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Publication numberUS1799126 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 31, 1931
Filing dateApr 7, 1928
Priority dateApr 7, 1928
Publication numberUS 1799126 A, US 1799126A, US-A-1799126, US1799126 A, US1799126A
InventorsSchirmer Cyrus T
Original AssigneeHoltzercabot Electric Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hospital switch
US 1799126 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 31, 1931.

C. T. SCHiRMER HOSPITAL SWITCH Filed April '7, 1928 TRA Patented Mar. 31, 1931 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CYRUS '1. S OIIIWTON', IASSAOHUSE'ITS, ASSIGIIOB TO THE HOLTZEB- OABO'I. ELMIBIC coxrm, OI BOXBUBY, IMG ACHUSET'I'S, A CORPORATION OF mssncrrumrs App1ioation fled April 7, The present invention relates to signaling devices of the type useful in hospital call stems.

The object of the present inventionis to.

reorganize and improve signaling devices of this general nature and to this end the invention consists in the signaling device hereinafter described and particularly defined in the claims.

In the accompanying drawings illustrating the preferred form of the invention, Fig. 1 is a front elevation of the flush wall receptacle with the plug switch shown in dot and dash lines; Fig. 2 is a rear view-of the switch;

Fig. 3 is a sectional elevation of the switch on line 3-3 of Fi 4; Fi 4 is a front elevation of the switc with t e cover partiallybroken away indicating the switch in 01! position; Fig. 5 is a vlew similar to Fig. 4 with the switch in on position including a partial section on line 5-5 of Fig. 7; Fig. 6 1s a section on line 6-6 of Fig. 4; Fig. 7 is a section on line 77 of Fig. '5; and Fig. 8 is a detail view of the actuating bulb.

The illustrated embodiment of the invention comprises a signaling device for a hosnot be improperlfy pital call s stem and includes a wall box 10 avin a ush wall receptacle 12 provided with our split sockets 14, 16, 18 and 20 to receive the corresponding plugs of a switch box 22. The switch box 22 is operated by remote control means consisting of a tube 24 connecting the switch box and a comressible bulb 26, which latter is kept at the edside ofthe atient. To permit separable connection of the switch box 22 and the flush receptacle 12, the switch box has in the back four protruding plugs 28, 30, 32 and 34 to be received respectively in the receptacle sockets'14, 16, 18 and 20. As shown in Figs. 1 and 2, the sockets and plugs are asymmetrically arranged so that the switch box canconnected to the. receptacle. The rear 0 the receptacle is mounted in a wall outlet box and the signaling wires are connected to the contact sockets in the usual way. The contact socket 14 1s a main current supply socket and the sockets 16 and 18 are connected with wires leading to two nosrrran swrrcn 1928. Serial I0. 288,871.

electrical connections are established from the contact 14 to each of the contacts 16 and 18 and theseconnections are maintained until the device is reset by the answering nurse.

A momentary connection is also established between the contact 14 and the contact 20 to give a short audible signal. To actuate the call system as above described the switch box is constructed inthe following manner. It comprises an insulatin casing to which a front cover 36 is attache the four contact plugs being molded inthe base or rearface of thecasing. The main signal plugs and 32 are diagonally opposed and terminate in switch contacts 38 and 40 which protrude within the casing slightl beyond the base of the switch box. Centra y disposed between the diagonal plugs 30 and 32 is a post or bolt 42 which extends from into the casing, be ing s cured in place by a nut 44. A rotatable switc bar 46 is mounted on the bolt and a torsion spring 48 which surrounds the bolt tends to turn the switch bar into the position shown in Fig. 5 where it bridges the rotrudingcontac'ts 38 and 40. The ends of the torsion spring are secured to a projection 50 on the switch arm and to a nut 52 secured on the end of the bolt 42. A conducting strip 54 which is recessed in the base of the switch box, connects the main supply plug 28 with the bolt 42 so that when the switch arm turns into the position shown in Fig.

5, an electrical connection is established from of the main signal plugs 30 and 32 and their corresponds ing receptacle contacts 16 and 18. switch arm isnormally retained in oil po sition by means of a metal catch 56 projectw ing above the inner surface of the base. To

operate the switch the lower end" of the} switch arm 46 is raised above the catch 56, thereby permitting the torsion slpring to turn the arm into on position. he spring is current is -conducted to the switch arm through the torsion spring.

The actuating means for the switch arm will now be described. The 'base of the switch box is recessed at 58 to form a compression chamber and this chamber is closed by a flexible diaphragm 60 which is held in place by a ring 62 secured to-the base by screws. The switch holding projection 56 is formed integrally with the ring 62. As shown in Fig. 6, the ring 62 and the diaphragm 60 are received in" an annular depression 63 "surrounding the compression chamber and the catch 56 protrudes slightly above the wall of the depression. A tube 64 is molded in the bottom of the switch box and communicates with the compression chamber, this tube being connected with the flexible tube 24 which leads to the bulb 26. A metal disc 66 of less diameter than the ring 56 overlies the diaphragm 60 and is supported by a thin flexible metal strip 67 which is secured under the nut 44 of the main center bolt 42. The disc 66 lies immediately under the end of the switch arm 46 so that when the bulb 26 is compressed, the diaphragm is raised and the switch arm is lifted over the projection 56, thus'permitting it'to turn and engage the contacts 38 and 40. The movement of the switch to on position is limited by a forwardly extended bent portion 68 of the switch arm which projects through a slot 70 of the cover. This projection 68 also serves as a resetting means to return the switch to the position illustrated in Fig. 4. 1

The movement of the diaphragm upon compression of the bulb 26 is also employed to energize a momentary signal circuit which is connected to the socket 20. To this end, the shank of the plug 34 extends through the base of the switch box and a wire 7 2'is connected to the plug 34 by means of a nut 74 which is threaded onto the shank diaphragm causes the flexible strip 66 to engage with the projection 80 and thereby to close the momentary signal circuit. Upon release of the pressure in the bulb 26, the

diaphragm collapses and the audible signal tinuously energized until'the switch is reset.

The momentary signal contact which connects into a momentary signal circuit through the receptacle socket 20 is employed to energize a buzzer or other temporary signal. Inasmuch as the purpose of this signal is merely to attract attention to the operation of the annunciator, it is required to be only temporary. The momentary signal, therefore, operates when the bulb-is compressed and stops when the bulb is released.

Although the invention in its preferred form has been illustrated and described, it is understood that the invention is not limited to such preferred construction. For exam ple, the switch may be operated byother remote control means than a compressible bulb. Moreover, the term plug as used in the claims is inclusive of any contact-making means, such as sockets or plug and socket connections.

- Having thus described the invention, what is claimed is:

1. A signaling device having, in combination, a rotatable switch lever, a signal circuit contact, a catch normally holding the. switch lever in off position and out of en- 2. A signaling device having, in combination, a rotatable switch arm, a contact adapted to be engaged by the switch arm, a catch for holding the switch arm in off position out of engagement with the contact, a torsion and compression spring acting to hold the switch arm against the catch when in off position and to press the switch lever against the contact in on position,

and also to rotate the switch arm into engagement with the contact when released from the catch, and remote control means for releasing the switch arm trom the catch.

3. A signaling device having,-in combination, a rotatable switch arm, a post on which the arm is loosely mounted to permit rotative and rocking movements, a contact adapted to be engaged by the switch arm, a latch normally holding the switch arm in ofi position, a compression and torsion spring to press axially 0 the 0st against the arm to old the arm in latc ed position and tending to rotate the arm into contact engaging position, and manually controlled means for rocking the arm out of engagement with the latch to permit it to be rotated into engagement with the contact.

4. A signaling device having, in combination, a rotatable switch arm, a post on which the arm is loosely mounted to permit rotative and rocking movements, a contact adapted to be engaged by the switch arm, a latch normally holding the switch arm in oil position, a compression and torsion spring to ress axially of the post again-st the arm to iiold the arm in latched position and tending to rotate the arm into contact engaging position, the'spring forming conducting means to conduct current to the arm, and manually controlled means for rocking the arm out of engagement with the latch to permit it to be rotated into engagement with the contact.

5. A signaling device having, in combination, a rotatable switch arm, a post on which the arm is loosely mounted to permit rotative and rocking movements, a contact adapted to be engaged by the switch arm, a latch normally holding the switch arm in off position, a compression and torsion spring to press axially of the post against the arm to hold the arm in latched position and tending to rotate the arm into contact engaging position, a release including a flexible diaphragm adapted to rock the arm out of engagement with the latch, and a manually controlled bulb for expanding the diaphragm.

6. A signaling device having, in combination, a rotatable switch arm, a post on which the arm is loosely mounted to permit rotative and rocking movements, a contact adapted to be enga ed by the switch arm, a latch normally hol ing the switch arm in. oil position, a compression and torsion spring to press axially of the post against the arm to hold the arm in latched position and tending to rotatethe arm into contact engaging position, the spring forming conducting means to conduct current to the arm, a release including a flexible diaphragm adapted to rock the arm out of engagement with the latch, and a manually controlled bulb for expanding the diaphragm.

7 A signaling device having, in combination, a rotatable switch arm, a post on which the arm is loosely mounted to permit rotative and rocking movements, a contact adapted to be engaged by the switch arm, a latch normally holding the switch arm in ofi position, a compression and torsion spring to press axially of the post against the arm to hold the arm in latched position and tending to rotate the arm into contact engaging positiommanually controlled means forfrocking the arm out of engagement with the latch to permit it to be rotated into engagement wit the contact,.and a contact adapted to be momentarily engaged by said manually controlled means.

8. A signaling device having, in combination, a rotatable switch arm, a post on which the arm is loosely mounted to permit rotative and rocking movements, a contact adapted to be engaged by the switch arm, a latch normally holding the switch arm in oil position, a compression and torsion spring to press axially of the post against the arm to old the arm in latched position and tending to rotate the arm into contact engaging position, a release including a flexible diaphragm adapted to rock the arm out of engagement with the latch, a manually controlled'bulb for expanding the diaphragm, and momentary signal contacts including a contact carried by the diaphragm and a stationary contact adapted to be engaged therewith.

9.- A hospital switch having, in combination, a visible signal connection, an audible signal connection, patient controlled means for operating the two signal connections on the first operation of such patient controlled means and for operating the audible signal connections on each subsequent operation of the patient controlled means.

10. A hospital switch having, in combination, a visible signal connection, means for actuating it, a latch for holding it against actuation, an audible signal connection, patient controlled means for operating the two signal connections by releasing the latch for the visible signal connection and operating the audible signal connection so that on the first operation of the patient controlled

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2562847 *Mar 5, 1946Jul 31, 1951Earl B SpencerPneumatic pendant control for electric switches
US2933570 *Jan 6, 1958Apr 19, 1960Kenco Pump Division Of The AmePressure sensitive pump control
US3122731 *Oct 23, 1961Feb 25, 1964Hutchison Robert WHospital signal device
US4298863 *Feb 10, 1980Nov 3, 1981St. Anthony Hospital SystemsPortable patient call
Classifications
U.S. Classification200/83.00R, 200/81.00H, 200/51.6
International ClassificationH01H3/24, H01H3/00
Cooperative ClassificationH01H3/24
European ClassificationH01H3/24