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Publication numberUS1795562 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 10, 1931
Filing dateFeb 8, 1930
Priority dateFeb 8, 1930
Publication numberUS 1795562 A, US 1795562A, US-A-1795562, US1795562 A, US1795562A
InventorsKing William S, Otto Max C
Original AssigneeKing William S, Otto Max C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Playing die
US 1795562 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 10, 1931. w. 5. KING ET AL 1,795,562

PLAYING DIE Filed Feb. 8, 1930 if s Inventors By @Maorfiia A tiomcy Patented Mar. 10, 1931 vireo STATES PATENT oFFicE WILLIAM S. KING AND MAX 0. OTTO, OF ENID, OKLAHOMA PLAYING DIE Application filed February 8, 1930. Serial No. 427,003.

This invention relates to a new type of playing die which is expressly designed for use in a recreational game involving an experience of luck and chance, and designed for peculiar maneuvering by overturning in an indeterminable manner.

The playing piece is employed in a game which is known as flip-flop, and as the name implies, the playing piece is constructed in a manner to permit it to be flipped with the index finger and rocked and thrown bodily in the air and to land abruptly on one of the fiat faces thereof in a solid flop-like manner to display the points to be computed in conducting the game.

Generally stated, the novelty is predicated upon the construction and designing of the playing piece, which is characterized by unusual geometrical configurations, the same being distinguishable in that it embodies a four-sided plane surface body resembling a parallelogram whose general contour is that of an oblong. V

More specifically stated, we provide a playing piece whose major portion is spotted or otherwise marked to provide numeral indicia such as is utilized on one of the dies of playing dice, this having associated therewith longitudinally alined projections expressly formed to produce the desired finger depressing means for flipping and flopping the device, thereby producing an oddity possessing both ornamental and utilitarian appeal and permitting the playing of a recreational game wherein the participants provoke considerable amusement because of the unexpected and indeterminable maneuvering of the device,

In. the drawings:

Figure 1 represents a perspective view of a playing piece or die constructed in accordance with the present invention.

Figure 2 is a top plan view showing the normal obverse face.

Figure 3 is aside view showing a companion face.

Figure 4 is an end view showing the configuration of one of the end extensions.

in the drawings, it will be seen that we have represented an oblong block-like body. This may be solid or hollow and constructed of any appropriate material. In fact, it has been found that wood is sufficient to fill the requirements in an enjoyable manner.

The major portion of this block is distinguished by the reference numeral 5, and as before implied, this resembles somewhat a playing die which constitutes one of the members of complemental dice. In the present arrangement however, this portion 5 is cubical in configuration, and is provided with four distinguishable faces. For instance, the face 6 has a single spot, the face 7 two spots, the face 8, three spots, and the face 9, four spots. Instead of spots, numerals might suffice.

It has been found more feasible and practical to utilize indicia of a numerical character since the play of the game requires computation from a standpoint of addition to determine the winner. Formed integral with opposed sides or faces of the spotted cube 5 are longitudinally alined extensions 10 and 11 respectively. These are disposed on sides of the cubes not having indicia.

The extensions are of sufficient dimension to provide the desired congenuity of surfaces permitting the surfaces of the extensions to coincide with the complemental surfaces of the cubical portion 5. Moreover, tnc extensions are so shaped as to provide alternate terminal points or peaks distinguished by the reference characters 12 and 13 respectively. Each extension has a pair of right angularly disposed fiat sides and a pair of tapered and longitudinally curvate sides.

The curvate portions are of segmental configuration in general outline and the curvate portions on the extension 10 are reverse or alternate to the corresponding portions on the extension 11, as is shown in the drawing. Considering the distinguishable four faces of the extension 10 for example, it will be'seen that the curved face 6a provides a rocker for the face 6 in Figure 2. Likewise, the curved surface 9ais located to form a continuation or rocker for the surface 9 in Figure 1.

The surface 7a in Figure 3 is a continuation of the surface 7 and of course is flat, and in a plane'with the surface 7, being a continuation thereof. The same is true of the area or the surface distinguished by the numeral So, this being a continuation of the [lat surface 8 in Figure 1. Thus the extension 10 is made up of the four distinguishable surfaces (3a, 7a, 8a, and 9a respectix ely.

Referring to the extension ll, it will be seen in Figure 2, for example, that (S?) is the flat continuation for the surface 6. Thus, in the top plan view seen in Figure 2, it will be observed that the entire top side of the block embodies in this particular position, the distinguishable features (3, 6c, and 6?) in desired complemental relationship.

in Figure 2- 7i) designates a rocker for the surface '7. in Figure 1, 8b is the curvate rocker for the surface a, and 9b the flat continuation of the face or surface 9.

Briefly then, the major portion 5 comprises a. spotted cubi central portion having the four distinguishable faces 3, 7, 8 and 9, anyone of which may constitute temporarily, the obverse side of the block in play. T hen there are tne alternately arranged plano-convex and tapered extensions 10 and 11 respectively, with their individual t lll'i'dCQS constituting continuation of the respective faces, (5, 7, 8 and 9 respectively.

In playing the game, the rules require that the block in its normal position, must be in the position seen in Figure 2, that is, with the single spot up facing the player. When in this position, the first performer, who is supposed to have five continuous chances, employs the index linger in slipping the block over. At this time, the curvate surface 860 of the extension 11 constitutes a rocker. Therefore, the player puts the index finger on the point 13, forcing it downwardly in a quick manner and immediately removing the linger, permitting the entire block to flip up into the air and overturn bodily and to fall on an indeterminable one of the flat sides.

For instance, it may drop into the position shown in Figure 3. Thus this player would have scored three points. On the next play. he may score two, thus giving him a total of five, and he adds together each play until he has had five plays, and keeps his total accumulated in these five plays, whereupon the next participant repeats the order of playing and computes his score for five plays.

The rule of live plays for each player at a time however, is arbitrary, but it has been found feasible to give each player five contiuuous turns while operating and to allow each.player to have approximately five plays. Thus in all, he would flip the block twentyfive times and his total of spots would tell his particular score. The player having the greatest total is of course, the winner.

Assuming that the block might be on the floor in the position seen in Figure 3, it will be seen that the point 12 would be depressed, rocking the block down on the rocking surface in the direction of the arrow A or it may be in the position seen in Figure l, at which time the point 12 would be forced downwardly in the direction of the arrow B.

A careful consideration of the description in connection with the drawings will enable the reader to obtain a clear understanding of the construction, the operation of the improved playing piece. Therefore, a more lengthy description is regarded, as unneces- Minor changes in shape, size, and rearrangement of details coming within the field of invention claimed may be resorted to in actual practice if desired.

lVe claim:

1. In a computing die for use in playing a game of the class described, a body embodying a central cubical portion having distinguishing spots on the individual faces thereof, and a pair of longitudinally alined extensions projecting from opposed faces of said cubical portion, each extension embodying a series of four distinguishable plane and convex surfaces, the convex surfaces of one extension being arranged in an alternate manner with respect to the corresponding surfaces of the remaining extension.

2. In a computing die for use in playing a game of the class described, a body embodying a central cubical portion having distinguishing spots on the individual faces thereof, and a pair of longitudinally alined extensions projecting from opposed faces of said cubical portion, each extension embodying a series of four distinguishable plane and convex surfaces, the convex surfaces of one extension being arranged in an alternate manner with respect to the corresponding surfaces of the remaining extension, said convex surfaces functioning as rockers and the plane surfaces constituting continuations of the companion faces of said cubical portion.

3. As a new product of manufacture, a playing piece of the class describedcomprising acube having four flat surfaces each provided with distinguishable computing spots, a pair of longitudinally alined integral extensions formed on opposed faces of said cube each extension having four plane and convex surfaces and each including a pair of curvate rockers and a pair of right-angularly disposed fiat sides.

4:. As a new product of manufacture, a playing piece of the class described comprising a cube having four flat surfaces, each provided with distinguishable computing spots, a pair of longitudinally aligned integral extensions formed on opposed faces of said cubes, each extension having four plane and convex surfaces and each including a pair of curvate rockers, and a pair of right angularly disposed flat surfaces, which, with the companion die faces, form relatively extensive playing surfaces, capable of ordinary natures.

WILLIAM S. KING. MAX 0. OTTO.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3649017 *Mar 9, 1970Mar 14, 1972James W KirkpatrickSimulated baseball game
US4793619 *Apr 8, 1986Dec 27, 1988Anjar CompanyFlip out game and game piece
US5690331 *Aug 7, 1996Nov 25, 1997Tsr, Inc.Four-faced die
US5938197 *Jan 6, 1998Aug 17, 1999Bowling; Michael A.Random number generator for game playing
US6123332 *Jun 28, 1999Sep 26, 2000Bowling; Michael A.Random number generator for game playing; and methods
US6318720Sep 26, 2000Nov 20, 2001Michael A. BowlingRandom number generator for game playing; and methods
US20170312620 *Apr 27, 2016Nov 2, 2017Carl Rodson AllredSolid State Random Number Generator
EP0211186A1 *Jun 11, 1986Feb 25, 1987Becker, James R.Flipping game and game piece
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/146, 273/353
International ClassificationA63F9/04
Cooperative ClassificationA63F9/0415
European ClassificationA63F9/04D