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Publication numberUS1806642 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 26, 1931
Filing dateApr 19, 1927
Publication numberUS 1806642 A, US 1806642A, US-A-1806642, US1806642 A, US1806642A
InventorsEnoch Ohnstrand
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Enoch ohnstrand
US 1806642 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 26, 193,1. E. OHNSTRAND BOOKS TACK Filed April 19, 1927 WW: 5H

| i Inventor [nod Uhqrarzd Patented May 26, 1931 UNITED STATES PATENT; OFFICE ENOCH OHNSTRAND, OF KENMORE, NEW YORK, .ASSIGNOR, BY MESNE ASSIGNMENTS, TO REMINGTON RAND INCL, OF NEW YORK, N. Y., A CORPORATION OEDELAWARE IBOOKSTACK Application filed April 19,

This invention relates to book stacks, and has reference more particularly to book stacks formed of sheet metal.

An object of the invention is to provide sheet metal book stacks which may be shipped to a customer knock-down and then assembled by the customer eas1ly and quickly.

Another object of the invention is to provide a construction for a sheet metal book stack which may be manufactured cheaply and which will be very strong and durable in use.

A further object of the invention is to provide a construction for sheet metal book stacks in which the various members are provided with interlocking tongues and apertures, the ends of the book stack having locking lugs which prevent accidental dlsassembly of the structure after it has once been assembled.

A still further object of the invention 1s to provide a construction for sheet metal book stacks in which a shelf is provided with a book end adapted to slidingly engage one edge of the shelf and to be rigid in construction.

Reference is to be had to the accompanying drawings forming a part of the specification, in which Fig. 1 is a perspective view of my improved book stack,

Fig. 2 is a sectional elevation through the book stack taken on the line 22 of Fig. 1,

Fig. 3 is a longitudinal sectional view through the book stack on the line 3-3 of Fig. 2,

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary perspective view on one end of the improved book shelf,

Fig. 5 is an end view of the interlocking hook on a shelf end,

Fig. 6 is an end view of an interlocking tongue on the shelf end,

Fig. 7 is a sectional view through the book 1927. Serial No. 184,924.

stack on line 7-7 of Fig. 1 showing the book rest, and

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary view on a large scale similar to Fig. 7, showing the book end or rest being attached to the edge of a shelf.

Referring to the drawings by numerals, 10 indicates vertical standards which are preferably made of sheet metal and are 111 the form of a square tube. A series of slots or apertures 11 is formed in the front face 12 of each tube, said apertures being adapted to receive hooks 13 and lugs 14 formed on shelf ends 15.

The hook 13 is formed near the upper edge of each shelf end 15, said hook being adapted to engage the metal section 16 between adjoining apertures 11. The tubes 12 are preferably made of fairly heavy gauge metal so that they will be rigid and strong when supporting the weight of a large number of books. It is necessary to make the slots 11 fairly wide in punching heavy gauge metal so that undue breakage of the punches will be avoided. The slots 11 are therefore wider than the thickness of the metal forming the shelf ends 15, and in order to prevent undue play or movement of the hooks 13 in said slots 11, a pressed bead 17 is formed in each hook 13. This bead 17 also greatly stiifens and strengthens the hook 13, since said bead extends the full length of the hook and into the body of the shelf end 15. The lugs 14 are also provided with a bul e or bead 18 which flares outwardly from t e inward end of said lug, said bead 18 being also adapted to nearly fill the space in each slot 11. In applying the shelf end 15 to the standard 10, the hook 13 is first inserted in the desired slot, and the lower end of the shelf end 15 is then swung downwardly until the lug 14 engages its corresponding slot. It is thus seen that the hook 13 prevents outward movement of the shelf end 15 away from the standard 10, and the lug 14 prevents side play of the lower end of shelf end 15.

Each shelf 19is preferably formed of sheet metal and along each edge is forined a downwardly extending flange 20, on the lower edge of which is formed an inwardly extending flange 21 while an upwardly extendin flange 22 is formed along the inner edge of flange 21. It is thus seen that the metal shelves 19 are greatly stiffened by the strengthening flanges formed along each edge. In order to connect the ends of each shelf 19 to the lower edge of shelf ends 15, a downwardly extending flange 23 is formed on each end of sh elves 19, and a lurality of slots or apertures 24 are formed in each flange 23. A series of ton cs 25 are struck out near the lower edge of s elf end 15, said tongues lying in a plane inside the plane of shelf end 15 and being adapted to enter corresponding slots 24 in flan cs 23. The shelves 19 are attached to shel ends 15 by first inserting the tongues 25 in slots 24 and then forcing the. shelf 19 rearwardly relative to shelf end 15 so that each tongue resiliently grips the metal section 26 between adjoining slots 24. When 25 the shelf 19 has been moved to its rearmost osition relative to shelf end 15, an offset ead 27 formed in each shelf end 15 has a square shoulder 28 which drops into and engages the inner edge of rear flange 20 so that subsequent accidental disassemby or movement of the shelf 19 relative to shelf end 15 is prevented.

It is desirable to provide a book rest or book end 29 for the shelves 19 which will suport a few books B, less than the number of hooks required to fill the space between shelf ends 15. This book end 29 is also preferably formed of sheet metal and comprises a body portion 30 having a laterally extending vertical flange 31 formed on its front edge, the lower edge of said flange 31 being adapted, preferably but not necessarily, to engage a laterally extending flange 32 formed along the bottom edge of body portion 30. It is thus seen that the engagement of the lower edge of flange 31 with ange 32 stifl'ens the structure of the book end and prevents the body portion 30 from bein distorted out of a vertical plane by the weig t of heavy books. For the purpose of detachably securing the book end 29 to a shelf 19, a downwardly extending flange 33 is formed along the front edge of flange 32, and an inwardly extending flange 34 is formed along the bottom edge of flange 33. An offset flange 35 is connected to the flange 3d and terminates in an upwardly extending flange 36 formed on the inner edge of flan e 35. The purpose of the offset between flanges 34 and 35 is that the flange 35 first permits the easy assembly of the book end 29 to a shelf 19 as seen in Fig. 8 and when the book rest 29 is moved to vertical position with flange 32 abutting the shelf 19, the flan e 34 will make a tight fit with the edge of she f '5 19 and prevent undue play of the book end 29.

Each standard 10 is preferably provided with two vertical series of slots 11 so that each standard 10 will support a air of shelf ends 15 with the inner faces of the adjoinin book ends spaced closely to ether in paralle relation. It should be understood that the upper ends of tubes 12 will be secured to the wall of a room which contains the book stacks and that the weight of the books will be supported by shelves 19 indirectly by the cantlziever action of shelf ends 15 on standards I would state in conclusion that while the illustrated example constitutes a preferred embodiment of my invention, I do not limit myself precisely to the details herein described, since manifestly the same can be considerably varied without de arting from the spirit of the invention as dzafined in the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent,

1. In a book stack, a plurality of standardsadapted to be secured in substantially vertical position, a plurality of shelf ends secured along one edge to said standards so that said shelf ends lie in a substantially vertical plane, a shelf extending between a pair of adjacent shelf ends, a downwardly extending flange formed at each end of said shelf, said flange being provided with a series of apertures, and a series of offset tongues formed along the bottom edge of each shelf end, said tongues being adapted to enter said apertures and lock said shelf to said shelf ends, said tongues forming the means for securing said shelf to said shelf ends.

2. In a book stack, a plurality of standards adapted to be secured in substantially vertical position, a plurality of shelf ends secured along one edge to said standards so that said shelf ends lie in a substantially vertical plane, a shelf extending between a pair of ad acent shelf ends, a downwardly extending flange formed at each end of said shelf, said flange being provided with a series of apertures, a series of oflset tongues formed along the bottom edge of each shelf end, said tongues being adapted to enter said apertures'and lock said shelf to said shelf ends, and a bead formed on each shelf end adapted to engage said shelf for locking the shelf to the shelf end and preventing the accidental disassembly thereof.

3. In a book stack, a air of shelf ends adapted to be supported a jacent one edge so that said shelf ends lie in a substantially vertical plane, a shelf extending between said pair of shelf ends, interlocking tongues and apertures associated with said shelf ends and shelf, and a bead associated with said shelf end adapted to prevent the accidental disassembly of the tongues from said apertures.

4. In a book stack, a pair of shelf ends adapted to be supported adjacent one edge so that said shelf ends lie in a substantially vertical plane, a shelf extending between said pair of shelf ends, said shelf having end flan es formed with a series of openin s, said shel ends having a series of horizontal y projecting tongues thereon in aligned relation adjacent the lower edges, said tongues having interlocking connectlon with said end flanges and extending through the o enings therein.

ENOCH O NSTRAND.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2551062 *Mar 15, 1950May 1, 1951Art Metal Construction CoShelf bracket
US2579704 *Feb 14, 1947Dec 25, 1951Reconstruction Finance CorpRemovable tray rack construction
US2626063 *Jun 4, 1946Jan 20, 1953Beryl G EchlinShelf partition
US2715467 *Mar 15, 1950Aug 16, 1955Smith Louis BStore fixture
US2739777 *Jul 29, 1950Mar 27, 1956Jewel Tea Company IncAdjustable knockdown shelf assembly
US2788902 *Nov 16, 1955Apr 16, 1957L A Darling CompanyAttachment mechanism
US2790559 *Jun 18, 1954Apr 30, 1957Saginaw Ind CompanyKnock-down shelving
US2840243 *Jun 13, 1955Jun 24, 1958Globe Wernicke CoShelf for partition structure
US2845187 *Jan 19, 1955Jul 29, 1958Proctor & Schwartz IncShelf assembly
US2891678 *Mar 25, 1957Jun 23, 1959Reflector Hardware CorpMerchandise support
US2911276 *May 10, 1957Nov 3, 1959Hamilton Mfg CoDemountable drawer support arrangements
US2940605 *Jan 3, 1957Jun 14, 1960United Fixture Hardware CoFurniture
US2982423 *Jun 20, 1957May 2, 1961Hirsh Mfg Company SaTray shelving
US2993603 *Oct 2, 1958Jul 25, 1961Fohn Jack ERemovable shelf construction
US3216377 *Oct 22, 1962Nov 9, 1965Sperry Rand CorpBookstacks
US4074812 *Dec 11, 1975Feb 21, 1978The Paltier CorporationPallet rack
US5042398 *Jan 29, 1991Aug 27, 1991Whirlpool CorporationRefrigerator shelf support method and apparatus
US5140915 *Jul 14, 1989Aug 25, 1992Knape Richard SPin and clip shelf mounting
US5275297 *Dec 8, 1992Jan 4, 1994The Croydon Company, Inc.Clip-on book support and label holder
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US6471081 *Apr 20, 2000Oct 29, 2002Raywood C. WeilerAdjustable bookend
US6598754 *Sep 30, 2002Jul 29, 2003Standrite Bookends, LlcAdjustable bookend
US9107497 *Oct 30, 2014Aug 18, 2015Sultan Qaboos UniversityAutomatic book-end system for shelves
US9326604 *Jun 5, 2015May 3, 2016Logiquip, LlcInventory system for wire shelves
US9364103 *Jun 24, 2014Jun 14, 2016C. Crabtree II PhillipShelving system
US20060049125 *Sep 8, 2004Mar 9, 2006The October Company, Inc.Removable space divider
US20060131252 *Dec 5, 2005Jun 22, 2006Tobias Lester RNotebook storage device
US20100278588 *Apr 30, 2010Nov 4, 2010Paul Hettich Gmbh & Co.KgConnection device
US20140374368 *Jun 24, 2014Dec 25, 2014C. Crabtree II PhillipShelving system
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EP2245963A1 *Apr 30, 2010Nov 3, 2010Paul Hettich GmbH & Co. KGConnecting device
Classifications
U.S. Classification108/61, 248/243
International ClassificationA47B96/02
Cooperative ClassificationA47B65/00, A47B96/027
European ClassificationA47B65/00, A47B96/02J