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Publication numberUS1805781 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 19, 1931
Filing dateJun 14, 1928
Priority dateJun 14, 1928
Publication numberUS 1805781 A, US 1805781A, US-A-1805781, US1805781 A, US1805781A
InventorsMoreton Henry H
Original AssigneeMoreton Henry H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gas heater
US 1805781 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 19, 1931. H. H. MORETON GAS HEATER Filed June 14, 1928 gmnmtoz Q %N H a Q 3 iiwflimxuzms w IQN w W Patented May 19, 1931 r P TENT j o- FICE HENRY H. MORETON, OF SANTA MONIGA, CALIFORNIA ens HEATER Application filed June 14, 1928. Serial No. 285,479.

This invention is a heater of the type in which a gas flame is utilized as the initial source o fheat.

One of the objects of the invention is to provide a heater equipped with agas burner located as nearly as may be at the focal position with respect to a circular'concaved reflector, so that a highly eflicient dispersion of heat rays will be obtained by means of n uniform reflection of rays. A further object is to provide a gas heater of the charactor mentioned having means for magnifying or increasing the heat producing capacity of the gas flame which would normally be produced by a gas burner. A further object is to provide simple means for eiiiciently supporting the parts in position, so that they 2 may be readily assembled or dismantled as occasion may require. A further object is 20 to provide means. by which the'parts may be adjusted to insure a proper combustible mix-' ture so as to compensate for varying cond1- tions due to changes in the quality of gas being consumed. I Y I The, invention will be hereinafter fully set forth and particularly pointed out in the claims:}

In theaccomp'anying drawings I Figure 1 is a longitudinal sectional view of a heater constructed in accordance with the invention. Figure 2 is an enlarged detail View illustrating the burner section and the burner jet in assemble'd relation. Figure 3 burner-tip retaining cap. Figure 4 is a front view illustrating the burner tip. 7

Referring to the drawings, 10 designates a concavo-convex reflector'constructed of any suitable material, and provided with a 40 central opening 11. Secured to the outer face of said reflector, near one edge is alug 12,- which is-pivotally mounted between ears 13, projecting upwardly from abase- 14-.

.13 designates a burner section .which' is 4 constructed of a tubular discharge member is an enlarged detail view illustrating the 15 and an externally threaded tubular stem 16 of reduced diameter. The front end of the stem 16 removably engages the contiguous threaded end of the larger section 15, so as to provide an annular shoulder 17 Said tubular stem 16 is also provided near its inlet end -with air inlet slots 18. The tubular stem 16 is also provided with an internal screw thread tobe removably engaged with a 7 corresponding externally threaded portion'of a jet member 19, which is provided with a cook 20 by means of which the flow of gas through the jet and the burner section may be controlled. The inlet end of said jet member 19 is connected in suitable manner with a gas sired construction; v

The burner section is secured in position bypassing the tubular stem 16 rearwardly through the hole 11, fromthe front of the reflector, until the shoulder 17 abuts against the reflector. A nut 22, working on the supply tube 21 of any destem 16 is then screwed up so as to firmly clamp the reflector 10 between it and the said shoulder 17 By this arrangement, the burner section is rigidlyheld in'position, and may be quickly removed if necessary.

An; air supply chamber is provided by means of a cap 23, having an opening through which thetubular stem 16 is eX- tended, and said cap is held in position with its edge abutting against the back of the reflector, by meansof a nut 24, as clearly shownin Figure 1. Saidcap is provided with air inlet openings 25.

The burner tip consists of a disk 26'of re? fractory material, provided with a plurality of perforations through which the combustible mixtureis discharged so as to be ignited. Said disk is retainedin position by means of a sleeve 27 which extends over and enretain the disk in place. vided with a lug 29.

Enclosing the cap 26 and the contiguous portions of the burner section is a heat intensifying member H, consisting of a body of refractory material provided with a cylindrical hub-like portion 80, and a conical portion 31 flaring outwardly from said sleeve portion. Said conical body is provided with perforations 32 of varying sizes, the perforations in the lower portion thereof being larger than those in the upper portion. Said intensifier is retained in position by sliding the hub 30 over the sleeve 27, and in order to prevent rotation thereof, the hub 30 is provided with a longitudinal groove to engage the lug 29. V

In practice, the burner section B, the cap 23 and the burner et are assembled and secured in position upon the reflector in the manner already described, and the heat intensifler H is then secured in position. hen it is desired to utilize the heater, the cock 20 is opened and gas from asuitable Said cap is prosource of supply enters the burner section through the jet 19 and tube 15 and the section 16, air entering said tube 15 through the slots 18, reaching said slots from the outside atmosphere through the openings 25. It is to be understood, of course, that the relative position of the jet 19 with respect to the burner tip 26 has first been adjusted to produce the proper mixture and flow of gas suitable to the particular gas supply being drawn upon. ture is discharged through the perforations in the disk 26, it passes out of the perforations 32 in the heat intensifier and may be readily ignited. The combustion of the mixture at the burner jet 28 raises the temperature of the intensifier H and in a very short time said intensifier is heated to incandescence and the heat rays emanating therefrom will impinge against the reflector 10, and by reason of the shape of the latter will be directed forwardly into the space to be heated. By making the openings 32 larger in the lower part of the intensifier and smaller in the upper part, a freer outlet for the burned gases is provided at the lower portion of the burner than at the upper portion thereof and the distribution of the heat around, and through the refractory material ofthe intensifier is rendered more uniform and efficient. It will be noted that the enlarged portion 31 of the intensifier H extends approximately to the plane of the peripheral edge of the reflector, so that the intense heat produced thereby will not in any way injure the material of which-the reflector is constructed.

The advantages of the invention will be readily understood by those skilled in the art to which it belongs. For instance, a very important advantage is that the refractory As the combustible mlxheat intensifier is positioned as nearly as possible at the focal point of the reflector, and the heat produced by the incandescence of said jacket is therefore uniformly distributed and projected into the space to be heated. By enclosing the burner tip within a refractory jacket, the efficiency of the burner is greatly increased because the normal heat-producing capacity of the gas flame is greatly magnified by the incandescence of the refractory material. Another important advantage is that the burner tube, burner jet and burnertip are all so related and constructed that they may be readily assembled or dismantled as occasion may require, and they may also be quickly secured to or detached from the reflector.

Having thus explained the nature of the invention and described an operative manner of constructing and using the same, although without attempting to set forth all of the forms in which it may be made, or all of the forms of its use, what is claimed 1. A gas heater of the character described comprising a circular reflector, an axially disposed burner section supported by said reflector and having a portion extended rearwardly through the reflector, a perforated burner disk closing the discharge end of said burner section, a retainer sleeve engaging said disk and said burner section so as to hold the disk in place, and a perforated casing of refractory material enclosing said sleeve and the discharge end of said burner section, so that combustion will take place within and around said casing.

2. A gas heater of the character described comprising a circular reflector, an axially disposed burner section supported by said reflector and having a portion extended rearwardly through the reflector, a perforated burner disk closing the discharge end of said burner section, means for retaining said disk in position, a casing of refractory material enclosing the discharge end of said burner section, said casing hav ing perforations of graduated sizes. formed therein, the perforations at the bottom portion being larger than those at the upper portion, and means for preventing rotation of said casing.

8. A gas heater of the character described comprising a circular reflector, an axially disposed burner section supported by said reflector and having a portion extended rearwardly through the reflector, a perforated burner disk closing the discharge end of the burner section, a retainer sleeve for said disk engaging said disk and the contiguous portion of the burner section, said sleeve being provided with a peripheral lug, and a casing of refractory material having a hub enclosing said sleeve so that combustion will take place within and around groove complemental to said lug to prevent said casing, said. hub having an internal rotation of said casing, the wall of said casing having perforations therein of graduated sizes, the perforations in the lower portion being larger than those in the upper portion thereof. 7

l. A gas heater of the character described comprising a circular reflector, an axially disposed burner section having a'stem of reduced diameter, so as to provide an annular shoulder, said stem being extended rearwardly through the wall of the reflector, means on said stem cooperatingjwith said shoulder to clamp the burner section to said reflector, a burner tip closing the discharge end of said burner section, and means for supplying combustible mixture to said burner section.

5. A gas heater of the character described comprising a circular reflector, an axially disposed burner section having a stem of reduced diameter, so as to provide an annular shoulder, said stem being extended rear- Wardly through the wall of the reflector and provided near its inlet end with air inlet slots, means on the stem cooperating with said shoulder to clamp the burner section to the reflector, a burner tip closing the discharge end of the burner section, and a burner jet connected with the inlet end of said stem.

6. A gas heater of the character described comprising a circular reflector, an axially disposed burner section having a portion extended rearwardly through the wall of the reflector and provided with air inlet slots therein, means for clamping the burner secstem extended rearwardly through the Wall of the reflector, means cooperating with said stem to clamp the burner section to said reflector, a cap having an opening through which said stem extends, and a nut working on said stem and engaging said cap to maintain the edge thereof in contact with the reflector, so as to form an air chamber, the wall of said cap being provided with air inlet openings. H

8. A gas heater of the character described comprising a circular reflector, an axially disposed burner section having a stem extended rearwardly through the wall of the reflector, the inlet end of said stem being internally threaded, said stem being also slotted near the said inlet end, means cooperating with said stem for clamping the burner section to the reflector, and an externally threaded burner jet adjustably en-' gaging the internally threaded portion of saidstem and having means to engage a gas supply conduit.

' 9. A gas heater of the character described comprising a circular reflector, an axially disposed burner section having a stem of re.- duced diameter so as to provide an annular shoulder, said stem being externally thread ed and extended rearwardly through the Wall of the reflector, a nut working on said stem and cooperating with said shoulder to clamp the burner section to the reflector, a perforated cap having an opening through which said stem extends, and a second nut working on said stem and engaging said cap so as to maintain the edge thereof in contact with the reflector to form an air chamber.

10. A gas heater of the character described comprising a circular reflector, an axially disposed burner section having a stern extended rearwardly through the wall of the reflector, means cooperating with the stem to clamp the burner section to the reflector, a burner tip closing the discharge end of said burner section, means for supplying combustible mixture to said burner section, and heat intensifying means located at the focal position of the reflector and enclosing the discharge end of the burner section.

11. In a heater, a concave reflector, a Bunsen burner carried thereby, and a radiant telescopically arranged on and supported wholly by the Bunsen burner, said radiant I having a neck portion to fit the Bunsen burner and an enlarged portionto be arranged beyond said burner, said enlarged portion being formed in its upper part and lower part with openings, the openings of the lower part being larger than the openings of the upper part. 7

12. In a heater,,a concave reflector, a Bunsen burner carried thereby, a radiant telescopically arranged on and supported wholly by the Bunsen burner, said radiant having a neck portion to fit the Bunsen burner and an enlarged portion tobe arranged beyondv said burner, said enlarged portion being formed in its upper part and. lower part with openings',,the openings of the lower 1 part being larger than the openings of the upper part, and means whereby to determine the position of the radiant with re v spect to the burner to insure proper relative'positions of said openings. A

18. In a heater, a concave reflector, a gas burner including a sleeve member removably secured to the reflector, a gas distributor arranged in such sleeve member, a refractory disk at the flame end of the sleeve, a connector engaging the sleeve and holding the disk in place, a refractory element 1m: ing a portion to slidably embrace the sleeve and aportion to surround the flame end of the burner, the latter portion of such element constituting the combustion end of the heater and being formed with openings 14, In a heater, a concave parabolic reflector, a Bunsen burner connected thereto, and a radiant supported by the Bunsen burner, said radiant having a neck portion and an enlarged portion, the extremity of the enlarged portion of the radiant being so positioned as to extend approximately to the plane of the edge o1 the parabolic 1 eflector.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand.

HENRY H. MORETON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2539512 *Nov 15, 1946Jan 30, 1951Charles Herbert WilliamTubular gas burner with attached reflector
US3934572 *Apr 2, 1973Jan 27, 1976Teague Jr Walter DorwinInfrared space heater
Classifications
U.S. Classification126/92.00B, 126/86
International ClassificationF24C3/04, F24C3/00
Cooperative ClassificationF24C3/042
European ClassificationF24C3/04A