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Publication numberUS1800150 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 7, 1931
Filing dateJan 19, 1928
Priority dateJan 29, 1927
Publication numberUS 1800150 A, US 1800150A, US-A-1800150, US1800150 A, US1800150A
InventorsMusgrave Joseph Leslie, Herring Edgar
Original AssigneeMusgrave Joseph Leslie, Herring Edgar
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Heating and cooling of buildings
US 1800150 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 7, 1931. J. L. MUSGRAVE ET AL 1,300,150

HEATTNG AND COOLING OF BUILDTNGS Filed Jan. 19, 1928 V j} A Patented Apr. 7, 1931 UNITED- STATES PATENT oFFI cE JOSEPH LESLIE KUSGBAVE AND EDGAR G, 01' LONDON, ENGLAND m'rme AND COOLING OF BUILDINGS Application Med January 19, 1928, Serial No. 247,995, and in Great Britain January 28, 1927.

This invention refers to the heating or cooling of the walls, floors or ceilings of a building by the circulation or passa e of a heating or cooling fluid or other eating 5 medium through a system of pipes covered by a material which diffuses the heat such heat being transmitted to the material in which the pipes are carried or supported and from the surface of which material said heat radiates, and has special reference to that system known as panel heating. The

' object fof the h means or carrying or supportin t e ipes through which the heating 'mefium c irculates or passes, and also to obtain a better diffusion of the heat over. the material in which the said pipes are carried or supported from the surface of which material said heat radiates. v According to this invention the pipes through which the heating medium circulates or passes are carried or supported by a frame or casing made of sheet metal, as-

bestos, or other suitable material; Grooves or channels are formed in the surface of the frame or casin for the pipes to rest in, the number of suc grooves or channels being determined according to the number of pipes used in the system, which pipes are then covered with slabs of cork or other insulating material.

Outwardly projecting flan es are preferably formed on the edges 0 the frame or vcaslng, running parallel with the grooves or channels, to promote radiation and hinder convection and thereby ensure the full- 'est extent of radiation of heat from the surface of said frame or casing, and if desired such flanges may be formed so as to project inwardly to cover and embrace the pipes or tubes and insulating material. Or the frame or casing may be made to entirely enclose the pipes and insulating material and an air space may be formed between the insulating material and the frame or casing.

In some cases instead of forming grooves or channels in the frame or casing to receive the pipes or tubes, we may form the frame or casing upon or against which the pipes invention is to devise newrest with a flat surface, and, if desired, enclose each pipe in a groove or channel made from a separate piece of metal or other material, and the space between the pipes and the enclosing channels may be filled in with a composition which when set will bind or cement the arts together.

When higli temperature fluids are used as a heating medium we ma employ a spreader or spreaders, made 0 metal or a non-conducting material, interposed between the pipes and the slabs with which they are covered.

The invention is illustrated on the accompanying drawings.

ig. 1 is a sectional view showing the pipes through which the heating or cooling medium circulates laid in grooves or channels made in the frame or casing by which they are carried or supported.

Fig. 2 is a similar view to Fig. 1 showing each pipe enclosed in a groove or channel made separately from the frame or casing, the frame or casing being formed with a flat surface.

Fig. 3 is an enlarged broken sectional view showing how the parts, in the method shown by Fig. 2, may be cemented together by filling in the enclosing channels with a composition.

Fig. 4 is a broken sectional view showing how outwardly and inwardly projecting flanges may be formed on the edges of the frame or casing to hinder convection and ensure the fullest extent of radiation of heat from the surface of such frame or casing.

Fig. 5 is a sectional view showing the frame or casing which supports the pipes entirely enclosing said pipes and insulatin material, an air space being formed between the insulating material and the frame or casing.

6 is a broken sectional-view showing the frame or casing with a flat surface and a block or blocks of insulating material interposed between each pipe.-

Fig. 7 is a broken sectional view showing the frame or casing with a flat surface, the insulating material being formed with grooves or channels to over 03m the P P r A represents the frame or casing of anly suitable area, a the grooves or channe s formed in: said frame or'casin B the insulating material, and D the pipes through fvhichfthe heating or cooling fluid circus ates.

In the construction shown by Fig. 1 grooves or channels a are formed m the A, in which grooves surface of the casing I the pi es D rest, sai pipes D being covered with 's abs of cork or other insulating material B; whereas in the construction shown by Fig. 2 the frame or casin A is formed with a flat surface and the pipes D, which rest upon this flat surface, are each enclosed in a groove or channel a made from a separate piece of metal or other material. If desired the space between the (pipes and the enclosing channel may be fille position a which when set binds or cements the parts together, as clearly shown by Fig. 3.

t Fig. 4 we have shown the frame or casing Aformed with outwardly rojecting flanges a on the edges. These angcs are provided to radiate heat therefrom and hinder convection of heat around the edges of the slab B so as to ensure the fullest extent of radiation of heat from the surface of the frame or casing A. Inwardly rojecting flanges a may also be provi ed for which they are covered, as clearly shown by F ii. 5.

t Fig. 6 we have shown the frame or casing A with a flat surface, the pipes D being laid upon such surface and a block or blocks of insulating material 6 interposed between each pipe D, and the insulating material B above.

In the example shown by Fig. 7 the frame or casing A is also formed with a flat surface upon which the pipes D rest. In this case we have shown the insulating material with a com- 7 casing or covenn ghtoibe removed therewith from the slab. einsulating slab, metal 281180) and pipes between them constitute a unit, bein assembled such, and being readily. built into the wal l,-. ceiling'or floor ofa room. Y

What we claim as our invention and wish secure by Letters Patent is 1. A heating 'or cooling anel of the kind describedcomprisin a s ab of insulating material, a sheet of heat conducting inaterial extendin across same, and pipes for the flow of fluid therei confined between said sheet and slab and contacting with said sheet, said slab, sheetand pipes constituting a unit adapted to be built in the wall, floor or ceiling of a room.

2. A heating or cooling panel of the character describe comprising a slab of insulating material, a sheet of conducting material extendin across same, and pipes for the flow of sheetand slab and contacting with said sheet, said slab and sheet being in contact and one of them having rooves in which the pipes are located, sai pipes constituting a unit adapted to be built in the wall, floor or ceiling of a room.

3. A heating or cooling panel of the character described comprising a slab of insulating material, a sheet of conducting material extendin across same, and pipes for the flow of uid therein confined between said sheet and slab and contacting with said sheet, said slab and sheet being in contact aid-therein confined between saidslab, sheet and and the sheet being bent to form grooves receiving the pipes.

In testimony whereof we have signed our names to this specification.

JOSEPH LESLIE MUSGRAVE. EDGAR HEREIN G.

B formed with grooves or channels b which fit over or onto the pipes D.

In each embodiment of the invention the pipes are disconnected from the insulating slab so as to be freely removed therefrom when or after the casing or covering is removed from the slab, and as shown in Figs.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2469963 *Jun 19, 1946May 10, 1949Grosjean Harry WHeating unit
US2506118 *Jan 13, 1947May 2, 1950Taylor Merritt ICluster controller
US2579898 *May 3, 1949Dec 25, 1951Milton BruckerMold for heat curing thermosetting resins
US2621490 *May 5, 1950Dec 16, 1952Int Harvester CoRefrigerant condenser
US2625378 *Mar 25, 1950Jan 13, 1953Gen ElectricHeat transfer assembly
US2646259 *Feb 2, 1950Jul 21, 1953Houdaille Hershey CorpCondenser
US2655348 *Nov 17, 1949Oct 13, 1953Johns ManvilleHeat exchange and sound absorbing wall unit
US2660412 *Mar 17, 1949Nov 24, 1953Houdaille Hershey CorpHeat exchange panel and its method of manufacture
US2666981 *Mar 8, 1949Jan 26, 1954Houdaille Hershey CorpMethod of making heat exchangers
US2681796 *Jan 5, 1951Jun 22, 1954Houdaille Hershey CorpRadiant floor heating panel
US2688794 *Jun 1, 1951Sep 14, 1954Gen ElectricMethod of making heat exchange apparatus
US2691813 *Aug 15, 1950Oct 19, 1954Rudy Mfg CompanyMethod of constructing refrigeration evaporators
US2800308 *Aug 13, 1946Jul 23, 1957Johns ManvilleHeating system
US3037746 *Nov 10, 1958Jun 5, 1962Williams Wesley LFloor covering for radiant heating installations
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US6910526 *Sep 19, 1996Jun 28, 2005Barcol-Air AgContact element and ceiling element for a heating and cooling ceiling
US7013964 *Jun 14, 2002Mar 21, 2006Snecma Propulsion SolideHigh temperature heat exchanger structure
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US7089706 *Jun 13, 2003Aug 15, 2006Isolpack S.P.A.Covering component for protecting outer surfaces of buildings from atmospheric agents, incorporating heat exchanger means, and system for the external covering of buildings using such a component
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Classifications
U.S. Classification165/56, 165/136, 165/49, 29/890.35
International ClassificationF25D23/06, F24D3/12
Cooperative ClassificationF25B2339/023, F28F2275/025, F25D23/061, F24D3/12
European ClassificationF25D23/06A, F24D3/12