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Publication numberUS1807011 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 26, 1931
Filing dateMay 3, 1929
Priority dateMay 3, 1929
Publication numberUS 1807011 A, US 1807011A, US-A-1807011, US1807011 A, US1807011A
InventorsSichah-d Howland Eabtgee
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Assigwoe to eadio
US 1807011 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. H. RANGER 1,807,011

ANALYZING SYSTEM FOR MULIIPLEX FACSIMILE TRANSMISSION May 26,1931.

Filed May 5. 1929 INVENTOR R H RANGE ATTORNEY Patented May 26, 1931 sta RICHARD HOV/LAND RANGER, OF NEW'ARK, NEW JERSEY, ASSIG-NOR TO RADIO COB- FFEE POEATION OF AMERICA, A GORPORATIGN DELAWARE ANALYZING- SYS'IEM FOB MULTIPLEX FAGSIMILE TRANSMISSION Application filed May 8,

The present invention is directed to facsimile and/or television transmission, and, more particularly, to a scanning or analyzing system for use in conjunction with facsimile and/or television transmitters when used especially for multiplex communication.

By my copending application, Serial No. 321,821, filed November 26, 1928, I have disclosed an illumination scheme for either facsimile or television transmission in which a plurality of light sources have been arranged concentrically with respect to a reflecting light tube, and each source of light arranged to direct the light beams issuing therefrom to a single point on the record or television surface. By the above identified application, however, I have not attempted to adapt such scheme for multiplex transmission, and it is, therefore, an object of my present invention to provide an illumination system of the general type disclosed in the above identified oopending application and adapt the same to multiplex transmission;

and reception.

Therefore, as a primary object of my invention, I have sought to provide a method and means by which pictures and the like (by which I wish to include, views, photographs, newspaper articles, magazine covers, checks, finger prints, fashion plates, legal documents, financial statements, code messages, messages in foreign languages, television subjects,motion picture films, as Well as the sound records thereon, and the like) may be transmitted with substantially increased speed by reason of analyzing and reproducing a plurality of differentpoints on the picture or television surface simultaneously.

As a further object of my invention,I have sought to develop a method and means by which light rays corresponding to the intensity of light and shadow on elemental areas of the picturev or television surfaces may be split up into a plurality of light rays corresponding to the tone intensity of each individual point and then projected to a separate photo cell or to a single or a pair of photo cells each subjected to a light beam 1929. Serial No. 360,066.

so chopped as to produce definite tone or carrier frequencies. As an example of a means by which the multlplex transmission may be effected, reference is to be had'to my simile or television transmission 'vvhich is simple in its construction and arrangement of parts, a system'which is compact, conveniently installed, easily set up, readily operated, eflicient in its use, and a system in which it isunn'ecessary to continually make adjustments and readjustments so as to make the same suitable for use at all times; 2

Still further and ancillary objects of my or four channels, as illustrated, but that any number of channels found suitable and desirable from two to ten, or even more, maybe substituted by following the principles herein set forthand described.

Now particularly referring to the drawlugs, and first to Figure 1 thereof, I have shown adrum 1 upon which a picture surface 3 is carried in any. convenient and appropriate manner. The arrangement which has been illustrated has been provided so that the picture may be analyzed along ahelix by continuously rotating the picture carrying drum 1 and either advancing the drum 1 longitudinally with respect to the point of illumination or by continually rotatin g the drum and movin an illumination system longitudinally thereof in any appro priate and desir d manner. The invention isalso applicable to a type of facsimile transmission wherein the drum 1 is either moved longitudinally with respect to the illumination system or the illumination system is moved longitudinally with the drum so that lines extending in a tudinal direction of the drum are scaun and then the drum is advanced an am equal to the line ad ance for the i tel-mined number of channels in use w in the case of an arrangement of Q illustrated by Figure 1, would be two scanning lines.

Also, it is to be further un t id that the invention is not lim ted 40211111 18 transmission but may equally as well oe aoplied to television transi n drum 1 may be a flat Sen lace, In such a case the scanning i is broken up into a plurality of beams so that in the case of a lens scannii disk, for example, the size tnereof may b substantially increased, or of the usual si c with lenses sufliciently large to provii illun ination of the desired area of the surface, and the rer ected or projected rays passing thcrethrough may be split up into a number of distinct rays proportional the number of scanning channels in operation. 7

As has been shown in the i'lrzrviigs wl'ierein the inr tion has been i lustrated in its application to facsimile "we I have proyidee illum" eluding, a plurality of ii ranged in a concenr' tubular men her 7, my above referred to copending op i "ion Serial No. 321 821, filed November 26, 1925 1 T 'ihe light issmn from the illumination osed n source 5 whici may, if cesirei'l, be small amps of high c ndle power or intensity, is then directed by means of lens systems 9 so as to focus at a point 11 on the picture surface If the light beams issuing from the source 5 are focusei as a point source 11 on the picture si lace 3, it 111: y readily be seen that the entire illum nation will not be concentrated as a true point source since the intensity of illumination pree ds out to a slight extentand illumin s 111 area p"'o portionate to the spreading out of the light. Thus, more than a single element of the picture may be scanned illu ninateil at EH1) one time, and by means to be hereinafter set forth and described, it will become apparent how 1 thereafter sepa'atc the light beams corresponding to the separate and individual points corresponding, of .-ours-:e, to the number of channels utilized in lIi'flllw mission.

As light reaches the point 11 on the pic tur, surface 9, it is reflected back from the surface in the case of a reflection type of transmitter, wherein opaque or semi-opaque pictures or the like are carried by the drum 1 so tln t the reflected light enters the light tubular member 7, and by means of a lens system 13 the reflected light beau s are pro jccted backward. through the tubular member 7 to a diaphragm 15 arranged at the end of the tubular member opposite the pickup end. In order to shield the lens 13 directing the light bacizward to the tubular member 7 to the diaphragm 15, I have provided a shield 17 as was disclosed in my copending application, Serial No. 321,821, filed November 26, 1928, and the distance of this shield from the picture surace may be varied at will by any convenient method a, for example, by the n1 od shown and described in connection with the abev named copending application. As light is reflected backward through the tubular "nemb r 7 in the direction shown by the arrows, it impinges upon the diaphragm 15 which may be formed of two separate portions (referring, of course, to a two channel multiplex system) so to ass light through the openings 19 and 21 t ierein. These openings 19 and 21 may be ZlfljllSLGd in two planes by means of adjusting screws 23 (only one of which is shown). Adjusting screws 23 are for the purpose of moving the diaphragm openings 19 and 21 further apart or closer together depending upon the intensity of illumination upon the picture surface 3, and it will readily be seen if these diaphragms 15 are adjusted in two planes at right angles that a small square opening for light to pass through may be provided which will increase and. decrease in size or area proportionate to the adjustment of the adjusting screws As the light reflected from the picture surface 3 passes through each of the diaphragm openings 19 and 21 along the paths and. 27, it will be projected upon prisms 29 and 81 irom the faces and of which it will, 11

as shown, be bent at approximately a right angle, and be directed through the lenses el ctric elements 4e1and'l3. In such a case,

as above suggested, of course,the photo cells ell and 43 are placed with respect to the light chopping dislr so that they each receive light projected from the paths and 27, and in the case of a two channel system of the type herein disclosed, a double traclr chopping disk is provided, although for more chan nels the number of individual tracks on the disl: may be suitably increased, although the need for-increasing the number of photo cells is immaterial. F or the purpose ofs reening the photo cells from external light Ihave provided a high opaque housing member 40,

enclosing the entire optical system and photoelectric bodies. 7 i 7 Now referring to Figure 2 of the drawings, l have shown similar illumination elements for the picture surface and a similar light tube member 7 for projecting light reflected backward from the picture surface. However, in the present instance, in a case where four channels are provided in the multiplex system, instead of the diaphragm 15 being provided with the two square openings 19 and 21, I have provided four openings designated 4:5, l7, l9 andol. In such a case, the adjustment of the openings as to the size of the square hole through which the light is projected is controlled in the same manner as disclosed by Figure 1, by means of adjusting screws 23, which may be provided to adjust the size of the openings along two lines at right angles to each other.

As the light is projected through openings in the diaphragm member 15 along paths 53, 55, 57 and 59, it is split up into this particular series of light paths and is then proj ected upon a reflecting prism 61 from which the individual beams are reflected at substan tially a right angle from the face 63 of the prism 61. As the light beams leave the prism 61 along paths 53, 55, 57, 59, the

light beams are then projected upon a glass plate 65. Since there is very little separation in the individual paths of light (although for the purpose of illustration the separation has, been considerably accentuated), it is necessary to provide an arrangement by which the individual light'beams may be substantially separated one from the other so that they may be directed to the different tracks on the light chopping disk above referred to in connection with Figure l. I have provided on the upper surface of the glassplate 65, a plurality of reflect ing prisms indicated as 67, 69, 71, 73, each of which reflect a single light beam so as to spread the paths of the same to a considerable extent. As shown, the prism 67 is arranged to reflect the light beam 69 at right angles to the line in which it strikes the glass plate so as to direct the same along a path 59 to a reflecting prism from which it 18 reflected at right angles cel 79. 'Similarly, the light beam passing through the prism 69 is slightly bent to the left, shown, so as to be projected through a lens system'Sl, from which it may be'directed to a photo cell 83. In like manner, the light beam passing through the prism 71 is bent slightly to the ri ht, as shown, so as to be projected through a lens system to reach a photo cell 87, and the beam 53 passing through the prism 73 is then bent at right angles to the light in which it strikes the glass plate 65 so as to be directed along a path 53 against a reflecting-prism 89 from which it iscirected througha lens 91 to reach a photo cell 93.

For the purpose of clearness of illustration, 1 have chosen. to illustrate each of the light beams reflected by means of the prisms 67, 69, 71 and 7 3 mounted above the glass plate 65 as being directed to an individual photo cell. However, in practice, I have provided only a pair of photo cells ofthe general type shown in my'above named copending application, Serial No. 349,076, filed March 22, 1929 so that light arojected from each of the lens systems 77, 81, 85 and 91 maybe projected to a single track ofa chopping disk of the general character set forth by-the said copending application, and then directed to a pair of photo cells, it is readily seen that where there are a different number of distinct reflecting surfaces in each track of the light chopping disk that a different tone or carrier frequency will be produced upon the photo cells for each of the distinct paths of light, and thus, where an elongated photo cell is provided, if the lightbeams issuing from the disk are projected thereto, it is only necessary toeprovide two photo cells. It will be understood in connection with this application that the use of a plurality of analyzing beams of light is intended tobe used in connection with the disk of such type above set forth. 7

, While I have illustrated only two of the many embodiments which my invention will assume, it is understood that I may make many modifications therein, and the illustration and description while applied to the specific modification should not be limited.

means for separating the light beams reflected from the record surface by virtue of said illumination into a plurality of innce with the intensity hghtand shadow on elemental areas of the said surface.

2. A system for analyzi g pictures for multiplex transmisuon thereof which includes a record surface, means for illuminating the record surface, means for projecting light beams from the record surface of an intensity corresponding to the inten sity of light and shadow on the portion of said record surface illuminated, means for separating s i projected light beams into a plurality or .idependent and distinct light beams, a plurality of photoelectric bodies, and series of optical. bodies in the path of said plurality of light beams for causing said beams to separately influence said photoelectric bodies by each of said independent separated light beams.

A system for analyzing pictures for multiplex transmission thereof which includes means for illuminating a portion of a picture surface, means for directing light beams reflected from said picture surface in accordance with the intensity of light and shadow on the portion of said surface illuminated. along a predetermined path, means for separating said reflected light beams into a plurality of independent and distinct paths corresponding to different adjacent elemental areas of the picture surface, a plurality of photoelectric bodies, and means for reflecting and deflecting each of said independent light beams to separately influence said photoelectric bodies and produce currents therefrom of an intensity proportionate to the intensity of light and shadow on the picture surface.

4. An analyzing system for analyzing pictures to be transmitted including a support means for holding a record surface, means for illuminating the said record surface, means for separating the light beams reflected from the record surface due to the illumination thereof into a plurality of independent and distinct light paths, a plurality of independent light responsive bodies, and optical means for causing each of said reflected light beams to influence said light responsive bodies in accordance with the intensity of light and shadow on elemental areas of the said record surface.

5. A system for analyzing pictures for multiple transmission thereof which includes a record surface, means for illuminating the record surface, a light pickup system adjacent said record surface, means for projecting reflected light beams from the record surface through said light pickup means, said reflected light beams being of an intensity proportionate to the intensity of light and shadow on the portion of said record surface illuminated, a diaphragm means associated with said light pickup for separating said light beams reflected through said pickup means into a plurality of independent and distinct light beams, a plurality of photoelectric bodies, and optical means in the path of said separated light beams for causing each of said light beams to separately influence each of said photoelectric bodies.

6. A system for analyzing pictures for multiple transmission thereof which includes means for illuminating a portion of a picture surface, a light pickup means for directing light beams reflected from said picture surface in accordance with the intensity of light and shadow on the portion of said surface illuminated along a predetermined path, an adjustable diaphragm for separating said reflected light beams into a predetermined number of independent and distinct paths corresponding to different adjacent elemental areas of the picture surface, said paths corresponding in number to the number of channels in the multiplex system, a plurality of photoelectric bodies, and prismatic means for reflecting and defleeting each of said independent light beams to separately influence said photoelectric bodies and produce a current flow therefrom of an intensity proportionate to the intensity of light and shadow on elemental areas of the said picture surface.

RICHARD HOVLAND RANGER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2651463 *Jan 11, 1946Sep 8, 1953Allen Philip HOptical operation control device
US2929871 *Aug 27, 1953Mar 22, 1960Cross Edward DMask for facsimile scanner
US3441715 *Feb 4, 1966Apr 29, 1969Ncr CoSensing means
US4219850 *Feb 16, 1978Aug 26, 1980The Mead CorporationOptical encoder
Classifications
U.S. Classification358/425, 359/640
International ClassificationH04N1/191, H04N1/06
Cooperative ClassificationH04N1/06, H04N1/1911
European ClassificationH04N1/191B