Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1801710 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 21, 1931
Filing dateJan 25, 1929
Priority dateJan 25, 1929
Publication numberUS 1801710 A, US 1801710A, US-A-1801710, US1801710 A, US1801710A
InventorsAbbot Charles Greeley
Original AssigneeAbbot Charles Greeley
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for utilizing solar heat
US 1801710 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 21, 1931. c. G. ABBOT APPARATUS FOR UTILIZING SOLAR HEAT 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Jan. 25, 1929 Charles aflbboi,

April 21, 1931. c. e. ABBOT APPARATUS FOR UTILIZING SOLAR HEAT Filed Jan. 25, 1929 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Charles G. fibbct,

Patented Apr. 21, 1931 I UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE,

CHARLES GREELEY ABBOT, OF WASHINGTON, DISTRICT OF GOLUIBIA.

' APPARATUS IOIR. UTILIZING SOLAR HEAT Application filed January 25, 1929. Serial No. 335,013.

r This invention relates toap aratus for absorbin the heat of solar ra lation and for rendering it useful for various purposes, such as heating liquids for domestic, power, or

6 warming purposes, or for purposes of evaporation.

V Vhile many attempts have been made to provide an apparatus of the character named they have been inefiicient, due to the failure of the designers thereof to recognize certain conditions which are necessary to the satisfactory utilization of such radiation. The amount of heat per unit area contained in the solar radiation is, under the best conditions,

' relatively small, and to obtain a substantial rise in temperatures from it, necessitates the use of every refinement possible to reduce radiation and convection losses, while economic reasons demand the simplest and most 2 inexpensive construction.

The apparatus herein described has been designed by me with the above points in view and my invention consists in the construction, arrangement and combination of the parts of which it is composed, as will be hereinafter more fully described and claimed.

Referring to the accompanying drawings in which corresponding parts are designated by corresponding marks of reference;-

Figure 1 is a vertical section through a device embodying my invention.

Figure 2 is a plan view of the device shown in Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a fragmental section through a boiler and connected parts shown in Figure 1.

v Figure 4 is a detail through the tubular cover.

As shown in the drawings the device includes a ray-receiver, specifically shown as a boiler which is planar, i. e., is substantially flat, and consists of two parallel sheets 1 of suitable metal, which sheets at intervals are held together by bolts 2 and spaced apart by washers 3 surrounding the bolts at a distance relatively small in respect to the lateral dimensions of the boiler. The upper edges of the sheets are formed into flanges 4 as shown in Figure 3, to which is fastened a flattened side 6 of acylindrical steam chest 6, a plate 50 5 being interposed between the flanges and the top of the steam the steam chest. The interior of the boiler is in communication with the interior of the steam chest by means of perforations (shown in dottedlines at 7 in Figure 3 in the late). The lower edges of the sheet 1 are ormed into a cylinder 8, into which passes the perforated intake pipe 9. A steam pipe 10 extends from the top of the steam chest to a suitable injector 11 attached to the water intake pipe 9 and to the water feed pipe 12.

A steam eduction pipe 13 is connected to chest.

The parts as above described are supported upon suitable frame work 14 by pillars 15 in such a manner that the plane of the boiler is approximately parallel to the earths axis and at right angles to the plane of the meridian at the point where the device isinstalled, so the rays of the sun may be normal to the upper surface of the boiler at noon on the solstices, and such upper surface of the boiler is blackened to increase the amount of heat absorbed thereby.

The boiler and connected parts as above described are contained in a suitable casing 16 to reduce radiation and convection losses, and to further aid in this the boiler has placed beloivz it and around it heat insulating packin ith the construction as heretofore described, if the boiler is exposed to the suns rays its contents will be heated, but as radiation and convection losses from the upper surface of the boiler rapidly increase as the temperature of the boiler and its contents are increased, the temperature which it is possible to obtain within the boiler will be limited. .To prevent these heat losses from the upper surface of the boiler I provide a cover for the casing 16 and for the boiler container therein, which casing is diathermous tothe rays of the sun, but which is opaque to the rays such as will be thrown back from the darkened surface of the boiler, and which will be non-conductive of heat. Forthis purpose the cover is made of a series of juxtaposed and preferably closely fitting evacuated vessels of suitable material. I have shown such vessels as glass tubes 18. These tubes are elliptical in cross section with their 00 major axes parallel with the boiler, and each tube has at each end of its major axis a longitudinal channel 19 in its surface. In t e channels 19 of adjacent tubes is placed a packing 20 which may be of tubing having a relatively thick wall. The material from which the tubes 18 are made is one highly transparent to rays of the wave lengths contained within the suns beam, but highly nontrans arent to rays emanating from a dark sur ace and as the temperature of the material of the screen will be raised'by this lack of diathermacy to the last named rays, the tubes should be of a material having high thermal endurance and low thermal expansion. The material should have also low conductivity to prevent losses by conduction within the walls of the tube from the lower wall to the upper wall, the vacuum within the tubes reduclng convection losses therein.

With a construction as hereinbefore described I have been enabled, in locations where the sun has considerable power, to raise the temperature of the contents of the boiler far above 100 C., and to trap enough heat for cooking and heating. The medium within the boiler is preferably water, but I may employ other fluids, such as ammonia, or sulphur dioxide, or for certain purposes, high test oils.

It will be noted that by makin the tubes 18 elliptical with the major axes t ereof parallel with the boiler, the screen is given a substantially fiat upper surface, and that the several tubes present to the sun surfaces which are but sli htly curved, and which therefore, when the boiler is oriented, as above described, will be disposed in a manner to result in the minimum of loss by reflection.

Having thus described my invention wlmt I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent 1s:-

1. In a device for utilizin the heat of the suns rays the combination 0 a boiler having its up r and lower surfaces formed by plates space a short distance apart, and inclined to the horizontal, means for introducing fluid along the bottom edge of the boiler, a steam chest alon the top edge of the boiler, insulation for the sides and bottom of the boiler and a tight screen transparent to the suns rays and covering the top of the boiler consistin of a series of evacuated glass tubes.

2. n a device for utilizing the heat of the suns rays the combination of a boiler having its up er and lower surfaces formed by plates spaced a short distance apart, and inclined to the horizontal, means for introducing fluid along the bottom ed e of the boiler, a steam chest alon the top e e of the boiler, insulation for t e sides and bottom of the boiler and a tight screen covering the top of the boiler consisting of a senes of evacuated gl gsess tubes, and a packing between adjacent tu 3. In a device for utilizing solar energy, the combination of a stationa ra -receiver resenting. an extended ray-Zbsor ing surace, situated approximately parallel to the earths axis and at right angles to the plane of the meridian; insulating material to reduce the loss of heat from other surfaces of said ray-receiver; and a planar screen transparent to sun rays, covering said ray-absorbing surface, comprising a p evacuated members elongated horizontally at right angles to the plane of the meridian, the screen being opaque to rays emitted from said ray-receiver to reduce loss of heat by radiation and air-convection from said rayreceiver.

In testimony whereof I hereunto afiix my signature. v

CHARLES GREELEY ABBOT.

uralit of hollow

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3985116 *Apr 22, 1974Oct 12, 1976Kaptron, Inc.High efficiency solar panel
US3985119 *Oct 1, 1975Oct 12, 1976Oakes Jr Francis WSolar heat collector
US4062350 *Jun 4, 1976Dec 13, 1977Reed Gerald CSolar water heater
US4091793 *Apr 21, 1976May 30, 1978U.S. Philips CorporationSolar collector
US4116225 *Jul 7, 1977Sep 26, 1978Corning Glass WorksSolar energy collector
US4142509 *Aug 1, 1977Mar 6, 1979U.S. Philips CorporationSolar collector comprising an evacuated cover
US4142511 *May 20, 1977Mar 6, 1979General Dynamics CorporationSolar radiation collector devices and systems
US4144875 *Apr 1, 1977Mar 20, 1979Richard BrunoSolar collector comprising an entrance window consisting of evacuated tubes
US4147156 *Mar 23, 1977Apr 3, 1979Sunworks, Inc.Solar energy collector having a convection current inhibiting member
US4159706 *Mar 14, 1977Jul 3, 1979U.S. Philips CorporationSolar collector comprising an evacuated absorber cover tube
US4173969 *Oct 28, 1977Nov 13, 1979Scholl Dr Ing GunterLight-permeable thermal insulation apparatus
US4184480 *Apr 10, 1978Jan 22, 1980Corning Glass WorksVacuum window for solar transmission
US4205660 *Mar 9, 1978Jun 3, 1980Corning Glass WorksSolar energy collector
US4210126 *Mar 9, 1978Jul 1, 1980Corning Glass WorksSolar energy collector
US4211207 *Apr 2, 1974Jul 8, 1980Stephen MolivadasHeating and cooling systems
US4224928 *Oct 19, 1977Sep 30, 1980Park Energy CompanyCover for solar heat collector
US4261334 *Jul 26, 1978Apr 14, 1981Matthews Robert DSolar collector
US4284064 *Nov 28, 1978Aug 18, 1981Midouhas Stephen CSolar heating system
US4292958 *Dec 10, 1979Oct 6, 1981H & H Tube & Mfg. Co.Solar heat absorber for solar heat collectors
US8381399Jan 5, 2010Feb 26, 2013Gregory B. MillsAdaptive re-use of waste insulated glass window units as thermal solar energy collection panels
US20060254576 *Jul 21, 2006Nov 16, 2006Jeno MartonMethod for gaining heat energy from a solar collector and heat energy absorbent substances usable in this method
US20100170092 *Jan 5, 2010Jul 8, 2010Mills Gregory BAdaptive re-use of waste insulated glass window units as thermal solar energy collection panels
DE2615475A1 *Apr 9, 1976Oct 13, 1977Philips PatentverwaltungSolar heater with glass vacuum tubes - has absorber layer between tubes and heat exchanger or inside tubes
DE2635262A1 *Aug 5, 1976Feb 9, 1978Philips PatentverwaltungSonnenkollektor mit einer evakuierten abdeckung
Classifications
U.S. Classification126/648, 126/651, 126/663
International ClassificationF24J2/04, F24J2/00, F24J2/50, F24J2/20
Cooperative ClassificationF24J2/20, Y02E10/44, F24J2/507
European ClassificationF24J2/50D, F24J2/20