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Publication numberUS1795599 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 10, 1931
Filing dateMay 30, 1930
Priority dateMay 30, 1930
Publication numberUS 1795599 A, US 1795599A, US-A-1795599, US1795599 A, US1795599A
InventorsHarry Grumbach
Original AssigneeSimon Ascher And Company Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Knitted helmet
US 1795599 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Much-1o, 1931.

H. GRUMBACH 1,795,599

KNITTED HELMET Filed May 30, 1930 BY Je ATTORNEYS Patented Mar. 10, 1931 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE HARRY GRUMBACH, 0F NEVJ YORK, N. Y., ASSIGNOB TO SIMON ASCHEB, AND COMPANY, INC., OF NEW YORK, N. Y., A. CORPORATION 0F NEW YORK` KN ITTED HELMET Application filed May 30,

This invention pertains generally to knitted garments and particularly to knitted garments adapted for use as headwear.

The invention will he described in connec tion with a knitted helmet. However it is understood that it may be app-lied in many other ways.

Knitted materials when used "for helmets, caps and the like have a tendency to become stretched out oshape and to lecco-inc baggy in places, particularly along the top from the front to the rear. 'lhe result is that the article becomes unsightly in appearance and is ill fitting.

According to this invention the rows oi stitching, thatI is, the courses are arranged so as to eliminate all undue stretching and bag ging of the material and to cause the helmet, cap or similar article to cleave closely to the head at all times. This result is accomplished by arranging the rows et stitches making up the top portion of the cap in an inverted V at hoth the front and the rear and increasing the angle of the V progressively towards the top centre, until the former inverted Vs are eventually merged in a substantially straight line. When constructed in this manner the tension exerted on the top portions by the side portions draws the top portion tightly down onto the head over its entire length from front to rear. The side portions may be Jformed in any known manner, so to gri p the head to remain in position or may be provided with flaps, which unite under the chin so as to 'form a helmet.

To add to the natural tendency of tlc article to form itselr" to the head, the top portions may be made arcuate in cross-section; the arc being in concave relationship with the top of the cap.

Referring to the drawings in .which like reference characters are appended to like parts throughout the various views:

Figure l is a perspective view of a helmet.

Figure 2 is a perspective view of the helmet illustrated in Figure 1 but from a dii`- ferent angle.

Figure 3 is a perspective view of the helmet illustrated in Figure 1, showing a side and the rear thereof.

1930. Serial No. 457,689.

Referring to the drawings, at l is shown a helmet,y comprising topportions 2 and 3 se cured together at 4a and side portions 4 and 5. Side portion 4 is secured to the top portion 3, as illiistrated at 6, and side portion 5 i? secured to top portion 2, as illustrated at Side portions 4 and 5 are shown provided with extensions 8 and 9, which overlap at 10 and may he secured with a snap 11. It is, of course, understood that any other form of side portion may be employed, but preferaly one that is adapted to exert at least a slight tension on the top portions, when the cap is in position on the head. The purpose of this tension will be set forth hereinafter.

The selvage at the front and rear openings may be finished in any desired manner, as illustrated at 12 and 13.

The top portions 2 and 3 have their rows of stitching, that is the courses, arranged at both the Jfront and rear so as to slope towards the top centre of the cap. This arrangement results in a plurality of inverted Vs formed by the rows ofstitcliing. The inverted Vs at the front Vof the cap are clearly seen at 14, in Figures 1 and 2,. In Figure 3 the Vs at 14 are shown in upright position. The inverted Vs'at the rear of the helmet are clean ly seen at 15 in Figure 3i. The arrangement is such that at some point intermediate the front andthe rear of the top portion and adjacent the top centre, the inverted Vs 14 and 15 merge 'together from opposite sides into a more or less straight line, as illustrated at 16.

The side portions 4 and 5 may have the rows-of stitching running in any desired direction. However, I find that by arranging the rows of stitching 19 of the sidev portions 4 and 5, so that they will he substantially horizontal when the helmet is in position on the head,that a substantially even tension is exerted upon the longitudinal edges of the top portions 2 and 3.

The top portions 2 and 3 are shown joined together by seam 4a. After the seam is made I may draw the portions 2 and 3 down around the seam by any means, such as stitching from underneath. Top portion 3 may be joined to side portion 4 and top portion 2 may be joined to side portion 5 in the same manner. The result is that the top portions 2 and 3 have an inwardly sloping arcuate cross-section, as illustrated at 17.

The knitting is not limited to any particular type ot stitch. But the type of knitting` illustrate-d in the drawing has wales shown :it 18 on the inside of the helmet running at right angles to courses on the outside.

Then the helmet illustrated is placed upon the hea d and the side portions 4 and 5 drawn downward, the tension on the rows of stitches 14 and 15 is such, as to draw the top seam 4a, as well as the top portions Q and 3 tightly down onto the head. The tension on the seam ta, and portions 2 and 3 is not only in adirection toward the 'front and rear of the head, but also from the sides to the center. Any tendency towards bunching is thus effectively overcome. Vhen the portions 2 and 3 are made arcuate, as above described, a lesser sidewise tension on these portions is required to cause them to fit snugly to the head.

While I have described the invention in connection with a helmet having two top portions and two side portions, it is obvious that the entire helmet may be made in one piece, if desired, or any number of pieces. It is also obvious that the top portions 2 and 3 may be made of one piece, having adjacent sections, the rows of each section defining an angle with the rows of the other section in the manner as above set forth.

lhile the invention has been described in connection with courses, it is understood that wales may be substituted therefor without departing from the spirit of the invention. The term rows of stitching as used in the claims is intended to mean courses and the term rows of knitting as used in the claims is intended to include rows made entirely from courses or rows made entirely from wales.

Having described my invention it is obvious that many modifications may be made in the same within the scope of the claims without departing from the spirit thereof.

I claim:

1. A knitted head-piece, comprising adjacent top members having angularly related rows ot knitting, said angularly related rows toi-ming an inverted v with respect to the selvage at both the front and rear of the head-piece, the angle between said rows increasing from both the front and rear towards the central top portion and merging into each other, and side members attached to said top members, said side members adapted to exert a tension on the longitudinal edges of said top members when the headpiece is on the head.

2. A knitted head-piece comprising a top portion having angularly related rows of stitching, said angularly related rows forming an inverted V with respect t-o the selvage at both the front and the rear of the head piece, the angle between said rows increasing from both the front and the rear towards the central top portion and merging into each other, and side members attached to said top portion, said side members adapted to exert a substantially even tension on the longitudinal edges olf said top portion when the headpiece is in place on the head.

3. A knitted head-piece comprising adjacent top members having singularly related rows of stitching, said angularly related rows forming an inverted V with respect to the selvage at both the front and the rear of the head-piece, the angle between said rows increasing i'rom both the iront and the rear towards the central top portion and merging into each other, and side members attached to said top members, said side members adapted to exert a tension on the longitudinal edges of said top members when the head-piece is in place, said top members adapted to normally assume a concave cross-section between their longitudinal scams.

in testimony whereof, I have signed my name to this specili 'ation this 24th day of Hay, 1930.

HARRY GRUMBACH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2983925 *Aug 12, 1960May 16, 1961Andre Fantasies IncCap-type head covering
US3205508 *Dec 2, 1963Sep 14, 1965Wilma W CoxSafety helmet liner and assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification66/171, D02/880
International ClassificationD04B1/22, D04B1/24
Cooperative ClassificationD04B1/24
European ClassificationD04B1/24