Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1801451 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 21, 1931
Filing dateMar 12, 1929
Priority dateMar 12, 1929
Publication numberUS 1801451 A, US 1801451A, US-A-1801451, US1801451 A, US1801451A
InventorsHoward Parker
Original AssigneeBrown Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Multiple conduit and spacing element therefor
US 1801451 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 21, 1931. H. PARKER- MULTIPLE CONDUIT AND SPACING ELEMENT THEREFOR Filed March 12, 1929 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 jiwwzgm: 1 f 7 152mm? fwfwr.

April 21, 1931. H PARKER 1,801,451

MULTIPLE CONDUIT AND SPACING ELEMENT THEREFOR Filed March 12, '1929 a Sheets-Sheet 2 April 21, 1931. H PARKER MULTIPLE CONDUIT AND SPACING ELEMENT THEREFOR Filed March 12, 1929 3 Sheets-$heet 3 E vI I .I i

A a a M dig/ a.

STATE PATENT, OFFlE HQWARD EAEKER; @F BERLIN, NEW HAMPSHIRE, ASSIGNOB T0 BROWN COMIANY, 0F BERLHT, NEW HAMPSHIRE, A. CORPQRATION 0F M A INE MULTI PLE CQNDUIT AND SEPAGENG ELEMENT THEREFOR Application filed March 12, 1929. Serial Ito. 346,476.

This invention relates to multiple conduit sections each comprising a number of sections of single conduit firmly held together inispaced side-by-side relation. invention is applicable to conduit of any size or material, it is more especially concerned with fiber conduit such, for example, as may be made by rolling a sheet of wet cellulosic pulp under pressure on a mandrel until the desired wall thickness is obtained, then removing the tube of pulp from the mandrel and carefully drying it. The resultant product is comparatively light in weight but is tough and strong. When saturated withv a suitable waterproofing compound such as pitch or asphalt, it makes an excellent conduit section for various purposes, such conduit frequently being embedded in concrete after being laid. In laying multiple conduits, it is often advantageous and economical to build up multiple sections of single conduit sections, the latter being preferably uniformly spaced so that their ends will register properly with the corresponding ends of the conduits in the next succeeding section as laid. By assemloling multiple sections at the mill, transportation and laying of the conduit may be facilitated, this resulting in economy of time and labor. It is an object of this invention to provide an improved multiple conduit section which is strong, durable and simple, and which may be assembled with a minimum of effort and expense.

To this end I may provide spacer blocks with curved recesses to fit againstthe sides of conduit sections. In general, four such recesses are formed in each spacer block so that multiple sections may be built up with any desired numberof rows and columns of single conduit sections. The central portions of my spacing blocks are preferably apertured to save material in making the spacer blocks, to obtain mairimum lightness of weight consistent with strength, and to afiord longitudinal channels in the multiple conduit section, through which concrete provided to embed the conduit may 'bond longitudinally. If desired, ;ian additional line pf conduit may extend through the aper- While thetures of blocks alined longitudinally of the conduit.

"Various advantageous features of the invention will be apparent to one skilled in the art from the disclosure thereof in the description which follows and on the drawings of which,-

Figure 1 is a perspective view of a spacing element for multiple conduit embodying the invention. r

Figures 2 to 8, inclusive, are similar views of modified forms of spacer elements.

Figure 9 is an end elevation of a multiple conduit section comprising four individual conduits spaced by an element such as illustrated in Figure 1.

Figure 10 is an end elevation of a multi-- ple conduit in which are used elements as illustrated in Figure 2.

Figure 11 is an end elevation of a multiple conduit section in which are used spacer elements as illustrated in Figures 2 and 3.

Figure'12 is a fragmentary section on the line 12 -12 of Figure 11.

Figure 13 illustrates the use of spacers such as are illustrated in Figure 4.

Figure 14 illustrates the use of conduits of smaller size extending through the apertures of the spacer elements.

Figure 15' illustrates the use of spacers shown in Figures 4 and 5. t

Figure 16 illustrates the use of spacers shown in Figures 4, 5 and 6.

Figures 17 and 18 illustrate the use of the spacer shown Figure 7.

Figure 19 illustrates the use of spacers such as shown in Figure 8.

The spacer elements illustrated on the drawings are of the general shape of a cross,

each spacer having a central portion with a central portion which may be apertured as at 31 and from which extend four arms 32 at right angles to one another. These arms are of such length that the arcuate in contact with the arm. .In order to hold the parts of the multiple conduit section securely together, I may provide one or more suitable tie members 34 which may be a steel ribbon, a wire, a fiber strand or any other suitable tension device. If a metal tie member 34 be used, it may be desired .to break the continuous metal loop as by an insulating piece 35 to which the opposite ends of the tie member may be attached. This may be often desirable in such installations as where the conduit is to contain electric power cables carrying relatively high voltage alternatin currents. Each tie member 34 may pre erably be placed around the multiple conduit section in approximately the same plane as that of a spacer 1 element 30 so as to avoid distortion of the individual conduits 36 by inward and outward pressures thereon at difierent longitudinal points. Where it is desired to assemble six individual conduits in a multiple section, as illustrated in Figure 10, I may provide spacers 37 such as are illustrated in Figure 2. In this form, three of the arms 32 are of the same length as the arms 32 of the spacer 30, the fourth arm 38 of the spacer 37 being shorter. Thus the angular length of the arcuate edge surface 33 between two arms 32 is slightly over a quadrant, whereas the angular length oi the arcuate surface between an arm 32 and a shorter arm 38 may be substantially equal to a quadrant. The shorter arms 38 are necessitated, as shown in Figure 10, by reason of the fact that between the conduits of the middle pair, the arms of the two spacer elements 37 are opposed to each other, and hence must fall short of the line of centers between the middle pair of individual conduits. The arms 38 are preferably sufiiciently short to leave a suitable gap 39 between their ends when assembled in a multile conduit section. Where four pairs of individual conduits are" assembled in a row, as shown in Figure'll, the-spacers which are in contact with the pair of conduits at each end of the multiple conduit have a sinle short arm, as illustrated in Figure 2. etween the intermediate pairs of conduits, a spacer 40 is preferably used, this spacer of the length of the arm 38.

'rows of conduits may arms of the spacers 41 ma be long like the arms 32, the other two 'ad1acent arms being Figure 14 illustrates the use of the apertures 31 to receive smaller conduits 42. These conduits may be of such a size as to enter the aper-' tures 31 witha driving fit or may be suitably wedged or cemented therein.

Figure 15 illustrates a multiple conduit comprising four rows of three. Such an assembly may be made up of individual conduits spaced byelements 41 at the corners and by elements 43 between the intermediate rows, the elements 43 being preferably was illustrated in Figure 5, and each having a single long-arm 32 and three shorter arms 38. Figure 16 illustrates a conduit section comprising four rows of four. This multiple conduit may comprise spacing elements 41 at the corners, elements 43 at the outer intermediate portions, and a central element 44 which, as illustrated in Figure 6, has four short arms 38.

Figure 17 illustrates a multiple conduit section comprising a pair of individual conduits spaced by simple blocks 45.similar to that illustrated in Figure 7. These blocks may be provided with'two opposed arcuate faces to receive the individual conduits and to be in contact with them over a suitable angle of their outer surface. Figure 18 illustrates the possibility of using spacer elements 45 in assembling a multiple conduit of four or more individual conduits. This type of spacer also permits the assembling of multiple conduit sections in which the extend in directions oblique to the columns.

Figure 19 illustrates a multiple conduit of four individual conduits, these being spaced by elements 46 as illustrated in Figure 8. It is apparent that founof the elements 46 are substantially equivalent to one element 30,

the elements 46, however, being mutually" 2. A spacer block for multiple conduit having a central aperture and four arms extending outwardly in cruciform pattern,

A single conduit sections arranged in a plurality of rows and columns, means arranged at intervals along the section for laterally spacing the individual conduit sections, said means comprising cruciform blocks each having a central aperture and four radially extending arms defining quadrantal recesses fitting against the individual conduit sections, and tie members extending around the assembly.

4. A multiple conduit section comprising a plurality of rows and columns of uniformly spaced single conduit sections, spacing means between the individual conduits said means comprising centrally apertured blocks fitted between each group of four adjacent sections in the multiple section, the arc of contact between each adjacent block and section being approximately a quadrant, and tie members extending around the assembly.

5. A multiple conduit section comprising a plurality of rows and columns of uniformly spaced single conduit sections of uniform size, centrally apertured spacing blocks between said individual sections, each said block being in approximately quadrantal contact with four of said sections, smaller conduit sections extending through the apertures of said blocks, and tie members encircling the assembly.

6'. A multiple conduit section comprising a plurality of rows and columns of umformly spaced parallel single conduit sec- -tions of uniform size, means for laterally spacing the individual conduit sections, said means comprising cruciform blocks each having four radially extending arms defining quadrantal recesses fitting against the individual conduit sections, said blocks being arranged in sets, s aced alon the section, the blocks in eac said set" eing arranged in a common plane perpendicular to the axes of the single conduit sections, and a flexible tie member around the multiple section in the plane of each said set of blocks.

In testimony whereof I have afiixed my slgnature.

HOWARD PARKER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2910608 *Jun 13, 1955Oct 27, 1959Raytheon CoGrid support wedges
US3310623 *Jun 30, 1965Mar 21, 1967Vaughan Marion EExtension cord storage means
US3437297 *Sep 8, 1966Apr 8, 1969Anger KunststoffSupport members for pipes
US4199009 *Jul 6, 1976Apr 22, 1980Kyova CorporationConduit saddle
US4301838 *Apr 20, 1978Nov 24, 1981Domtar Inc.Modular conduit unit
US7559720 *Apr 27, 2007Jul 14, 2009Terratech Consulting Ltd.Culvert bundle for stream crossings and flow-through bridge abutments
US7600723 *Jan 25, 2007Oct 13, 2009Airbus Deutschland GmbhProtection hose arrangement for conductors installed in an aircraft
US8985529Dec 3, 2009Mar 24, 2015Aims International, Inc.Apparatus and methods for supporting an elongated member
US9004425 *May 8, 2012Apr 14, 2015ZF Friedrichshafen ACDamping device having a part mounted thereon
US9217519Aug 25, 2010Dec 22, 2015Aims International, Inc.Systems and methods for supporting tubular members
US9303791Mar 19, 2015Apr 5, 2016Asset Integrity Management Solutions, L.L.C.Apparatus and methods for supporting an elongated member
US9464735Dec 18, 2015Oct 11, 2016Asset Integrity Management Solutions, L.L.C.Systems and methods for supporting tubular members
US20070120015 *Jan 25, 2007May 31, 2007Klaus-Hinrich BorchersProtection hose arrangement for conductors installed in an aircraft
US20070253775 *Apr 27, 2007Nov 1, 2007Terratech Consulting Ltd.Culvert bundle for stream crossings and flow-through bridge abutments
US20120292470 *May 8, 2012Nov 22, 2012Zf Friedrichshafen AgDamping Device Having A Part Mounted Thereon
USD771478 *Jun 18, 2016Nov 15, 2016Underground Devices, Inc.Spacer
USD772044 *Jun 18, 2016Nov 22, 2016Underground Devices, Inc.Spacer
USD772045 *Jun 18, 2016Nov 22, 2016Underground Devices, Inc.Spacer
USD772046 *Jun 18, 2016Nov 22, 2016Underground Devices, Inc.Spacer
USD772047 *Jun 18, 2016Nov 22, 2016Underground Devices, Inc.Spacer
USD772048 *Jun 18, 2016Nov 22, 2016Underground Devices, Inc.Spacer
USD772049 *Jun 18, 2016Nov 22, 2016Underground Devices, Inc.Spacer
USD772050 *Jun 18, 2016Nov 22, 2016Underground Devices, Inc.Spacer
DE3231748A1 *Aug 26, 1982Mar 8, 1984Hilbers HeinrichCollector block with fire-safety exit-air connection for transport of air in chemical laboratories and the like
EP2370721A1 *Dec 3, 2009Oct 5, 2011AIMS International, Inc.Apparatus and methods for supporting an elongated member
EP2370721A4 *Dec 3, 2009Nov 5, 2014Aims International IncApparatus and methods for supporting an elongated member
Classifications
U.S. Classification138/112, 248/49
International ClassificationH02G9/06
Cooperative ClassificationH02G9/06
European ClassificationH02G9/06