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Publication numberUS1797676 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 24, 1931
Filing dateJun 24, 1929
Priority dateJun 24, 1929
Publication numberUS 1797676 A, US 1797676A, US-A-1797676, US1797676 A, US1797676A
InventorsBaker Milton L
Original AssigneeStandard Oil Co California
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Extension-spout oil can
US 1797676 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 24, 1'931. M. BAKER 1,797,676

' EXTENSION SPOUT OIL CAN Filed June 24, 1929 Patented Mar. 24, 1931 y UNITED STATESPATENT OFFICE f MILTON L. BAKER, OF SAN RAFAEL, CALIFORNIA, ASSIGNOR TOSTANDARD OIL COM- .PANY OF CALIFORNIA, OF SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA, A CORPORATION OF DELA- ,WARE

EXTENSION-SPOUT OIL CAN Application led June 24,

This invention relates to small oil cans or the like suchas used for dispensing small quantities of a liquid. The invention relates particularly to a type of can provided with a relatively short nozzle which may be used when desired to dispense .the liquid but which is provided with an extension which may be pulled out from the short spout to produce a relatively long spout enabling parts of machinery to be oiled, to be accessible for oiling.

rThe preferred embodiment of the invention includes a relatively short outer tube secured to the can and carrying a telescoping inner tube which slides through packing means at the base of the outer tube.

The general object of the invention is to provide a device of this kind which can be used for oilin' by employingl the relatively short outer tube as a spout, or by using the spout with the extensie In using extension spouts of this kind, as ordinarily constructed, when the extension spout or tube is shoved down into the interior of the can, there is a tendency to develop pressure within the can causing some of the liquid to be forced out through the nozzle or spout. One of the objects of this invention is to overcome this diiliculty and to provide an extension spout or tube having means for preventing development of this pressure and etllux of the liquid when the extension tube is shoved back into the can.

Further objects of the invention will appear hereinafter.

The invention consists in the novel parts and combination of parts to be described hereinafter, all of which contribute to produce an etlicient extension spout oil can.

A preferred embodiment ot the invention is described in the following specification, while the broad scope of the invention is pointed out in the appended claims.

In the drawing:

Figure l is a vertical section through a can embodying this invention and showing the extension tube in its folded position.

Figure 2 is a view similar to Figure 1, but

duce a long spout or nozzle on the can. In

showing the extension tube extended to prov 1929. Serial N0. 373,315.

this view the inner tube is represented as broken away, indicating that the inner tube may have any desired length, limited only by the length of the can and outer tube.

eferring more particularly to the parts,

1 represents a can body of any desired shape, provided with a cover 2 whiclnis preferably formed with a neck 3 around an opening 4 which is closed by packing means preferably consisting ot' a disc 5 of flexible material such 60 as leather. This packing disc seats against a substantially'liat plate forming part of the base 6 of an outer tube or main nozzle 7. If desired, this base 6 may be secured by means of a thread, but in the type of can illustrated the base is permanently secured by welding or brazing its inner flange 8 to the side of the neck and clamps the edgeof the disc 5 against the end of the neck 3. y

Vhen the oil can is to be used Without employing the extension tube, the extension tube 9 is held in the position indicated in Figure l. This extension tube is provided at its outer end with a slightly enlarged head 110 that rests upon the end of the outer tube. This'75 head may be grasped to pull the inner tube outwardly. The outer tube 7 is preferably slightly conical.

Referring to Figure 2, when the extension tube is forced inwardly intothe interior of the can, there is a tendency to develop a. slight pressure in the liquid in the can which tends to produce an emission of the liquid through the nozzle or spout. I provi de means for relieving this pressure. For this purpose I prefer to form the outer end of the extension tube 9 with an elongated neck 11 of slightly smaller diameter than the inner portion of the tube. This diameter is slightly less than an opening 12 whichl I provide in the disc 5 through which the tube 9 slides. When the reduced neck 1l arrives at the disc 5, the interior of the can becomes vented, thereby permitting oil to pass through the packing means into the outer tube and also relieving the pressure and preventing' any possibility of the pressure in the interior of the can forcing any liquid up the tube 9 when it is not wanted. i

The outer tube 7 is formed of sheet metal 100 and its tip 13 tits fairly loosely around the inner tube. The packing disc holds the inner tube in its extended position.

The inner end of the extension tube 9 is formed with an expanded iange or collar 14 that seats against the inner face of the disc when the extension tube has been pulled out (see Figure 2).

In practice the difference in diameter of the outer extension 11 and the inner extension of the inner tube 9 would be very slight; just su'licient to insure-a proper air vent developing at the opening 12 When the tube is slid inwardly as indicated in Figure 1. The drawing shows the difference in diameter of these two sections of the inner tube slightly exaggerated. The inner tube can readily be constructed by telescoping the inner end of the outer extension 11 in the larger portion ot the tube and welding or brazing the outer extension in place.

It is understood that the embodiment of the invention described herein is only one of the many embodiments this invention may take, and I do not Wish to be limited in the practice of the invention, nor in the claims, to the particular embodiment set forth.

IVhat I claim is:

1. An oil can having a delivery spout including an outer tube, an inner tube telescoping Within the same, packing means for packing the inner tube and permitting the same to slide freely in and out in the outer tube, said inner tube having means disposed toward its outer end for relieving the ressure Within the can when the inner tu e is sho'v ed back into the can.

2. An oil can having a delivery spout including an outer tube, an inner tube telescoping Within the same, packing means Jfor packing the inner tube and permitting the same to slide freely in and out in the outer tube, said inner tube having an extension at its outer end of reduced diameter operating to relieve the pressure Within the can when the inner tube is shoved back into the can.

3. An oil can having a delivery spout including an outer tube, an inner tube telescoping Within the same, a packing disc at the base of the outer tube and having an opening through which the inner tube slides for packing the inner tube, said inner tube having means disposed toward its outer end for relieving the pressure Within the can when the inner tube is shoved back into the same.

4. An oil can having a delivery spout including an outer tube, an inner tube telescoping within the same, packing means for packing the inner tube and permitting the same to slide freely in and out in the outer tube, said inner tube having an extension at its outer end of reduced diameter to break the seal of the packing means when in regis try therewith.

5. An oil can having a delivery spout including an outer tube and an inner tube telescoping within the same, packing means for packing the inner tube and permitting the same to slide freely in and out in the outer tube, said inner tu e having an extension at its outer end of reduced diameter, opera-ting when the same is located at the packing means to permit the liquid to flow through the packing means into the outer tube.

6. An oil can having a body with an up- Wardly extending neck, a delivery spout including an outer tube and an inner tube telescoping Within the same, and packing means consisting of a disc of iexible material mounted on the can at the base of the outer tube, said outer tube having a plate forming a seat for the disc and clamping the disc against the end of the neck, said disc having an opening lthrough which the inner tube slides for packing the same. y

7 An oil can having a body with an upwardly extending neck, a delivery spout including an outer tube and an inner tube telescoping Within the same, and packing means consisting or a diseoflexible material mountA ed on the can at the base of the outertube,said outer tube having a plate forming a seat for the disc and clamping the disc against the end of the neck, said disc having an opening through Which the tube slides for packing the same, said inner tube constructed with its outer portion of reduced diameter so that whenin its retracted position into the outer tube the reduced portion of the inner tube will lie adjacent the opening in the disc.

Signed at San Francisco, Calif., this 10th day of June, 1929.

MILTON L. BAKER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5846011 *Feb 7, 1997Dec 8, 1998Melvin BernsteinBottle with built-in telescoping applicator head and spout for applying fluid to a body
US5908256 *Jan 14, 1997Jun 1, 1999Bernstein; MelvinBottle with built-in telescoping applicator head and valve therein
US20120080457 *Oct 3, 2011Apr 5, 2012Lovinger Robert APowder delivery system
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/478, 222/211, 222/525
International ClassificationF16N3/00, F16N3/04, B65D25/38, B65D25/44
Cooperative ClassificationF16N3/04, B65D25/44
European ClassificationB65D25/44, F16N3/04