recess and movable by virtue of said play into andoutof operative position, and a sleeve about said body and reciprocable vertically thereover, said sleeve having an open ng therethroughto takeand I expose the jaw to the outs de ot the spear.

21. In a trip spear, a vertically extending body: member, said body member having a recess-therein which opens to'the outer face thereof, a jaw adapted to play vertically through said recess" andmovableby virtue. of said play into and out of operative posithe piston'and' propeller whereby vertical tion, and a sleeveabout -said sbody and re cip'r'oc'able vertically-there'over, "said sleeve having an opening'theretliroug h Co-take and and said sleeveengaging' said aw to move it vertically through the recess in one' 'direction When said sle'eve is moved vertically in one-directions i 22;Inj a trip spear, body -'member, said body member havin a r i V P recess-therein wh chopensto the outer face -thereof, jaw adapted to play 1 vertically through said recess and movable bygvirtu'e of said-play Into and out of operat ve' pOsl tion, and a'sle'eveabout 'said body' and re- "ciprocable vertically thereover', said sleeve having an opening the're'througli toftalre' and expose the jaw to the outside otthe s'pe'ar,

and-said sleeve engaging said jaw-to move it vertically through'the recessin opposite directions whensai'd sleeve is moved ver 'ti'cally in opposite directions;

23. In a trip s ear, a vertically; arranged tubular body member, a work-gripping jaw mounted on the body for verticalmove'ment with relation thereto, coaoti'ng means on the body and 'j aw whereby relative vertical movement of said and 'body rnoves the jaw radially with respect to the body, a tubular piston mounted for verticalreciprocat'ion in the body bore, a vertically movable propeller sleeve encircling andscarriedby the body expose the jaw to the "outside of tl.1e spear,,

a vertically extending I and. applied to thejaw -for moving-it vere tically, and an operativeconnection between movement of "the piston in ione direction moves'the jaw-vertlcally in'one directiom'ithe piston -borejcommunicating with the body bore and 'opening,'in effect to the" outside of the spear.* 5 V r p 24.. In a trip spearyagvertmally arranged tubular body member, a work-gripping jaw mountedon the body :io'r vertical movement body and jaw'wherebyrrelativevertical. movement of said jaw and body. moves the aw I radially with respect' to'the body, tubular piston mountedtor vertical reciprocation in r the body bore, a vertically movable propeller carried by thebody and applied to the jaw for n'ioving it vertically, and. anopera'tive connection betweenthe. piston and propeller whereby vertical movement of. the-.p istonlin one direction moves the jaw vertically in one direction, the piston bore communicating with thebody bore ata point above said jaw and opening,in effect, to the outside of the spear-at a point below said jaw. 7 I v 25 I-naitrip spear, a' vertically arranged tubularbody-member, a work-gripping jaw mounted on the body for bodily movement radially with respect thereto a tubular: piston. mounted for vertical reciprocation; with respect to the body membemsaid'fjaWF'being movable *radiallyz in one direction 1 Linden-the with relationthereto,coactingmeans on the a influence of-piston movement in one direction; the piston bore Communicating with the body bore at a point above said jaw and opening, in effect, to the outside of the spear at a point below said jaw, and a stopper seat 011 said piston about its bore to receive a stopper dropped through said body bore.

26. In a trip spear, a vertically arranged tubular body member, .a work gripping jaw mounted on the body for vertical movement with relation thereto, coacting means on the body and jaw whereby relative vertical move v ment of said jaw and body moves the jaw radially withrespect to the body, a piston mounted for vertical reciprocation in the body bore, a vertically movable propeller carried by the body and applied to the jaw for movingit vertically, and an operative connection between the piston and propeller whereby vertical movement of the piston in one direction moves the jaw vertically in one direction, there being a fluid passageway through said. spear from the body member bore to the outside of the spear at a point below said'jaw.

27. In a trip spear, a vertically arranged tubular body member, a work-gripping jaw mounted on the body for radial and vertical movement with respect thereto, a pilot mounted for movement vertically with respect to. the body member, hydraulic pressure means for moving the pilot, and an operative connection between the pilot and jaw whereby pilot movement in oppositedirections moves the jawwertically with respect to the body in opposite directions.

28. In a trip spear, a vertically arranged bod member. a workri 3 nin 'aw mounted r C D on the body Ifor verticalmovementwith re spect thereto, coacting means on;the body and jaw whereby relative reciprocatory vertical movement of said jaw and body moves the jawradially with respect to said body to and from'work-gripping position, a propeller sleeve about the body and applied to the jaw'and movable in one direction to move the-jaw to work-grippingposition, and a shoulder on said body member adapted to engage said aw to limit the last named movement.

29; In a trip spear, a vertically arranged body member, a work-gripping jaw mounted on the body for vertical movement with reday of May, 1929.

body member, there being a plurality of circumferentially spaced, vertically extending recesses in said body member, which recesses open to the outer faceand toward the lower face of the body, a plurality of jaws mounted, one each, in said recesses formovement therethrough, said jaws being enterable in said recesses through the downward openings of the recesses, and a single stationary keeper detachably'connected to said body to close oifall of said downward openings after the jaws have, been entered.

31. In a'trip spear, a vertically extending body member, a plurality of guide pins circumferentially spaced about the body member and inclining downwardly and outwardly with respect to the vertical axis thereof, said pins being individually positioned at one end by the body member, and a single detachable holding element applied to V the body member near the other ends of the pins and engaging said other ends of all the pins to hold them positioned.

32. In a trip spear, a vertically extending body member, a plurality of guide pins cirends of said pins,said annular member there- J by positioning said lower ends.

In witness that I claim the foregoing I have-hereunto subscribed my name this 1st FREDERICK STONE.

spect thereto, coacting means on the body and v jaw whereby relative vertical. movement or said jaw and body moves the jaw radially with respect to said body, a propeller sleeve about the body and applied to the jaw and movable in opposite directions to movethe' jaw vertically in opposite d1rect1ons,.and a pair of vertically spacedfstationary shoulders on said body member adapted to engage said jaw to limit movement thereof in said opposite directions. 1 7 g 30. In .a trip spear, .a vertically extending

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Classifications
U.S. Classification294/86.15, 294/86.25, 294/86.19, 166/212
International ClassificationE21B23/04, E21B31/20
Cooperative ClassificationE21B31/20, E21B23/04
European ClassificationE21B23/04, E21B31/20