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Publication numberUS1802116 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 21, 1931
Filing dateJan 31, 1930
Priority dateJan 31, 1930
Publication numberUS 1802116 A, US 1802116A, US-A-1802116, US1802116 A, US1802116A
InventorsKinsley Felix P
Original AssigneeKinsley Felix P
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Snow skate
US 1802116 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

. April 21; 1931. .F. P. KINSLEY 1,802,116

SNOW SKATE Filed Jan., 31, 1930 d y .3 i a Patented Apr. 21, 1931 Fnnrx .P. KINSLEY, on ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI snow SKATE Application filed January 31, 1930. Serial No. 424,796.

1 This invention relates to new and useful improvements in snow skates, one, of the objectsof the invention being the provision of a steel runner constructed that it can be readily attached to the foot gear of a roller skate of any well-known make.

Further objects of the invention are to provide a snow skate having a novel form of runner formed of sheet steel of substantial width and having its longitudinal edges beaded and disposed below the plane of the-main bodyof such runner, the forward end of said runner being curved upwardly.

Other objects of the invention are to provide a snow skate having a runnerof the class described andhaving its upperface' provided with upwardly presented ears or lugs arranged in pairs spaced from each other, said ears beingaperturejd and adapted to receive, and have secured thereto 'by means of suitable bolts, the depending brackets of a suitable foot'gear such as generallyused with roller skates.

Additional objects of the invention are to provide a snow skate-having arunner 7 formed of sheet steelof suitable width and having its underside formedwith a slight camber and provided with a series of longil tudinally disposed downwardly projecting ribs orbeads for engaging the snowsur face, the upperiface-of said-runnerbeing pro- 'vided with two pairs of spaced upwardly projectinglugs or ears, each of which has arseries of apertures and adaptedtohave secured thereto, by;means of suitablebolts, thedependingbrackets of a suitable footgear, the plurality of apertures permitting adjustment of the foot "gear longitudinally relatively to the snow skate;

With these and other objects in View, my invention consists in certain novel features of construction and arrangement of parts, hereinafter more fully described and claimed, and illustrated in, the. accompanying drawings, in which V Figure 1v is a side-elevational view of my snow skate. I ie e2 s s iz n a ress section taken 1 sal ne 2e2.-o ;.l isurel i Figure 3 is a front elevational view of the runner member. 1

Figure 4. 1s an enlarged cross section taken on line 4 4; of Figure 1 and showing the attaching bracket of the foot gear in dotted lines. 7

Figure 5 is a transverse cross section through a modified form of my snow skate. Rollerskates have their rollers journalled in suitable depending brackets by means of bolts which are mounted in the horizontally andtransversely disposed seats formed in said brackets. These bolts are detachable in order to permit replacement of the rollers.

It is the purpose of my invention to permit the use of this foot gear in conjunction with my improved runner by the removal of said rollers and their corresponding bolts and bolting tothe depending brackets of thefoot gear the ears or lugs extending upwardly from the runner.

Referring by numerals to the accompanying drawings, 10 indicates a foot gear of a roller skate which may be of any standard construction.

Depending from this foot gear'is a pair of brackets 11, each of which terminates in a horizontally and transversely disposed'tubular member 12 having a seat l3'for the reception of suitable bolts. A runner lt is formed of sheet steel and is of suitable width I so as to extend a suitable distance on each side of bracketsll. This runner is given a slight camber so that it curves upwardly at both ends as clearly shown in Figure 1. V

The forward end of the runner is extended upwardly and is slightly pointed as indicated at 15. The rear end. of the runner is slightly upturned as indicated at 16.. The edges of the runner are turned downwardly and then upwardly to provide longitudinally disposed vdownwardly presentedbeads 17 which extend below the plane of the main body portion and are normally in supporting contactwith the snow surface, thereby 1 reducing friction and reinforcing the runner.

A pair of brackets :18 is attachedto the upper face of the runner at spaced points and eachbracket is provided with a pair of The lugs of each bracket are provided with a series of apertures 20, the apertures of the res ective ears being aligned with each other an are adapted to receive bolts 21 which extend transversely of the brackets and have their threaded ends adapted to receive nuts 22. Lugs 19 are spaced from each other a suitable distance so as to receive therebetween the tubular members 12 of brackets 11. Bolts 21, when seated in the respective apertures, pass through the seats 18 and thus secure the foot gear 10 and runner 14 in assembled relation.

The arrangement of spaced apertures 20 permits the adjustment of the foot gear 10 longitudinally relatively to the runner.

Brackets 18 may be either riveted to the runner 14 as indicated at 24, or may be secured in any other suitable manner, such as spot-welding.

These brackets are spaced from each other so as to accommodate the roller bearing lugs of the standard make roller skates and as each bracket has its ears provided with a plurality of spaced apertures, the foot gear can be adjusted longitudinally to fit different sized shoes, and the runner secured thereto by means of the appropriate apertures.

The turned or beaded edges are disposed downwardly below the plane of the main body portion of the runner and form the supporting surfaces for the runner, thereby reducing friction and increasing the ease with which the runner may be operated over the snow surface. Furthermore, said beaded edges reinforce the runner. This runner may be further reinforced by one or more ribs 25 which extend longitudinally of the runner and are presented downwardly.

The runner can be furnished either separately from the foot gear, in which case the rollers are detached from the ordinary roller skates and the runner attached thereto, or the snow skate can be sold complete with the foot gear attached, in which instance the foot gear of the standard make roller skates can be used minus the rollers.

In the modified form shown in Figure 5, the longitudinal side beads 26 are formed by bending the sides of the body member downwardly and then upwardly and inwardly over the upper face of said member as indicated at 27. These edge portions are provided with extensions which are bent upwardly at right angles to said body portion to form the lugs 19. In this form the brackets are formed integral with the runner and no spot-welding or riveting is required.

The skates can be used either on snow or ice. In using the skates on snow the entire surface of the runner is used, the central rib 25 forming a guide and maintains the skates on their true course. In using the skates on ice or frozen snow, only the beaded edges rest on the hard surface.

My improved skate can be economically manufactured and as no special foot gear is required, the cost thereof is not very great. By enabling the use of foot gear of roller skates, during the season when roller skates cannot be used, a double advantage is thus ained.

While I have shown and described the preferred forms of my invention, it is obvious that various other changes in the con struction and arrangement of parts of my improved skate can be made and substituted for those herein shown without departing from the spirit of my invention.

I claim:

1. A snow skate of the class described comprising in combination a roller skate foot gear including depending lugs from which rollers have been removed, a single piece runner of a greater length and width than said foot gear, brackets extending upwardly from said runner near each end thereof, each bracket comprising a pair of transversely spaced ears arranged on the opposite sides of the respective lugs, and means for securing said brackets to said lugs and attaching said runner to said foot gear.

2. A snow skate of the class described comprising in combination a roller skate foot gear including depending lugs from which rollers have been removed, a runner of sheet metal and of substantial width and provided with a centrally and longitudinally disposed rib and headed edges extending below the plane of the body portion of said runner, brackets extending upwardly from said runner, each bracket comprising a pair of ears spaced transversely for engaging the opposite sides of the respective lugs, and means for attaching said brackets to the lugs of said foot gear.

3. A snow skate of the class described comprising in combination a roller skate foot gear including depending lugs from which rollers have been removed, a runner of sheet metal and of substantial width, the longitudinal edges of which are formed with downwardly presented beads, said runner being formed with a slight camber and a centrally and longitudinally disposed rib, and means for detachably securing said runner to the lugs of said foot gear.

4. In a device of the class described, a runner for snow skates comprising an elongated member of sheet steel of substantial width, said runner being formed with a slight camber and having its forward end curved upwardly, the underside of said member being provided with a centrally and longitudinally disposed rib, and a plurality of brackets secured to and extending upwardly from said member, each bracket comprising a pair of ears spaced transversely of said runner, the upper ends of the ears of each bracket being formed with aligned apertures adapted to co-register with apertured lugs of a suitable footgear and be detachably secured thereto.

5. A runner for snow skates comprising a sheet metal member of substantial width having its longitudinal edges turned downwardly andinwardly to provide longitudinal beads disposed below the plane of the body portion of said member, said member having a slight camber and having its forward end curved upwardly, and apertured lugs pro-v jecting upwardly from said member and adapted to have secured thereto a suitable foot gear.

6. A skate of the class described comprising in combination a roller skate foot 7 gear including depending lugs normally carrying rollers; a runner provided with a longitudinally and centrally disposed rib having a slight camber, ears extending upwardly from said runner, each ear having a plurality of apertures spaced longitudinally whereby said foot gear can be adjusted longitudinally relatively to said runner, and bolts for detachably engaging said lugs to the respective ears.

7. A skate of the class described comprising in combination a roller skate foot gear including depending lugs from which rollers have been removed, a runner of sheet metal and provided with a plurality of downwardly presented longitudinally disposed ribs, a plurality of ears arranged in pairs and extending upwardly from said runner, the lugs of each pair being provided with a plurality of apertures spaced longitudinally, and detachable means for attaching said lugs to the respective pair of ears, said plurality of apertures permitting longitudinal adjustment of said foot gear relatively to said runner.

In testimony whereof I hereunto afiix my signature this 21st day of January, 1930.

FELIX P. KINSLEY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2454321 *Jun 9, 1945Nov 23, 1948Howard Jack WConvertible skate
US2469798 *Nov 28, 1944May 10, 1949Gottlieb TrachslinIce and snow skate
US2548391 *Aug 7, 1948Apr 10, 1951Petrime Joseph KConvertible skate
US2614858 *Apr 17, 1948Oct 21, 1952Tey Mfg CorpSki binding
US3802714 *Jan 6, 1972Apr 9, 1974S FreegardRiding deck for a monoski
US3990713 *Sep 2, 1975Nov 9, 1976Hokanson Jack WProtective plate for a skateboard
US4116455 *Mar 7, 1977Sep 26, 1978Dotson Donald RSkateboard ski
US4138128 *Feb 10, 1977Feb 6, 1979Criss William HSki board
US4161323 *Oct 3, 1977Jul 17, 1979Wetteland Maxwell TSnow ski board apparatus
US4163565 *Jul 27, 1977Aug 7, 1979Weber Robert CSnow ski apparatus and method of making it
US5531462 *Mar 27, 1995Jul 2, 1996Gu; Show M.Skate combination
US5720120 *Aug 31, 1994Feb 24, 1998Smith; PeterSnow shoe
US6595541 *Jan 29, 2002Jul 22, 2003Marcus KuchlerShort ski
US6773021 *Nov 8, 2001Aug 10, 2004The Burton CorporationSliding device
US7510206May 12, 2003Mar 31, 2009Walker Curtis GSnow skates
WO2010149122A1 *Nov 18, 2009Dec 29, 2010Helmut EichnerSnow and ice glider for reversible arrangement on a shoe having at least two guide rails
Classifications
U.S. Classification280/7.13, 280/600
International ClassificationA63C1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63C1/00
European ClassificationA63C1/00