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Publication numberUS1811781 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 23, 1931
Filing dateMar 26, 1930
Priority dateMar 26, 1930
Publication numberUS 1811781 A, US 1811781A, US-A-1811781, US1811781 A, US1811781A
InventorsDegge Eugene R
Original AssigneeDegge Eugene R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Overshoe
US 1811781 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 23, 1931.' E, R DEGGE 1,811,781

OVERSHOE Filed Maron 26. 1930 /fa i, 20 ze 4 20 4 iufmelgye Patented June 23, 1931 UNITED STATES PATENT or-'FlcE- e wenn n. nacen, or cmoieo, rumors ovnnmon Application ma ma so, mo. mm n. 439,105. f

This invention relates to an overshoe adapted to be worn over a spiked shoe in order to enable walking, especially in an emergency, I

over a hard surface, such as the floors of a buildin or sidewalks.

The device is particularly adapted to be worn over spiked golf shoes in view of the fact that the golf player frequently desires to visit his own or other oices in an emergency, or before, during or after play, and

under present conditions must keep his regular shoes handy and in such instances change them.

The particular object of the present invention is to provide the tread portion of the overshoe with means or elements which are relatively adjustable or yieldable so that they may be ositioned according to the location of the spikes of the engaged shoe.

Another object is to provide a construction in which the ground engaging means utilizes a plurality of crossed elastic cords, unconnected at the intersections or zones of crossing whereby the same may be stretched and arranged out of a straight line or normal position, when necessary, according to the location of the spikes ofthe particular shoe engaged thereby.

Various additional objects and advantages will become apparent from a consideration of the description following, taken in con-- nection with the accompanylng drawings illustrating an operative embodiment. In said drawings:

Fig. 1 is a plan view of the overshoe.

Fig. 2 is a central longitudinal sectional view through the overshoe taken on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1, and Fig. 3 is a cross sectional View taken on the line 3 3 of Fig. 1, and in addition suggesting application of the device to a spiked golf shoe.

Referring specifically-to the drawings, 10 designates the tread of the overshoe, the same comprising a sole portion 11, a shank 12 and a heel portion 13. Rising from the sole portion 11 is a relatively low upper wall 14 which is preferably highest at the toe and gradually decreases in height toward the shank. From the heel portion 13 a relative- 5 ly low upper wall 15 rises, and from the front thereof a dia onall dis sed counter stra 16 extends. g v y p All of the parts mentioned are preferably made of rubber, or rubberized fabric, or the equivalent, whereby the same willbe yieldable and flexible like an ordinary rubber overshoe. The upper edge of the upper section 14, the shank 10 and the counter strap 16 are preferably provided with a continuous reinforcing bead 17, having an elastic cord 18l embedded therein. a

The. device is adapted to be removably slipped or worn overy a shoe 19 as suggested in Fig. 3. Such shoe, specifically, may be a golf shoe having spikes v20 depending from the sole thereof. The re resentation and use of the shoe is to be taken as conventional since the invention is equally applicable to other spiked shoes worn for sport orother pur oses. T e major portion of the sole 11 is cut away so as to be open as at 21. 'Crossing the opening 21 at any desired angles are elastic cords 22 which are secured in any suitable way, as by stitching or otherwise, as at 23, to the sole 11 and shank '12.

Particular attention is called to the fact that the cords or elements 22 are preferably of rubber or other elastic material and are unconnected with each other at'the points of intersection, indicated at 24. This feature is of importance as the spikes 2O on different shoes va as to location. Since the cords 22 are elastic and may be stretched 0r independently moved, they may be displaced out of a straight line and arranged around the spikes 20 irrespective of their position or arrangement. It will be notedthat the cords 22 are of such diameter at the girth that they extend suiiiciently below the lower or sharpened edges of the spikes 20 to prevent contact of such edges with a floor, sidewalk or any surface engaged by the tread or lower surface of the overshoe.

The wall 13 is preferably open or cut away, as at 25, thus leaving practically a mar-gina] cushion pad about the heel of the shoe. In instances where the heel of the shoe may be equipped with spikes similar to those at 20, cords 22 may be arranged across the opening 25 in exactly the same manner as shown and described with respect to the sole proper.

As a result `of the invention, if the wearer of shoes, such as 19, desires to visit an oiiice in an emergency before or after playing golf, or in the midst of a game, he may wear the shoes 19 and apply overshoes, according to my invention. This not only enables walking on a floor or other hard surface but protects such oors and surfaces from injury by contact of the spikes 20 therewith, and also .protects the spikes 20 against dulling or undue wear thereby.

Another feature of the invention to emphasize is that the overshoe is of skeleton form throughout and is adapted to be readily folded into a compact article whereby a pair may be conveniently carried in the pocket of an article of clothing or the like.

Various changes may be resorted to provided they fall within the spirit and scope of the invention.

I claim as my invention:

1. In an overshoe, a plurality of elements to form a tread surface below spikes of an engaged shoe, said elements being movable one relative to the other for positioning according to the disposition of the said spikes.

2. In an overshoe, a plurality of crossed elastic elements adapted to extend below spikes of an engaged shoe, the elasticity of the elements enabling them to be adjusted to changed locations according to the position of the engaged spikes.

3. An overshoe having a plurality of crossed elements adapted to extend below spikes of an engaged shoe, said elements being unconnected at the zones of crossing whereby they may be adjusted according to the position of the said spikes.

4. An overshoe having an opening at the tread thereof, elastic cords in crossed relation spanning said opening and adapted to extend below spikes of an engaged shoe, said cords being unconnected at the zones of crossmg.

5. An overshoe of skeleton form to facilitate arrangement into' a small package, said overshoe having a sole, a shank, a heel, said sole and heel having openings therethrough, elastic cords in crossed relation spanning the opening of the sole and being secured to the sole, and upper portions rising from the sole and from the heel.

6. An overshoe of skeleton form to facilitate arrangement into a small package, said overshoe having a sole, a shank, a heel, said sole and heel having openings therethrough, elastic cords in crossed relation spanning the opening of the sole and being secured to the sole, upper portions rising from the sole and from the heel, a counter strap rising from the upper of the heel, said cords being unconnected at the zones of crossing, an elastic cord embedded in the overshoe at the edges of the adapted for angular disposition with 'relation to the edges of the overshoe whereby to adjust the same to the location of the spike on an engaged shoe.

EUGENE R. DEGGE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2958963 *Mar 9, 1959Nov 8, 1960Leslie Lougheed JamesOvershoe
US3176416 *Jun 3, 1964Apr 6, 1965Seegert Henry AGolf overshoe
US3313047 *Nov 17, 1965Apr 11, 1967Svien Jens ASpiked shoe cover
US3858336 *Nov 30, 1973Jan 7, 1975Brown Ronald ERemovable outsole for sport shoes
US4010558 *Nov 10, 1975Mar 8, 1977The Raymond Lee Organization, Inc.Golf rubber overshoe
US4693019 *Mar 3, 1986Sep 15, 1987Kim Sun KSports shoe protector
US5070631 *Jan 3, 1991Dec 10, 1991Fenton James RGolf shoe cleat cover with gripping members held slidably within channels
US5315767 *Dec 7, 1990May 31, 1994Bradbury Frank MShoe sole saver
US5737858 *Mar 15, 1996Apr 14, 1998Levy; Mark H.Training device for soccer players
US5794368 *Apr 29, 1997Aug 18, 1998Kirby; Alan A.Protective cover for spiked golf shoes
US6044578 *Dec 31, 1998Apr 4, 2000Kelz; William K.Ski boot walking attachment
US8887409 *Sep 23, 2011Nov 18, 2014Andrew AdamsDetachable shoe protector
US20130074363 *Sep 23, 2011Mar 28, 2013Andrew AdamsDetachable shoe protector
WO1998048654A1 *Apr 24, 1998Nov 5, 1998Kirby Alan AProtective cover for spiked golf shoes
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/7.5, 36/135
International ClassificationA43B3/16
Cooperative ClassificationA43B3/16
European ClassificationA43B3/16