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Publication numberUS1811728 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 23, 1931
Filing dateMay 31, 1929
Priority dateMay 31, 1929
Publication numberUS 1811728 A, US 1811728A, US-A-1811728, US1811728 A, US1811728A
InventorsRobert Mckee
Original AssigneeRobert Mckee
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Drainage device for roof gutters and the like
US 1811728 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 23, 1931. R. M KEE 1, 7

DRAINAGE DEVICE FOR ROOF" GUTTERS' AND THE LIKE Filed May 31. 1?9 3 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR ATTORNEY June 23, 1931. R. MCKEE 1,811,728

DRAINAGE DEVICE FOR ROOF GUTTERS AND THE LIKE Filed May 51. 1929 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 ATTO R NEY June 23, 1931. R. MCKEE 1,811,728

DRAINAGE DEVICE FOR ROOF GUTTERS AND THE LIKE Filed May 51. 1929 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR ATTORNEY Patented June 23, 1931 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE ROBERT MCKEE, OF PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVAN DRAINAGE DEVICE FOR ROOF GUTTERS THE LIKE Application med May 31,

It is well known that roof gutters clog up, due to leaves and other foreign matter, thereby allowin no way for the rain water to p drain off. ometimes thestoppage is caused by rags, paper and any foreign material that will not pass through the drain pipe leading from the gutter.

Therefore the present invention relates to an improved drain device to be inserted in the drain pipe and located between the opposite walls of the roof gutter.

The purpose of the invention is to provide a cage comprising a multiple of stays, arranged in cylindrical formation, withtheir lower ends free and unattached, therefore yieldable, to permit the drain device to be inserted in the drain pipe, hence. adapted to be sup orted in different positions, slightly above t e margin of the outlet end of the pipe,

' in order to allow the water to drain off. The

stays prevent foreign matter such as leaves and the like from passing through.

Another purpose is to provide an improved drain device having an outer abutment ring, with a plurality of inner rings in spaced positions and graduated, in order to carry ofl the rain water. at different levels in the gutter, the stays of the cage above the abutment ring acting to prevent the passage of foreign matter through the drain pipe.

' A still further purpose is to provide an apex cap at the top of the cage for retaining the radial bent ends of the stays in position, the apex cap in one instance, as shown in the drawings, having a depending cylindrical wall disposed in spaced concentric position with the uppermost ring member, so that should small particles of refuse stop up the spaces between the .various concentric 1929. Serial Nb. 867,562.

trically spaced rings, so th be fastened to each other.

It is to be understood that the particulars herein given are in no way limitative, and that while still keeping within the scope of the invention, any desired modification of details and proportions may be made in the construction of the appliance according to circumstances.

The invention comprises further features and combination of parts to be hereinafter set forth, shown in the drawings and claimed.

In the drawings s a sectional view throng tion ofa pitch roof, showing the roof gutter, and an adjoining cornice, illustrating the drain device as applied.

Figure 2 is a sectional view of another form of roof, possibly a tin or slate roof or the like, showing the roof gutter and the drain device as mounted in th leading from the gutter.

Figure 3 'is'an enlarged view in side elevation of the drain device shown in Figure 1.

Figure 4: is a vertical sectional view of the drain device in Figure 3.

Figure 5 is a cross sectional view on line 5+5 of Figure 4. V Figure 6 is a side elevation of another form of drain device, wherein the apex cap is slightly modified to that shown in Figures 3 and 4, in other words the drain device is similar to the one shown in Figure 2.

cross sectional view on line at the rings may e drain pipe Figure 7 is a 7-7 of Figure 6.

Figure Sis a vertical sectional view on line 8-8 of Figure 7.

Figure 9 is a view in other form of drain device, wherein the concentric spaced rings are slightly modified, in fact a less number of rings used.

Figure 10 is a side elevation of another form of drain device, wherein the stays of the cage do not extend upwardly and connect with the apex cap, the fact is they terminate at the lowermost ring.

Figure 11 is a view in side elevation of still another modified form of drain device, where construction is rectangular in cross see side elevation of an- 1,s11,7zs

Figure 12 is a. cross sectional View on line 1212 of Figure 11.

Referring to the drawings, 1 identifies a pit-ch roof, 2 the gutter, 3 the cornice and 4 the drain pipe, while in Figure 2 the roof 5 is approximately flat, which may be either tin or slag. Though there are two forms of roofs, the roof gutter in both instances are identified by the same numeral, and so is the drain pipe.

Adapted to be arranged in the drain pipe is a drain device 6, which in every instance comprises a cage 7 made up of stays 8, except ing in Figure 10 where the cage merely extends halfway of the device. The stays 8 are constructed of sheet metal, that is in strips. For instance each strip is bent longitudinally upon itself, the'bent portions being folded over to insure rigidity, and the stays are secured to a base abutment ring 9, which is also made of sheet metal, in a strip and bent longitudinally upon itself, as shown in the sectional views. The cross sectional construction of the stays is disclosed in the cross sectional views 5 and 7.

The stays extend above and below the abutment base ring, the lower portions acting to engage within the drain pipe, the drain device being capable of adjustment to different heights, so that the drainage of rain water may take place below the abutment ring. However the abutment ring may rest on the bottom of the roof gutter as shown in Figure 2.

Arranged within the cage is a plurality of rin 10, which are concentric with each other and suitably spaced. The rings are disposed in gradually increasing heights, so as to appear in conical formation within the cage, the different heights being for the purpose of draining off rain water at different levels. It is obvious that when the drain device is first applied to a drain pipe therain water will drain off at all times at a lower level. However should the first space become clogged, then the second space between certain of the rings will carry the rain water off, and should the second space become clogged, the third space will carry off the water and so on throughout the height of the cone.

In order to support the innermost rings 10, they are provided with lateral lugs 11, which are struck up from the rings themselves, as shown at 12. Theselugs are in turn soldered or electrically welded to adjacent rings, as shown clearly in Figures 4, 5 and 7. However the larger rings 13 at the bottom are fastened to the inner faces of the stays by any well known means, for instance soldering or electrically spot welded to .the inner faces of the stays, at a point adjacent the abutment ring 9.

The upper parts of the stays are bent at 14L and are radially inclined tothe cage, and as in Figures 3 and a the terminals of the inwardly bent portions 15 are fastened by soldering or electrically spot welding at 16, to an apex cap 17.

As in Figures 1, 3 and 4 the apex cap 17 is in turn fastened by soldering or spot welding to a cylindrical Wall 18, which depends into an adjacent ring.

In Figures 2, 6, 8, 9 and 11 the inwardly turned parts 15 of the stays are soldered or spot welded between inner and outer apex caps 19 and 20, therefore further insuring rigidity.

The lower parts of the stays are more or less yieldable, so as to engage within the drain pipe frictionally, in order to hold the cage in different positions.

Also in Figures 6, 8, 9, 10 and ll-the several innermost rings vary in number, which is more or less a matter of choice as tohow many rings the present type of drain device may possess.

In Figure 10 the construction of the drain device is more or less modified as compared with the other drain devices, in that the stays extend down from the larger base ring 21, while the upper part of the drain device is entirely opened, that is on the sides adjacent the various rings forming the conical part of the drain device.

The upper part of the drain device in Figure .10 has the apex cap 22 supported on the smaller upper ring 23 by means of supporting arms 24:. The supporting arms are soldered or spot welded or otherwise fastened to the ring 23.

The various lugs for mounting and supporting the several rings in position are struck up from the rings at various locations, so that all the lugs will not align in a radial direction.

In Figures 1 to 12 inclusive the various inner rings or members; that is, whether circular, rectangular or otherwise formed, are arranged at gradually increasing heights and are operatively supported within the cage and spaced in conformity with each other. The spaces between the plurality of rings or members constitute passages for rain water.

As previously stated the rain water will drain oil at different levels, accordingrasthe spaces between the rings may clog up.

The invention having been set forth, what is claimed is:

1. A drain device for roof gutters and drain pipes, comprising a cage having depending yield able-stays, which engage within the drain pipe, said cage having an apexcap supported at the top of the device, a plurality of cylindrical concentricspaced rings operatively supported within the cage at gradually increasing heights, thereby arranging the rings in conical formation.

2. A drain device for roof gutters and drain pipes, comprising a cage having depending yieldable stays, which engage within the drain pipe, said cage having an apex cap supported at the top of the device, a plurality of cylindrical concentric spaced rings operatively supported within the cage at gradually increasing heights, thereby arranging the rings in conical formation, said stays having an abutment ring to hold the stays in position, and the lowermost cylindrical ring being fastened to the inner part of the stays adjacent the abutment ring.

3. A drain. device for roof gutters and 'drain pipes, comprising a cage having depending yieldable stays, which engage within the drain pipe, said cage having an apex cap supported at the top of the device, a plurality of rings spaced in conformity with each other and operatively supported within the cage at gradually increasing heights, thereby arranging the rings in conical formation, said stays having an abutment ring to hold the stays in position, a ring fastened to the inner part of the stays adjacent the abutment ring, the upper parts of the stays above the abutment ring extending upwardly and then inwardly and fastened to the apex cap, the spaces between the rings acting as passages for rain water.

4. In a drain device for roof gutters and drain pipes, a cagev comprising an abutment ring, a plurality of stays secured to the inner face of the abutment ring, said cage having means to yieldably support the cage in the drain pipe, an apex cap supported at the upper ends of the stays, and a plurality of rings spaced in conformity with each other and operatively supported from the cap and located within the cage, the spaces between the plurality of rings constituting passages for the drainage of rain water.

In testimony whereof he afiixes his'signature.

ROBERT MoKEE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2687216 *Dec 27, 1951Aug 24, 1954Gen ElectricStrainer for receptacle drains
US3330417 *Jan 16, 1964Jul 11, 1967Harold GoldDrain device
US4555818 *Oct 30, 1984Dec 3, 1985Harrington Robert EWaste line trap
US5302283 *Aug 16, 1993Apr 12, 1994Meuche Howard OLeaf guard and strainer assembly for a gutter downspout
US6035580 *Jun 13, 1996Mar 14, 2000Carter; Christopher E.Self-priming drain guard siphon
US6817041 *Aug 12, 2003Nov 16, 2004North American Marketing CorporationSkimmer guard
US6959457 *Dec 17, 2002Nov 1, 2005Andre HernandezRoof vent ingress prevention device
US7544288 *May 16, 2008Jun 9, 2009Michael CookGutter filtering device
Classifications
U.S. Classification210/463
International ClassificationE04D13/04
Cooperative ClassificationE04D13/0409, E04D2013/0413
European ClassificationE04D13/04B20