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Publication numberUS1806581 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 26, 1931
Filing dateAug 29, 1928
Publication numberUS 1806581 A, US 1806581A, US-A-1806581, US1806581 A, US1806581A
InventorsJoseph Bethenod
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
of paris
US 1806581 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 26, 1931. J. BETHENOD 1,806,531

FUEL SUPPLY SX STEM FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES 0F VARIABLE LOAD FOR USING HEAVY FUELS Filed Aug. 29, 1928 Patented May 26, 1931 V I FUNITED STA TES . i JOSEPH BETHENOD, OF PARIS, FRANCE, ASSIGNOR TO SOCIETE DES MOTE'URS D'UGELAY, I

F PARIS, FRANCE, A LIMITED COMTEANY OF I 1' J i FUEL]; SUPPLY SYSTEM FOR INTER/NW COMBUSTION ENGINES OF VARIABLE LOAD FOR Usme HEAVY FUELS Application filed August 29, 1928, Serial No, 302,808, and in Belgium September 27, 1927.

The usual spray-carburetor as at present known in various forms, generally produces a sufliciently satisfactory fuel supply for in ternal combustion engines, provided that the 5 fuel is very volatile.

ordinary type, that is without using the wellknown expedients applied to engines of Diesel or semi-Diesel types.

A preferred embodiment of my invention is described in the following specification and shown in the accompanying drawing which shows the invention diagrammatically.

The intake manifold of the engine which is assumed to be of normal type, is supplied with air by means of an opening 4 which is controlled at will by a valve?) of any familiar type. Situated at a convenient point on the manifold 2 which is-beyond the said valve, in thesense of the flow of air, is the outlet of an auxiliary pipe 12through which is de livered' the explosive mixture of gases. qTh'ese gases are delivered in a mixture having proper proportion of each for any load, by means of the following expedient:

The engine 1 drives synchronously a volu metric pump 9 of any type, such as plunger pump, bucket-wheel pump, or radial vanewheel pump, which volumetric pump sucks per second a weight of air proportional to the weight of air flowing through the-valve 3 during the same time, in consequence of the suction produced by the engine. The volu metric pump draws in a constant volume per stroke, that is,its capacity is proportional to its speed. Moreover, it will be easily seen that this proportion can be obtained at any load, by use oficonvenient arrangement and dimensions of the admission opening 4 of the intake manifold and of the admission open ing 5 of the first auxiliary pump, this latter 'being moreover provided with a valve 6 mechanically connected with valve 3 by a rod or similar element 14:. In this way, whatever is the opening of this latter valve 6, the desired proportional relation is obtained for 9.: any speed of the engine. The intake pipe 5 submerged nozzle type. Itis thus possible to obtain at the outlet of the pump a very rich mixture, of exactly correct proportions in weight at any load, with respect to the air directly drawn in by the engine through the opening controlled by the valve 3. This very I rich mixture is delivered into an intermediate tank or reservoir 10 in communication with a second auxlhary pump 8, the dimensions of which are such as to produce a vacuum of appreciable value in said reservoir 10, that is, a pressure appreciably less than atmospheric pressure, in spite of the admission of said mixture. The mixture delivered into the reservoir 10 is vaporized because of the vacuum in the reservoir, and the gaseous mixture so produced is finally delivered into an auxiliary pipe 12 connecting the outlet of the second a pump 8 to a convenient point on the intake manifold of the engine. The second auxiliary pump 8 discharges through the pipe 12 at a pressure which is ordinarily a little less than atmospheric pressure, and is approximately the same as or slightly greater than the pressure at a given time in the intake manifold, at the point where delivery pipe 12 terminates.

The engine then draws in a mixture of air and of combustible gases correctly proport ioned at any load, and'means can be provided in order to accelerate the mixing and secure a perfect homogeneity of said mixture. In order to'besure that all the combustible liquid delivered by the nozzle of the carburetor, is driven towards the first auxiliary pump, it ispossible to use a carburetor of the vertical type, in which the direction of circulation of gases is directed from top to bottom, that is to say ina reversed sen e with respectto the direction generally em-' ployed. Further it is possible also to keep the normal direction and to place under the carburetor a cup, in order to collect the undelivered liquid, this latter being driven back to the first pump 9 by the use of any con venient device for this purpose, such as a small pump. In any case, a supplementary nozzle device can be added to the outlet of the first pump in order to make easier the formation of vapors in the intermediate tank or reservoir; it is also possible toprovide as additional means, cooling devices, or even catalyzers, as is well known in the art. Further, it is intended that the admission of explosive mixtures in the cylinders 'of the engine can be secured by valves which are separate from the valves drawing in the air necessary for creating the explosive mixture.

The second auxiliary pump 8 whichproduces the incomplete vacuum which is necessary for the production of the gaseous mix-.

ture, can be of any desired type, rotary or otherwise, and can be driven either b the engine or by any other means. While have shown in the drawing the second auxiliary pump 8 on the same shaft as the first auxiliary pump 9, it is to be understood that a geared connection of shafts may be employed to obtain proper speed at desired points.

The intake 4 has for its purpose to furnish to the motor almost all of the air necessary for combustion, while the intake 5 furnishes only a very small quantity ofair, just,

' whatis necessary for picking u the liquid comingfifrom the carburetor 7 w ich process of pie ng up yields a very rich mixture. It would not be desirable that all the air necessary for the combustion should enter through the intake 5, for the dimensions of pumps 8 and 9 would then be considerably increased, and further the passage of so' great a quantity of air would be very detrimental for vaporization in the vacuum within the chamber 10. Chamber 10 receives only the liquid to be vaporized accompanied by a quantity of air which is as small as possible.

The purpose of volumetric pump 9 is 'to maintain for every position of control lever/ 15 the correct proportion between the pure air introduced at 4, and the gas or vapor delivered through pipe 12. That is, if volumetric pump 9 were omitted and it were attempted to control admission through orifice 5 by throttle 6 alone, it would not be possible to couple regulating valves 3 and 6 by link l lland secure proper operation with automatic cooperative adjustment of the valves," and for each new position of regulating valve 3 it would be necessary to find manuall by trialand error the correct position of the regulating valve 6 which would greatly increase the difiiculty of operation of the motor. I a

iliary pump.

To secure improved operation it may be found desirable to employ a reheating element 11 surrounding the reservoir 10, and another reheating element 13 surrounding the delivery pipe 12. Such reheating elements are well known in the art, and may be of any familiar type, such as water-filled or filled with hot gas. These ma be jackets filled with water or hot gases. uch reheating at reduced pressure will materially facilitate vaporization.

The supply system here described makes it possible to use heavy fuels with an ordinary carburetor such as a spray carburetor W1l0h procedure would not otherwise be possi le.

The arrangement of the reservoir 10 between the two pumps 8 and 9 in series, makes possible the adjustment of the mixture in the reservoir as a function of the load on the motor.. l 1

While I have described a preferred embodiment of my invention, I desire that it be understood that modifications may be made and that no limitations upon my invention are intended other than are proposed by the scope of the appended claims.

What I claim as new anddesire to secure byLetters Patent of the United States is as follows: A 1. In a system for supplying fuel and air for internal combustion engines using heavy fuels, in combination, a carburetor to which liquid fuel is delivered, a main intake manifold, an auxiliary intake, a first auxiliary volumetric pump driven synchronously by the engine, a reservoir, a second auxiliary pump, said auxiliary intake, carburetor, first auxiliary pump, reservoir, andsecond auxiliary pump, being arranged in the order stated with reference to the direction of flow of the gases, to constitute'a means for delivering explosive mixtures to a'suitable point in said intake manifold.

. 2. In a system for supplying fuel and air for internal combustion engines using heavy fuels, in combination, a carburetor to which liquid fuel is delivered, a main intake manifold, an auxiliary intake, a first auxiliary volumetric pump driven synchronously by the motor, a reservoir, a second auxiliary pump, said auxiliary intake, carburetor, first auxiliary pump, reservoir, second auxiliary pum being arranged in the order stated with re erence to the direction of fiow of the gases to constitute a means for delivering explosive mixtures to a suitable point in said intake manifold, said second auxiliary pump producing a greater decrease in pressure in the reservoir than thedncrease in pressure in the reservoir due to the discharge from said aux- In a system for supplying fuel and air for internal combustion engines using hea fuels, in combination, a carburetor towhic 1 liquid fuelis-delivered, a main intake manifold, an auxiliary intake, a first auxiliary Volumetric pump driven synchronously by the motor, .a reservoir, a second auxiliary pump, and means for maintaining a proportional relation between the quantity of air directly taken in through the main intake manifold, and the quantity of air taken in through the auxiliary intake, said auxiliary intake, carburetor, first auxiliary .pump, reservoir, and second auxiliary pump, being arranged in the order stated with reference to the direction of flow of the gases, to constitute a means for delivering explosive mixture to a suitable point in said intake manifold.

4. In a system for supplying fuel and air for internal combustion engines using heavy fuels, in combination, a carburetor to which liquid fuel is delivered, a main intake manifold, an auxiliary intake, a first auxiliary volumetric pump driven synchronously by the motor, a'reservoir, a second auxiliary pump, and means for maintaining a proportional re lation between the quantity of air directly taken in through the main intake manifold and the quantity of air taken in through the auxiliary intake, said auxiliary intake, carburetor, first auxiliary pump, reservoir, and second auxiliary pump being arranged in the order stated with reference to the direction of flow of the gases, to constitute a means for delivering explosive mixtures to a suitable point in said intake manifold, and said sec-- ond auxiliary pump producing a greater decrease in pressure in the reservoir than the increase in pressure in thereservoir due to the discharge from said first auxiliary pump. 5. In a system for supplying fuel and air for internal combustion motors using heavy fuels, in combination, a carburetor to which liquid fuel is delivered, a main intake manifold, an auxiliary intake, a first auxiliary volumetric pump driven synchronously by the motor, a reservoir, a second auxiliary pump, a valve for controlling the volume of air drawn in directly through the main intake, avalve for controlling the volume of air drawn in throughsaid auxiliary intake, and a mechanicalconnection between the two said valves for maintaining a proportional rela tion between the'areas of their admission openings, said auxiliary intake, carburetor, first auxlllary pump, reservoir; and second auxillary pump being arranged in the order stated with'reference to the direction of flow of the gases, to constitute a means for delivering explosive'mixtures to a suitable point insaid intake manifold.

6. In a system for supplying fuel and air for internal combustion motors using heavyfuels, in combination, a carburetor to which liquid fuel is delivered, a main intake mani-- fold, an auxiliary intake, a first auxiliary volumetric pump driven synchronously by the motor, a reservoir, 8.- second auxiliary pump driven synchronously by the motor, said-aux iliary intake, carburetor, first auxiliary pump, reservoir, and second auxlliary pum being arranged in the order stated with re erence to the direction of flow of the gases, to constitute, a means for delivering explosive mixtures to a suitable point in said intake manifold.

7. In a system for supplying fuel and air for internal combustion motors using heavy fuels, in combination, a carburetor to which liquid fuel is delivered, and in which the fuel circulates from top to bottom, a main intake manifold, an auxiliary intake, a first auxiliary volmetric pump driven synchronously by the motor, a reservoir, a'second auxiliary pump, said auxiliary intake, carburetor, first auxiliary pump, reservoir, and

second auxiliary pump, being arranged in the order stated with reference to the direction of flow of the gases, to constitute a meansfor delivering explosive mixtures to a suitable point in said intake manifold.

8. In a system for supplying fuel and air for internal combustion motors using heavy fuels, in combination, a' carburetor to which liquid fuel is delivered, a main intake manifold, an auxiliary intake, a first auxiliary volumetr'ic pump driven synchronously by the motor, a reservoir, a second auxiliary pump, a cup placed beneath the carburetor to collect the liquid which is not removed by said first auxiliary pump, means for drawing off.

the liquid existing between the cup and the said first auxiliary pump, and delivering it to the intake of said first auxiliary pump, said auxiliary intake; carburetor, first auxiliary pump, reservoir, and second auxiliary pump being arranged in the order stated with reference to the direction of flow of the gases,

to constitute a means for delivering explosive mixtures to a suitable point in said intake manifold.

9.' In a system for supplying fuel and air for internal combustion motors using heavy fuels, in combination, a carburetor to which liquid fuel is delivered; a main intake manifold, an auxiliary intake, a first auxiliary volumetric pump driven synchronously by the motor, a reservoir, a second auxiliary pump,

means for spraying fuel between the said pumpand the reservoir, said auxiliary intake, carburetor, first auxiliary pump, reserture to a reservoir'in which said mixture is more thorou hly vaporized, delivering the output of said reservoir to a second pump,

and finally delivering the output of said second pump to a convenient point on the main 5 intake manifold of said en e. I

,11. ,The method of supp ying fuel to an internalcombustion engine which consists in mixing in a carburetor liquid fuel with air taken in through an auxillary intake, delivering the output of said carburetor to a volumetric pump which in turn delivers-said mixture to a reservoir in which said mixture is more thoroughly vaporized, delivering the output of said reservoir to a second pump, and finally delivering the output of said second pump to a convenient point on the main intake manifold of said engine and maintaining a proportional relation between the volume of air taken in directly by the main intake manifold and the volume of air taken in by the said auxiliary intake.

12. The method of supplying fuel to an internal combustion engine which consists in mixing in a carburetor liquid fuel with air taken in through an auxiliary intake, delivering the output of said carburetor to a volumetric pump which in turn delivers said mixture to a reservoir in which said mixture is more thorou hly vaporized, delivering the output of sald reservoir to a second pump which produces a greater decrease in pressure in the reservoir than the increase in pressure in the reservoir due to the discharge from said first pump, and finally delivering the output of said second pump to a convenient point in the main intake manifold of said engine.

13. In a system for supplying fuel and air 4 for internal combustion motors using hea O fuels, in combination, a carburetor to whic liquid fuel is delivered, a main intake manifold, an auxiliary intake, a first auxiliary volumetric pump driven synchronously by the motor, a reservoir, a second auxiliary pump, and means disposed around said reservoir for reheating the gaseous mixture, said auxiliary intake, carburetor, first auxiliary pump, reservoir, and second auxiliary pumpbeing arranged in the order stated with reference to the direction of flow of the gases, to constitute a means for delivering explosive mixgui'ss to a suitable point in said intake mani- JOSEPH BETHENOD.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4040400 *Sep 2, 1975Aug 9, 1977Karl KienerInternal combustion process and engine
US4483307 *Aug 2, 1982Nov 20, 1984Gilmor James EFuel vaporization device for internal combustion engine
US5226400 *Oct 8, 1992Jul 13, 1993Microfuels, Inc.Device for conversion of liquid fuel into fuel vapor and microscopic liquid droplets
US5322046 *Apr 13, 1993Jun 21, 1994Microfuels, Inc.Electronic fuel injector control for rotary vacuum fuel conversion device
US5343848 *May 3, 1993Sep 6, 1994Microfuels, Inc.Electronic fuel injector control for rotary vacuum fuel conversion device
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/533, 261/DIG.370, 123/545, 123/65.0BA
International ClassificationF02M69/00
Cooperative ClassificationF02M69/00, F02M2700/4397, Y10S261/37
European ClassificationF02M69/00