Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1810528 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 16, 1931
Filing dateJun 12, 1929
Priority dateJun 12, 1929
Publication numberUS 1810528 A, US 1810528A, US-A-1810528, US1810528 A, US1810528A
InventorsPeterson Roy E
Original AssigneeHotchkiss Co E H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stapling machine
US 1810528 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 16, 1931. R. E. PETERSON STAPLING' MACHINE Filed June 12. 1929 gwuentoq;

Patented June 16, 1931 ROY E. PETERSON, OF EAST NORWALK,

PATENT OFFICE CONNECTICUT, ASSIGNOB TO THE E. K.

HOTCHKISS COMPANY, OF NORWALK, CONNECTICUT, A CORPORATION OF CONNECTI- CUT STAPIJING- MACHINE Application filed June 12,

This invention relates to stapling machines and more particularly to improved means for feeding and clinching the stapllles, and has for an object to provide a clinc 'ng means for stapling ,,machines which will so clinch the staple that it will lie flat against the surface of the work, thus overcoming the objections to the manner in which the staples are set by the ordinary stationary curved anvil which leaves the staples curved so that they project an undesirabledistance above the face of the work.

It is a. further object of the invention to provide a stapling machine in which a magnetic feeding means is substituted for the conventional spring feeding means. With the foregoing and other objects in view this invention consists in certain novel features of construction, combinations and arrangements of parts as will be more fully disclosed in the accompanying drawings.

In the drawings Fig. 1 is a side elevation of a stapling machine provided with my improved construction.

Fig. 2 is a front elevation thereof.

Fig. 3 is a vertical section on the line 3-3 of Fig. 1.

Figs. 4 and 5 are side and end elevations respectively showing the anvils.

The machine comprises the usual base 12 to which is pivoted the housing 13, of nonmagnetic material such for example brass or white metal, at 14 carrying the vertical' reciprocable plunger 15 for driving the individual staple 16. In the present machine these are wire staples either round or more or less fiat and fed on the non-magnetic guide bar 17 and are fed beneath the plunger 15 to operative position by a horse shoe or other suitably shaped magnet 18 which is held in proper place by any suitable means as a screw 19 in the housing 13. The poles 18' of the magnet are arranged on the opposite side of the plunger 15 from the staple guide bar 17 and preferably in line with the. prongs 16 of the staples on this bar as shown. The plungor 15 is operated by the hand knob 20 and is held in the upper position by spring 21 either inside or outside of the housing as desired.

1929. Serial No. $70,341.

forwardly to place the successive staples in position under the plunger, the magnet will hold the last staple or any loose staple in posltion under the plunger and prevent its dropping down or out the plunger guide way. This feed does away with the complicated staple feeds using springs and movable elements.

My improved anvil construction is mounted in a block 23 carried by the base 12 under the forward end of the housing. This block has a transverse slot in which are mounted the slidable anvils or staple clinching means. In Figs. 2 and 3 there are two anvils 24 each slidably guided ,in the block by the pin 25 and slot .26. Mounted below i 'tance above this plate and the forward ends of the housing and plate aremoved relatively to each other. Coil springs 29 may also be placed between this base and this plate toassist the plate supporting the base but permit the relative movement between the two. Carried by the base plate 27 is an upright block 30 which is beveled at its upper edge to form cam surfaces 31 on which the slidable anvils 24 rest and have their cam surfaces 32 in contact therewith. Recesses 33 in the anvils 24 provide pockets for receiving the ends of the spring 35 which tends to urge the anvils 24 apart to the limit of their pin and slot connections.

When the machine is not operatin the elements are in the position of Fig. 2. If now, it. is desired to staple sheets of papers 22 for instance, the forward end of the housing is raised and the paper is inserted beneath the housin on top of the block 23. If now, a blow 0% the hand is' struck on the knob 20 the plunger 15 is depressed forcingthe prongs of the forward staple which has been fed beneath the plunger by the attraction of the magnet 16 through the work it being understood that the staple is of substantially inverted U-shape with the prongs depending from the body. Continued movement of the plunger downwardly forces the forward end of the base 12 and the block 23 carrying the anvils 24 downwardly toward the plate 27 and the upright cam member 30 because downward movement of the plunger relative to the housing is limited by any suitable conventional means, such as a shoulder 37 on the plunger engaging a stop 38 in the housing. This causes the cam surfaces 31 of the member 30 to push upwardly on the lower cam sides 32 of the anvils 24 and slide them along their pin and slot connection to the position of Fig. 3. While they slide to this position the anvils engage the prongs of the staple and fold them against the under side of the work, as shown in Fig. 3. When the machine is in the position of rest these anvils are separated or urged apart to the limits of their pin and slot connections as shown in Fig. 2. It is preferred also that the upper edges of these anvils be grooved, as shown at 36, to better hold the staples in proper position. It will be seen from this operation that the prongs of the clinched staples shown at 16' Fig. 3, are pressed flat against the under side of the work and are not left curved as is the ordinary operation of the machine using a stationary anvil, because the stationary anvil in order to properly bend the prongs must have curved bending surfaces and they, therefore, leave the prongs curved so that they project in an undesirable amount above the surface of the work. With this present construction, however, the prongs are laid perfectly flat givingv a much better clinching effect, and as the staple does not project far from the surface of the work it is much less liable to catch on other objects.

Having thus set forth the nature of my invention, what I claim is:

1. In a stapling machine, a base, a housing pivoted to the base, a reciprocable plunger carried by the housing, an anvil carried by the base and slidable to force the free end of a staple toward the under side of the articles to be stapled, means below the base on which the base rests and movable toward the base, means carried by'the latter means to slide said anvil laterally on depression of the plunger and spring means to normally hold the base above the carrier for the anvil operating means.

2. In a stapling machine, a base, a housing pivoted to the base, a reciprocable plunger carried by the housing, slidable anvils carried by the base, yieldable means urging said anvils away from each other, means below the base on which the base rests movable toward the base, cam means on the latter means for sliding said anvils toward each other on movement of said plunger, and spring means tending to separate the base and said latter means. 7

3. In a stapling machine, a base, a housing hinged to the base, a vertically reciprocable plunger carried by the housing, means in said housing to feed staples to said plunger, a transversely reciprocable anvil below the plunger and operable in a direction at right angles to the direction of movement of the plunger and adapted to cooperate therewith to set the staples, and means operated by downward movement of the housing for operating the anvil.

4. In a stapling machine, a base, a housin hinged to the base, a vertically reciproca 1e plunger carried by the housing, means in said housing to feed staples to said plunger, a pair of anvils carried by the base below the plunger and slidable toward and from each other in a direction substantially at right angles to the direction of movement of the plunger, and adapted to cooperate therewith to set a staple, and means below the base and movable to cam the anvils toward each other. v

5. In a stapling machine, a base, a housing hinged to the base, a vertically reciprocable plunger carried b the housing, a pair of anvils carried by t e base below the lunger and slidable toward and from each ot er and adapted to cooperate with the plunger to set a staple, means below the base and movable to cam the anvils toward each other, and yieldable means urging said anvils apart.

6. In a stapling machine, a base, a housing hinged to the base, a vertically reciprocable plunger carried by the housing, a pair of sliding anvils carried by the base below the plunger, a subbase below'the said base normally spaced therefrom and movable toward it, and a cam carried by said subbase to actuate the anvils toward each other.

7. In a stapling machine, a base, a housing pivoted to the base, a reciprocable plunger carried by the housing, a pair of reciprocable sliding anvils carried by the base under the plunger and adapted to reciprocate in timed relation therewith to fold the ends of a staple against the under side of the work, and means below the base movable toward the 'same having means adapted by said moveon said anvils, a subbase normally spaced below the first base and movable toward it, and a cam carried by the subbase in contact with the cam surfaces of said anvils to actuate the anvils into cooperation with each other and with the plunger.

9. In a stapling machine, a base, a nonmagnetic housing pivoted to the base, a nonmagnetic staple guide bar carried by the housing, a reciprocable plunger carried by the housing, magnetic staple feed means carried by said housing, an anvil slidably guided by said base for cooperation with said plunger to set a staple, a subbase below the base, and a cam on said subbase in contact with said anvil to actuate the same on depression of the plunger.

In testimony whereof I afiix my signature.

ROY E. PETERSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2647814 *Feb 7, 1949Aug 4, 1953Gen Motors CorpClip clinching tool
US2656538 *May 11, 1949Oct 27, 1953William N AleshinPlant tying machine
US2866974 *Feb 13, 1956Jan 6, 1959Hoffman Harold GNailing implement
US3172565 *Jun 18, 1963Mar 9, 1965United States Steel CorpMachine for packaging articles in parallel
US3285489 *Aug 24, 1964Nov 15, 1966Signode CorpFastener magazine
US3305156 *Feb 1, 1965Feb 21, 1967Anthony Khan JosephFastener machines
US4096982 *Apr 19, 1977Jun 27, 1978Michael StahlAutomatic multi nail dispenser
US4640451 *Nov 7, 1982Feb 3, 1987Kollektivgesellschaft Eberhard, Steiner & Dr. StockerCombination hole punch and stapler
US4796793 *May 10, 1984Jan 10, 1989Ethicon, Inc.Surgical stapler and methods
US5857608 *Dec 5, 1997Jan 12, 1999Liau; Su-YonStapler
US6739492Jun 11, 1999May 25, 2004Acco Brands, Inc.Stapler for forming staples to various sizes
US6871768Jun 20, 2003Mar 29, 2005Acco Brands, Inc.Stapler for forming staples to various sizes
US6872781Sep 24, 2003Mar 29, 2005Arkema Inc.Forming membrane for batteries, fuel cells; chemical resistance, high strength
US7032795Jan 3, 2005Apr 25, 2006Acco Brands Usa LlcStapler for forming staples to various sizes
US7044349Jan 3, 2005May 16, 2006Acco Brands Usa LlcStapler for forming staples to various sizes
US7621433 *Dec 16, 2004Nov 24, 2009Isaberg Rapid AbStapler
US7905902 *Jun 16, 2003Mar 15, 2011Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical implant with preferential corrosion zone
EP1220737A1 *Jun 12, 2000Jul 10, 2002ACCO Brands, Inc.Stapler for forming staples to various sizes
WO1996009917A1 *Sep 27, 1995Apr 4, 1996Guenther W OrtleppDevice for bending wire-type materials
WO2000076730A1 *Jun 12, 2000Dec 21, 2000Acco Brands IncStapler for forming staples to various sizes
WO2012063664A1 *Oct 28, 2011May 18, 2012Carl Mfg.Co.,Ltd.Stapler
Classifications
U.S. Classification227/113, 227/120, 227/155
International ClassificationB25C5/02, B25C5/00
Cooperative ClassificationB25C5/0207, B25C5/025
European ClassificationB25C5/02F3B, B25C5/02D