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Publication numberUS1803305 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 28, 1931
Filing dateJun 22, 1928
Priority dateJun 22, 1928
Publication numberUS 1803305 A, US 1803305A, US-A-1803305, US1803305 A, US1803305A
InventorsJoseph H Sheard
Original AssigneeDavid Luptons Sons Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Awning
US 1803305 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J H. SH EARD April z3, 1931.

AWNING Filed June 22, 1928 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Fjmlam J. H. sHEARb April 2s, 1931.

AWNING Filed June 22, 1928 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR- eoslvz H Skeara WW ATTORNEYS.

Patented Apr. 28, 1931 A UNITEDSTATES PAT-ENT oFFIcE- V Joslin:` II'.y SHEARD, or ISHILADELIIIIA, PENNsYILvANIA, ,AssIGNon rro DAVID LUProNs soNs coMIANY, or PHILADELPHIA, rENNsYDvANIA, A coRronA'rIoN c 0F PENNSYLVANIA A'WNING Y `Application le'd June 22,

V "ture,.the necessarymeans for attachingv the awning.

In general,I aim to afford anawning of simpleandinexpensive construction, capable of ready and easyhanging and' dismantling without requiring special tools, that is sturdy and vsecure against rattling and displacement under wind' pressure when in lowered position; which, moreover, is wholly collapsible for protection within the contines of th associated opening when not in use.

In the drawings,jFig. Iy is a perspective view` showing i a vertical -sectional view through a metallic Window structure suitably modified in accordance with this invention for attachment of my novel awning.VV

Fig. II is a fragmentary perspective view showing in` detail the means employed in securing the covering of the awning along Aitsfupper edge tothe head rail of the Window l5 `frame.

i Fig.`III isan inverted perspective view of one of the parts shown in Fig. II. Fig. IV is a fragmentary perspective view showing oneV of the pivot brackets for the n bracing frames of the awning. f

Figs. V and VI are, respectively, a plan andV side elevation showing a cleat for the awning operating' cord or rope and the manner in which the same is attached. 5 Figs. VII andLVIII are, respectively, front and side elevations of a hook and its fastening means whereby the awning is secured against rattling and displacement under wind pressure when in lowered position.

57 With reference first more particularly to 192s.V serial No. 287,381.'

Fig. I of these illustrations, the window structure there delineated comprises Va fixed frame 10 whichis set into theo-pening llprovided for it in the masonry 12 of the building, after a manner commonly 'practiced in this art.

The frame 10 has atop or head rail 13, as well,` as bottom and side jamb rails 14,' 15, respec-l tively, inthe present instance, all of metallic angular cross section. Secured in the upper part of the frame 10 is a xe'd window light 16,` while theV lower part is occupied by a glazed sash 17 ywhich may be pivoted to swing open' on either a horizontall or vertical axis, not illustrated. The sash 17 is also vconstructed with metallic perimetric rail bars of angular cross section which close weather tight all around, against the rails 14, 15 of the fixed frame 10, as well as against an intermediateor cross rail 18 of the latter.

The head rail 13 of the ixedframe 1.0 has a frontal projection 2O adapted to extend somewhat beyond the masonry 12, as shown in Fig. 1I, forservice as va weathering or rain drip. This projection may be integrally formed with the rail 13, or, as herein shown,v`

made as a separate ieceffashioned from sheet metal with an angu ar bend at 21 (see Fig. II)

to fit the cross section of saidra'll'; and permanently secured in place incidental to manufacture of the window -frame 10, either by riveting or welding, as found most expedient in practice. Referring again toFig. II, it will be observed that thefprojection 2O affords along its under side, in conjunction witha separately attached longitudinally extending strip 22, a co-extensive counter-recessed slot 23 with a lateral cutout 2&1, see Fig. III, for a purpose which will be present-ly explained.

With reference now to the awning which is comprehensively designated by the numeral 25 'in Fig. I, it willbe observed'that the same comprises a covering 26, which, along its upperedge is pierced and grommeted atintervals, as at 27 in Fig. II, for passage of securing means in the form lof screws 28 with heads 29. In` attaching the awning to the,

erly allocated positions along the slot 23. Wing nuts 30 are subsequently applied to the screws 28 to clamp the latter to the head rail projection 20 with the upper edge of the awning covering 26 interposed. The covering 26 is otherwise supported by bottom and intermediate bracing frames 31, 32, which are both fashioned to U-shape configuration from stout wire or rod stock. The side arms of these frames 31, 32 are flattened at their ends and pierced, as shown in Fig. IV, for pivotal attachment to brackets 33 whereof one is shown in detail in the latter ligure and also indicated in Fig. I. These brackets 33 are preferably made as castings with rearwardly extending tongues 33a adapted to be permanently attached to each of the side verticals or jambs 15 of the fixed window frame 10 by riveting or welding, also incidental to initial manufacture of said trame. The projecting portions of the brackets 33 are clevised as at 33?) to receive the fiattened ends of the side arms of the frames 31, 32, pivotal attachment being effected by means of screws 34, 35, see Fig. IV. It is to be particularly noted that the pivot centers 34, 35 lie in diii'erent planes so that interference is avoided between the frames 31, 32 as the awning 25 is collapsed or folded.

To insure the frames 31, 32 against rattling and also to rmly hold the awning 25 as a whole against displacement under wind pressure, when lowered, I provide angular struts having, as shown in Figs. I, VII and VIII,

`the form of hooks 36, one such hook being associated with each side arm of the frame 31. These hooks 36 are attached, at intermediate points to the side arms of the frame 31, by means of two piece clips 37 with capacity for free swinging movement about spacing collars 38 associated with screw bolts 39 by which said clips are clamped in position. For cooperation with the hooks 36 the side jamb rails 15 of the fixed window frame 10 are provided, at a level below the brackets 33, with permanently attached eyes 40, see Fig. I. Y

The operating means for the awning 25 may include a cord or rope 40 guided over suitable pulleys (not shown) and secured at the ends to the lower bracing frame 31 of said awning. For convenience in anchoring the cord or rope 41, I attach to one oi the side arms of the frame 32 a cleat, such as shown at 42 in Fig. I and detailed on a larger scale in F igs. V and VI. The cleat 42 is secured to the side arm of the frame 32 by a two piece clip 43-similar to the clips 37 aforedescribed-which is clamped in position by screws 44 with associate spacing collars 45, in a manner obvious from the illustration. To raise the awning 25 the hooks 36 are iirst disengaged from the eyes 40, and the frames 31, 32 swung upward by pulling on the rope or cord 41 until said frames assume an upright position. It is noteworthy in this connection from Fig. I that the pivot centers for the frames 31, 32 are well within the` window opening 11 whereby the awning 25, when raised is wholly protected within said opening to the avoidance of any projecting parts beyond the wall surface of the building 12. By attaching the cleat 42 to the awning 25 instead of the window frame 10, it will be apparent that I avoid an unnecessary and unsightly projection or obstruction on the window during the seasons of the year when the said awning is removed. Of those parts which do remain on the window, the brackets 33 and the screw eyes 4() are small and inconspicuous, while the projection 20 of the head rail 13 is of use in that it functions as a weathering or rain drip.

I have thus provided a very simple and eliicient awning wholly attached to metal window frames with provisions which per mit ready mounting and dismantling as required in accordance with the changing seasons ot the year, such mounting and dismantling being eiiected without necessitating employment of skilled mechanics nor use of special tools.

I-Iaving thus described my invention, I claim:

1. In an awning for metal frame structures ot the type described, a plurality of swingable brace members to support the shelter covering with pierced ends, and brackets having pivots for attachment of the pierced ends, said bracket pivots'being allocated to different planes and also embodying rearward extensions for connection to opposing jamb rails ot the frame structure whereby the awning, as a whole, may be collapsed within the confines of the frame structure opening.

2. In an awning for metal frame structures of the type described, a plurality of swingable brace members to support the shelter covering with pierced ends, brackets having pivots for attachment of the pierced ends, operating means including a cord, and a cleat for the same secured to one of the brace members, said bracket pivots being allocated to different planes and also embodying rearward extensions for connection to opposing jamb rails of the frame structure whereby the awning, as a whole, may be collapsed within the conlines of the frame structure opening.

3. In an awning for metal frame structures of the type described, a plurality of swingable brace members to support the shelter covering with pierced ends, brackets having pivots for attachment of the pierced ends, operating means including a cord, and a. cleat for the same secured to one of the brace members, in combination with angular struts pivotally secured at intermediate points to the side arms of another of the brace members for engagement with means on the side j ambs at .a level below the brackets aforesaid, and said bracket pivots bein allocated to different planes and also em odying rearward extensions for connection to opposing jamb rails 0f the frame structure whereby the awning as a whole, may be collapsed within the confines of the 'frame structure opening.

4. A pivot bracket in accordance with any one of the preceding claims embodying a clevised portion having pivot centers in different planes to receive the brace member ends, and a rearwardly extending tongue appropriately conflgured for permanent attachment to the side j ambs of the frame structure.

A In testimony whereof, I have hereuto signed my name at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, this 12th day of June, 1928.

, JOSEPH H. VSI-IEARD.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2781834 *Jun 21, 1954Feb 19, 1957Woodard Roy SAwning
US6598612Nov 21, 2000Jul 29, 2003James R. CroweMethod and apparatus for imparting a mansard shape to an awning
Classifications
U.S. Classification160/56, 160/65, 160/DIG.500, 160/390
International ClassificationE04F10/04
Cooperative ClassificationY10S160/05, E04F10/04
European ClassificationE04F10/04