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Publication numberUS1799941 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 7, 1931
Filing dateAug 27, 1926
Priority dateAug 27, 1926
Publication numberUS 1799941 A, US 1799941A, US-A-1799941, US1799941 A, US1799941A
InventorsWulle William A
Original AssigneeWulle William A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Conduit
US 1799941 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 7, 1931 w WULLE 1,799,941

- UONDUTT Filed Aug. 27, 1926 P Sheets-Sheet 1 WI MLL/AM {Lb u; 45,

April 7, 1931. w. A. wu| 1,799,941

CONDUIT Filed Aug. 27, 1926 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented Apr. 7, 1931 PATENT OFFICE WILLIAM A. ml, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS GONDUI'I.

Application fled Ann: 27, 1926. Serial Io. 181,887.

This invention pertains to construction for conduits such as are used to contain electric circuit wires and thelike.

In the ordinary conduit construction in the I wiring of buildings and the like, a great deal of time is consumed in threading the ends of conduit sections so as to be able to secure the same to the various fittings and to each other.

One of the objects of this invention is to 1 rovide a construction whereby the necessity or threading the ends of 'conduit sections would be eliminated and means provided for securin the conduit sections to each other or to suita le fittings.

Another object of this invention is to provide a fitting which may be applied to a conduit section in a simple manner and in a short time and which will provide means for securing the conduit.

Another object is to provide a threaded fitting which may be applied, without special tools, to a conduit section and which will enable the same to be connected with other standard conduit fittings.

Further objects will appear from the following description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which Figure 1 is a sectional view of a conduit fitting embodying this invention Figure 2 is a sectional view oi the attachable sleeve;

Figure 3 is a side view of a similar sleeve showing another embodiment of this invention;

Figure 4 is a section on line 4-4 of Figure 3 Figure 5 is a partial section, similar to Figure 2, but showin means for roughing the interior surface 0 the sleeve;

Fi re 6 is a sectional view of a sleeve showing another embodiment of this invention' Figure 7 is a section on line 7-7 of Figure 6;

Figures 8 and 9 are sectional views show-. ing methods of connecting a conduit section to an outlet box in accordance with this invention; and

Fi re 10 is a view showing a method of attac ing two conduit sections together.

In accordance with this invention a fitting is provided which may be attached to the plain end of a section of conduit by a simple operation, such as slippin the fitting over the end of the conduit. This fitting takes the form, preferably, of a sleeve threaded on the outside with a thread adapted to fit in a standard fitting or connection of the next larger size of conduit to that of the section to which the sleeve is a plied. The sleeve is so constructed that, when passed over the end of the conduit, it will securely grip the same so as to provide a secure fastening therefor.

Referring to the accompanying drawing, 1 designates a section of conduit of any ordinary type, such as may be used for housing the wires of an ordinary wiring installation.

In accor ance with this invention when a section of conduit is to be connected to another similar section or to a fitting, it is simply cut to the required length and then a s eeve 2 is forced over the end thereof. The sleeve 2' is constructed to have a bore which is restricted relatively to the outside diameter of the conduit to which it is applied. The sleeve may then be forced over the end of the conduit so as to grip the same. The body of the sleeve may be made resilient so as to grip the conduit with a resilient ressure. 30 This may be done by slotting the b0 y of the conduit with slots 3. The bore of the sleeve may be constructed so as to taper from opposite ends in order to provide a restricted waist 4 of slightly smaller diameter than the 35 conduit 1. When the'sle'eve is forced over the pipe, the body will then give at the waist 4 and grip theoutside of the pipe with a strong, but resilient, ressure. The outside of the sleeve 2 is provided with threads 5 of a size corresponding to the next larger standard size than the conduit 1. With the sleeve in place on its end, the conduit may then be connected with any standard fitting or with another similar section of conduit by any usual method, the size of fittings used, however, being the next larger size than the conduit 1. A method of connecting a conduit in this manner to an outlet box 6 is shown in Figure 1.

In order to insure a secure grip of the sleeve upon the conduit, the interior surface of the former may be roughened in any suitable manner. In Fi re 2, for instance, the waist 4 provides a ri ge adapted to grip the conduit with a considerable frictional resistance. In Figures 3 and 4, the sleeve is shown cut longitudinally by slots 7 so as to render the body of the sleeve resilient as in the case of the slots 3, but the slots 7 are given a zig-zag form and the edges thereof punched inwardly, as shown in Figure 4, so as to provide teeth 8 on the interior surface of the sleeve which will bite into the surface of the conduit 1 and hold the same securely. When the sleeve is forced over the conduit its outside diameter is increased slightl and when the sleeve is screwed into the fitting or a nut screwed on the outside of the sleeve, the latter is again compressed and the rough interior surface forced tight against the pipe.

Figure 5 shows the sleeve 2 provided with a series of internal ridges 9, providing teeth adapted to grip the conduit. As shown, these ridges may be arranged in the form of an internal thread in such a way that, when the conduit is turned with a wrench, the tendency will be to screw the sleeve onto the pipe. The teeth 8 of Figures 3 and 4 may also be so arranged that their rows form, in effect, a thread for the same purpose. In fact, any of the tooth arrangements described herein may be so formed. The sleeve may also be provided with a head 10 of angular form so that a wrench may be applied thereto for turning the sleeve in order to thread the same into its fitting. The head 10 may also be provided with a set screw 11, or similar fastening, in order to increase the hold of the sleeve upon the conduit 1.

In Figures 6 and 7 a sleeve 2 is shown formed of light metal by drawing in a die or other similar process. This sleeve is also provided with slots 3, which render the same resilient, and a head 10, which may be either angular or round so that a wrench may be a plied thereto for turning the sleeve. In t e case of a round head, of course, a pipe wrench is used for this purpose. The end of the sleeve may be provided with a rounded edge 12 adapted to en age the wires as they emerge from the conduit. This curled-in edge may also be provided to engage a gasket 13 clamped etween the end of the conduit and said edge and adapted to render the fitting waterproof. The rearward edge of the head 10 may be provided with teeth 14 to increase the friction on the pipe. These teeth may also be arranged in screw-thread formation. The rounded edge 12 may also be applied to any of the other modifications of the sleeve, as shown, for instance, in Figure 2.

Figures 1, 8 and 9 illustrate methods of connecting the conduit to fittings. In Figure 1 the fitting 6 is provided with an extension 15 which is threaded to receive the sleeve 2. This fitting is provided with an inwardly extending collar 16 having a rounded edge over which the emerging wires may be turned.

In Figure 8 t e conduit is applied to a fitting, such as the ordina knock-out box, represented by the numera 17. In this case the sleeve is passed through the'knock-out hole in the box and heldby nuts 18 on the inside and outside of the box, while the usual collar or bushing 19 is applied to the end of the sleeve so as to provide a rounded edge 20.

In Figure 9 the box or other fitting 21 has the sleeve 2 mounted thereon by crimping the edge of the sleeve into the hole in the box as shown at 22. This also provides a rounded edge to protect the wires. A nut 23 is then screwed up on the sleeve 2 from the outside end. As the threads on the sleeve are the usual pi e threads which are tapered, screwing up t e nut 23 will clamp the sleeve securely against the conduit.

In Figure 10 two sections of conduit are shown connected together by an ordinary coupling 24. This coupling is a size larger. than the conduit 1, and the sleeves on the two sections are screwed into it in the usual manner. 1

It will be seen that this invention provides a very simple construction for erecting conduit work. The construction is such that very little time is required for appl ing the necessary securing means to the end of a conduit section. The slow operation of threading the end of the pipe is entirely eliminated. Also the tools required for such threading operation are not necessary. It is only necessary to cut the conduit to the proper length, slip a sleeve 2 over the end and then screw the same into the required fitting, said fitting being of the next larger size of conduit. The sleeve should fit closely enough that it may be driven upon the end of the pipe and will then grip the same tightly so that a wrench may be applied to the pipe and the sleeve screwed into the fitting. The interior of the sleeve may be roughened, as described, so as to insure a secure hold of the sleeve on the pipe. In this way conduits may be run vertically, and this fastening will be capable of supporting the weight of the pipe. The invention is easil adapted to all types of fittings used in mo ern conduit construction.

It is obvious that various changes ma be made in the details of construction wit out departing from the spirit of this invention; it is to be understood, therefore, that this invention is not limited to the specific details shown and described.

Havin thus described the invention what is claime is:

1. In a connection for metal conduits, in combination with an internally threaded connecting member, a sleeve externally threaded to fit said member and having a resilient body circumferentially continuous at both ends and having a portion of its bore contracted intermediate its ends to a diameter less than the outside diameter of the conduit,

said sleeve being adapted to be sprung over the conduit thereby enlarging its external threaded portion intermediate its ends.

2. In a connection for metal conduits, in combination with an internally threaded conmeeting member, a sleeve externally threaded to fit said member and having a longitudinally split resilient body circumferentially continuous at both ends and having a portion of its bore contracted intermediate its ends to a diameter less than the outside diameter of the conduit, said sleeve being adapted to be sprung over the conduit thereby enlarging its external threaded portion intermediate its ends.

3. In a connection for metal conduits, in

combination with an internally threaded connecting member, a sleeve externally threaded to fit said member and having a resilient body circumferentially continuous at both ends and having a portion of its bore contracted intermediate its ends to a diameter less than the outside diameter of the conduit. said sleeve being adapted to be sprung over the conduit thereby enlarging its external '3 threaded portion intermediate its ends, and means providing a tooth in the bore of said sleeve adapted to bite into the conduit.

4. In a connection for metal conduits, in combination with an internally threaded conmeeting member, a sleeve externally threaded to fit said member and having a resilient body circumferentially continuous at both ends and having a slot adapted to render said sleeve expandible, the edge portion of saidsleeve 40 ad acent said slot being forced inwardly to a diameter less than the outside diameter of the conduit to provide a tooth adapted to bite into the conduit.

In testimony whereof I affix my signature this 5th day of Au st, 1926.

WI LIAM A. WULLE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2696995 *Sep 17, 1951Dec 14, 1954Herter Inc SMechanism for interconnecting gun accessories with the muzzle end portion of gun barrels
US2986060 *Jun 22, 1959May 30, 1961Lifka CharlesConnector fittings for thin wall conduit
US3287032 *Aug 7, 1964Nov 22, 1966Gen Dynamics CorpCoupling for tubular members
US4220361 *Feb 1, 1979Sep 2, 1980The Aro CorporationConnector for plastic tubing
US4790571 *Apr 14, 1987Dec 13, 1988Riva Calzoni S.P.A.Quick-coupling connector group for pipes, piles or the like
US5020204 *Nov 28, 1989Jun 4, 1991Eugene DesairTool for aligning the connecting of an exhaust manifold to an engine block
US5799984 *Mar 7, 1996Sep 1, 1998Anr Manufacturing, Inc.Conduit connection
US6093108 *Mar 17, 1998Jul 25, 2000Gkn Automotive AgBellows device, its application to a transmission joint, and ring for a device of this kind
US6878069Jun 5, 2003Apr 12, 2005Sps Technologies, Inc.Helical groove fasteners and methods for making same
US7017952 *Jun 21, 2002Mar 28, 2006Maclean-Fogg CompanyFluid connector
US7108607Feb 4, 2005Sep 19, 2006Sps Technologies, Inc.Helical groove fasteners and methods for making same
US7900854 *Mar 8, 2011American Agriculture Products, LlcFiltration and cleaning system for sprinkler irrigation drop nozzles
US7900968 *Feb 13, 2007Mar 8, 2011Schlumberger Technology CorporationElectrical isolation connector for electromagnetic gap sub
US8011866Sep 6, 2011Maclean-Fogg CompanyLocking fastener assembly
US8308199Oct 25, 2010Nov 13, 2012Schlumberger Technology CorporationElectrical isolation connector for electromagnetic gap sub
US9239122Apr 5, 2013Jan 19, 2016Single Buoy Moorings, Inc.Pipe connection
US20040007871 *Jun 21, 2002Jan 15, 2004Robert BrewerFluid connector
US20040245772 *Jun 5, 2003Dec 9, 2004Sps TechnologiesHelical groove fasteners and methods for making same
US20050129485 *Feb 4, 2005Jun 16, 2005Sps Technologies, Inc.Helical groove fasteners and methods for making same
US20050135897 *Feb 4, 2005Jun 23, 2005Sps Technologies, Inc.Helical groove fasteners and methods for making same
US20070241214 *Apr 9, 2007Oct 18, 2007Gerald BeerFiltration and cleaning system for sprinkler irrigation drop nozzles
US20080124186 *Nov 15, 2007May 29, 2008Abb Patent GmbhDevice for fastening an attachment to a measuring tube of a coriolis mass flowmeter
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US20110036557 *Oct 25, 2010Feb 17, 2011Schlumberger Technology CorporationElectrical Isolation Connector For Electromagnetic Gap Sub
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Classifications
U.S. Classification285/323, 16/108, 285/382, 220/3.2, 411/395, 285/404, 411/418
International ClassificationH02G3/02, H02G3/06
Cooperative ClassificationH02G3/065
European ClassificationH02G3/06C1F