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Publication numberUS1811893 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 30, 1931
Filing dateSep 21, 1926
Priority dateSep 21, 1926
Publication numberUS 1811893 A, US 1811893A, US-A-1811893, US1811893 A, US1811893A
InventorsParker Howard
Original AssigneeBrown Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Field threading and squaring machine
US 1811893 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 30, 1931. H. PARKER '7 FIELD THREADING AND SQUARING MACHINE' Filed Sept. 21, 1926 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 June 30, 1931. PARKER FIELD THREADING AND SQUARING MACHINE Filed Sept. 21, 1926 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Julie 30, 1931. I PARKER 1,811,893

FIELD THREADING AND SQUARING MACHINE Filed Sept. 21, 1926. 5 Sheets-Sheet s June 30, 1931.

H. PARKER 1,811,893

FIELD THREADI'NG AND SQUARING MACHINE Filed Sept. 21, 1926 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 v II Q curacy of performance.

Patented June 30,1931

UNITED stares HOWARD PARKER, 01 BERLIN, NE'W HAMPSHIRE, ASfiIG-NOR TO BROWN COMPANY" OF BERLIN, NEH] E-IAlZEQE-i muses r Price FIELD THREADING AND SQUARIL'NG MACHINE Application filed September 21, 1928. Serial No. 136,784.

This invention relates to mechanism for machining the ends of tubes, the mechanism being characterized by its relative lightness of weight, compactness of structure, and ac- It has the added advantage of being composed of simple parts which are easily made, so that the cost of the complete machine is relatively low.

WVhile the machine hereinafter described which is an embodiment of my invention is capable of operating on a wide range of materials, it is particularly designed for use with conduit tubes which are constructed of fibrous material such as intertelted cellulosic fibers which may be shaped into tubular. form by any suitable process and impregnated with a suitable saturant of asphaltic or equivalent compound. Such tubes may for examplebe made by pro-v gressively depositing a sheet of wood pulp on the cylinder of a paper machine, then rolling up the wet sheet of pulp upon itself under pressure to form a unitary homogeneous structure of interfelted fibers which when dried and impregnated with a suitable saturant, results in a product which is light and strong and is admirably adapted for use as conduits in many lines of work. In order to lay tight conduits oi indefinite length, the ends of successive tubes or lengths must be secured together with tight joints. One method of accomplishing this is to thread the ends of the individual lengths of conduit and. to provide internally threaded couplings to fit thereover. In order to provide against gaps or fissures between adjacent ends of consecutive lengths the ends of the tubes are carefully squared ofi" so that when screwed into a coupling they will abut tightly all the way around and will form a substantially unbroken interior surface in the conduit. It is likewise desirable in most cases that the interior surfaces of successive tubes or lengths or" conduit be accurately aligned to avoid the shoulders on the interior surface of the conduit which would be formed by abutting ends of the tubes if offset by inaccurate centering. The cutting of threads within the couplings and the which may be far removed from the mill, it

is necessary to use an odd length, as for example when a bend in the conduit must come at a certain point. A tube can be easily sawed off to the correct length, but it has heretofore been practically impossible to make'a suitable thread on the cut end without sending the piece back to tne mill. As this involved prohibitive waste of time and money, the machine embodying the present invention was evolved to provide portable means for threading and squaring the ends of such tubes. It is also adapted to operate with equal facility on. straight l ngths ofconduit or. on bends or irregular pieces such as ,T-joints. The machine is compactly built so as tobe stowed with tools and accessories ina relatively small chest which-is adapted to be used as a bench to support the machine when the latter, is secured by convenient, fastening means on top 7 of the cover thereof. 1

Further advantageous features of construction will'appear from the description of the machine which follows, and from,

section on the line 7-7 or" igure 9 is a section on" the line 99 of F1gure 2.

Figure 10 is a section on the line 101O of Figure 9.

Figure 11 is a section on the line 11-11 of Figure 2.

Figure 12 is a plan view of the cutting head showing squaring tool in operative position.

Figure 13 is a plan View of the cutting head thread tool in operative position.

Figure 14: is a side elevation partly in section of the chuck-expanding mechanism.

Figure 15 is a section on the line 1515 of Figure 3.

Figures 16 and 17 are sections on the lines 16 16 and 1717 of Figure 14.

Referring to the drawings in detail, the machine comprises, generally speaking, a non-rotatable chuck 30 adapted to fit inside the end of a tube 31 which is to be either squared or threaded and to hold it in fixed position, and a tool carriage 3:2 mounted to be revolved about the work and to be fed longitudinally of the work as by a threaded shaft 33 which is rotated by suitable gearing enclosed in housing 34-. By holding the end of the work fixed and revolving the tool around it, the machine can operate on conduits of any shape, such as bends.

Cutting head The cutting head comprises a block 35 adapted to slide on an arm 36 which is provided with an undercut longitudinal groove 37 A bolt 38 is provided with an elongated head 39 fitted to slide in the undercut portion of the groove 37. This bolt extends through the block and cooperates with a nut 10 to clamp the block 35 in iongitudinally adjusted position on the arm 36. The arm 36 is provided with a counterweight portion 41 and central bosses a2, 43 forming a hub member by which it is mounted for rotation on a quill 4 1 fixed in the standard 45 as by a set screw 46. Keyed to the boss 43 is a gear 47 which meshes with a gear 18 (Figure 9), the latter being keyed to a shaft 49 which may be turned by a hand crank 50. Rotation of the gears 48 and 47 will thus swing the arm 36 around the quill le which is aligned with the axis of the interior surface of the work so that the path of the cutting tool carried by the cutting head describes a circle concentric with said axis. Thus the threads cut on tubes with this machine will be accurately centered with the interior surfaces of the tubes so that the latter will be aligned when the ends are joined in a threaded coupling and will have no shoulders resulting from offset ends. In order to gauge the diameter of the path of the cutting tool, a micrometer limit stop is adjustably secured to the counterweight portion 41 of the arm 36 and may beused to determine the position of adjustment of the block 35 on the arm 36 (Figure 11). This limit stop comprises a bar 51 on a face of which is formed a series of teeth 52 adapted to interfit *ith complementary teeth 53 formed on the counterweight 41 (Figure 2). These teeth are preferably cut so as to be exactly from crest to crest. hence an adjustment of the bar 51 by the distance of one tooth will adjust the cutting head to operate on a tube of greater or less diameter. The bar 51 is adapted to be securely held in a groove in a lug 54 formed on the counterweight 41, suitable bolts 55,

'56 being set into the lug 54 so that their heads overlap the bar 51 and clamp the same securely in the groove of the-lug 54. The opposite end of the bar 51 is threaded as at 57, a micrometer head 58 being rotatable thereon for fine adjustment of the cutting head. To adjust the cutting head radially of the work, the nut 40 is loosened, thus allowing the cutting head to slide along the arm 36. The bar 51 and micrometer head 58 being adjusted to the desired position, the cutting head is slid down until stopped by the head 58 whereupon the nut i0 is set up tight to clamp the block to the arm 36 and secure the head in position.

The cutting head also comprises a square stud 59 which is secured in the block 35 and as shown extends out at right angles thereto, that is, parallel to the axis of the work. On this stud 59 tool carriage 32 is adapted to slide longitudinally of the work,

eing fed therealong by the automatically rotated threaded feed shaft 33'when a thread is being cut, or by a hand-operated feed device 60 which is turned when the end of the work is being squared. If a tapered threaded end on the work is desired, the stud 59 should be mounted obliquely soas to diverge from the axis of the work. Although for simplicity and strength the stud is shown as mounted at a definite fixed angle to the plane of rotation, it is obvious that its mounting could be readily made adjustable so as to change the angle as desired.

Tool carriage The tool carriage 32 which slides on the stud 59 comprises a channeled block 61, the channel of which is formed to receive the stud 59 and to bear against three faces thereof. As is illustrated in Figures l and 6, a split nut is fitted into the channel of the block 61, and comprises two members 63, 64 between which the feed shaft 33 is received. The lower member 63 of the nut is fixed within the channel as by screws 65 and bears against the fourth face of the stud 59. The upper member 64 is retained in the channel as by pins 66, 67 which engage in transverse grooves on the upper face of the no member 64 and pass through pairs of cars on the side of the block 61.

660, 670 formed on the block 61. The pin 67 is provided with a handle 68 by which it may be rotated. The central portion of this pin which engages the member 64 is cut away to form a recessed face 671. The members 63 64 of the split nut are shaped to receive the feed shaft 33 between them, but only a short length of the member is threaded, as at 69, to engage the threads of the shaft 33, the member 63 not beino' threaded at all. The threaded portion or the member 64 is at the end remote from tae pin 66 and is adapted to be swung out of engagement with the thread of the shaft 33 when the member 64 is rocked about the pin 66 as a pivot, as in Figure 5. Compresion springs 630 are set into the member 63 and tend to press the member 64: out of engagement with the thread of the shaft The pin 67 however, holds the threaded portion 69 in engagement with the shaft 33 as long as its cylindrical face is in contact with the member 64, as in Figure 4. W hen the pin 67 is turned by manipulating th handle 68 so that the recessed face 671 is toward the member 6%, the latter is permitted to rock on the pin 66 and disengage the threaded portion 69 from the shaft 33. Thus by simply swinging the handle 68 to one position or the other, the tool carriage may be made to feed automatically along the shaft 33 or not, as desired. The thread-v ing tool 70 is adjustably fitted into a ably shaped groove cut in a lug 71 formed. [as the lower end of tl e tool 7 O is ground off in the course of sharpening the edge thereof. it may be adjusted to compensate for the portions. ground away,'the tool being fixed in position as by one or more set scews 72. As shown in Figure 1, the thread tool 70 is preferably disposed in ponearly tangential to the Wei substantially in the usual radi position. This facilitates accurate ad usr ient of a tool which has been removed for "nenin and is an important feature in this type which is intended for use on the field and to be operated by workmen engaged in conduit laying, who may be unskilled in adjusting machine 3a l Hence the arrangement of the cutting tool is designed to minimize the effect on the work of errors of adjustment of the tool. hen a tool is held radially of an error of adjustment will result inr: error'of equal magnitude in the radius of the finished work. Where the tool is disposed tangentially or nearly so, it easy matter to bring the cutting edge up to a certain line on the support (such edge of the'groove 37 as shown l), and an eror of adjustmentsucn might be expected from careless or unskillful handling would result in a relatively S Cl C ca in the cutting head block 35 and in the side small error in the diameter of th finished work. A squaring tool 73 is pivotally sup ported as by a lag bolt 74 against a side of the lug 71. When the squaring tool is in the position shown in Figure 6, it is inoperative and is clear of the cutting edge 740 of the threading tool 70. When it is desir square the end of the work, the tool carria e is retracted from the work sufficiently to space the threading tool therefrom, and the cutting end of the squaring t- 3 is outwardly by manually pusl the upper FY I tool into operative position. pressure of the w against ti ing the operation of cuttn the tool in operative position, outward swing of the cutting end being limited by the engagement of the opposite end 76 against the face of the block 61. To change back to the threadin: operati n, is necessary merely to push the cutting end of the squaring tool inwa ly to the position shown in Figure and n .r to adjust the tool carri go toward the work to bring the cutting edge 7&0 of the t reading tool into operating relation thereto, this relation bein determined previously described by the position of the micrometer head'58.

Feeding mechanism supported by the shaft 33 which is ournaled members 81 of the housing 34. The iii, gear 80 is coaxial with quill 4a. Since the block 35 is adjustable toward and from the axis of the quill a l on the arm 36 the housing 34 and the gear 77 must al's o be capable of displacement relative to the gear 80. Gears 78, 79 are therefore provided to connect the gears 77 and 80, and are supported by studs journaled in the sides 81 of the housing 34. This train of gears maintains an operative connection between th shaft 33 and fixed gear 80 in any adjusted position of the housing 3%, the limiting positions of which are indicated by full and dotted lines in Figure 7. In order to keep the gear 79 in mesh with the gear 80 in all the positions of the housing relative to the latter, a pain of arms 83 (Figures and l 15) are provided to pass around. the pinion 80 at either end thereof and extend around the stud supporting the pinion 79. These arms retain the axis of the pinion-79 at a fixed distance from the axis of the pinion 8O permitting the rotation of the former about the latter. A suitable elongated opening 84 is cut in each side plate 81 to allow for the motion of tl e housing r' tive to the boss oi the arm 36 whih passes therethrough. Pivoted cover plates (not shown) may supplied to closely to the boss 43 to keep the elongated opcrr ing 84 closed against the entrance of dust and chips.

lVhen the machine is used to and square the end of a tube, only a relatively small amount of feeding of the tool earl iage is ordinarily desired. For the squaring operation therefore the carriage is disconnected from the feed screw 83 and is advancec by the hand feed mechanism 60 which coinprises a head 601 which is bored and threaded to receive a screw 602. The latter is pivoted as at 603 between a pair of cars (30-ii 'ormed on the block 61. Suitable ball and spring devices 605 may be employed to tain the head 601 in its operative or inoperative position, the latter being indicated by dotted lines in Figure When the squaring tool 73 is trimming the end of a tube, the reactive thrust from the pressure of the tool against the work tends to move the riage to the left (as in Figures 4 and The position of the carriage on the stud .59 is thus determined by the head 601 which abuts the block 35. in the operation of the machine, each time the tool carriage makes a revolution about the work, the head 601 is given a turn by hand to move the carr age to the right and slice oil a little more from the end of the tube.

Chuck holder Referring to Figures 15 to 18, a spindle 85 is journaled in the quill To one end of the spindle is secured a hand wheel 860 having a series of peripheral recesses 870 to receive a tool for setting up the wheel. The opposite end portion of the spindle is notched and is provided with right and left hand screws 87 and 86. On these screw portions are threaded a pair of nuts 88, 89 having tapering portions and castellated reduced portions 90, 91 for inter-engagement to prevent relativerot-ation of the nuts. The end of the nut 89 which abuts the outer end of the quill 44 is also castellated to engage complementary projections 92 on the end of the quill 44. Since the quill is fixed against rotation, both nuts are thus likewise fixed against rotation, so that rotation of the spindle 85 will result in an axial motion of the two nuts toward or away from'each other. The tapered portions of the nuts are adapted to support the ends of an expansible chuck 30 as indicated in Figure 14. The chuck may be secured against rotation by a key 94 set into the nut 89. It will be ap parent that motion 01 the ends toward each other will force the end portion of the chuck 30 to ride on the inclined face of the conical portion 88, 89, and will thus result in the expansion of the chuck. Since the motions of the complementary ends are equal and opposite, there will be no resulting axial movement of the chuck itself or of the work thereon when the ends are moved.

In order to replace a chuck by another 01 ditlerent size to accommodate work of difcrent size, it is necessary to move the end nut 88. This is done by first removing a lag lolt 96 and washer 95 which are secured to 1 end of the spindle 85 to prevent the nut 8 from coming off accidentally. The nuts related on the spindle 85 that when they are in the limiting positions apart, their castellated portions 90, 91 will just clear each other, thus permitting the nut 88 to be unscrewed and removed from the end of the die Then the nut 88 is replaced on e, must be screwed 011 to a point where the complementary portions 90, 91 l opposite each other in position to be In order to insure the nuts being the proper relative position, suitable slots 97 may so cut in the periphery of each nut in such a way that when the slots in the two nuts are in l the complementary portions of 90, 91 will also be in line. To facilitate in r ligning the slots 97, a bridge gage 98 is urovided adapted to extend around any chuck Map "h may be between the nuts and to on in a pair of the slots 97. When the slots are thus aligned, the spindle 85 is turned by manipulating the hand wheel 86, thus at once bringing the portions 90, 91 into engagement. In order to protect the inter-engaging portions between the two nuts and the end of the quill, dust sleeves 99, 100 may be provided. These are preferably secured for convenience to the nut 89, but may be instead held loosely in place or secured to any of the other parts covered.

In order to hold the machine in any desired position for the purpose of adjusting the cutting head or any of the other adjustable parts, a pin 101 may be provided to extend through the housing 82 of the driving gears and to fit in between any two successive teeth of the gear 48. In order to prevent this pin from being completely retracted from the casing and thus being in danger of being lost, the head thereof is preferably slotted as at 102 to receive the end of a retaining piece 108 which is arranged to allow sufiicient retraction of the pin 101 to clear the teeth of the gear 48, but not to be removed from the casing 82.

In place of the threading and squaring tools which have been described, other shaping tools may obviously be employed, it desired, to operate on an end of a tube either inside or out. Since the interior surface of the tube is accurately centered with respect to the axis of motion ofthe tool carriage,

the cutting of any tool supported thereby will be coaxial with the interior surface. Thus a conduit comprising tubes which have been threaded and squared on this machine will have a smooth interior surface which is substantially continuous, the interior edges of the abutting ends of successive tubes being flush with each other.

In operating the machine for threading and squaring, the operator turns the hand wheel 86 t retract cnuck 30 by moving the nuts 88, 89 away from each other. The end or a tube is then slipped over the chuck, the latter being thereupon expanded to grip the interior surface of the tube and hold it firmly in place. If it is desired to cut the thread before squaring, the tool carriage is slid along the stud 59 until the thread cutter is opposite the end of the tube. The micrometer head 58 is adjusted to desired position and the nut 40 is loosened to permit the cutting head block to slide along the arm 36 until it contacts with the head 58.

the

The nut 40 is then set up tightly, the carriage 61 is connected with the feed shaft 38 by manipulation of the handle 68, and the locking pin 101 is withdrawn from between the teeth of the gear l8. Operation of the hand crank 50 causes the tool 70 to cut a smooth accurate thread as the tool carriage is swung around the axis of the work with every turn of the hand crank. During the cutting, the carriage is moved along the stud 59 by the feed screw 33.

WVhen the tube is to be squared, the carriage is disconnected from the feed screw and the feeding device 60 is swung into operative position. The'nut 40 is loosened to permit the retraction of the cutting head outwardly. The Gutter 73 is swung into operative position by pushing its end 76 in with the thumb, the cuttin head is moved along the arm 36 to bring the cutting edge opposite the end surface of the tube wall. The feed block 601 is turned to bring the out ting tool in contact with the work, and the hand crank 50 is turned. At each turn or two, the operator turns the block 601 with his free hand to advance the carriage slightly along the stud 59.

Having thus described an embodiment of my invention, it should be evident to those skilled in the art that many changes and modifications may be made therein without departing from its spirit or scope as clefined by the appended claims.

I claim 1. In a machine of the class described, a stationary standard, means mounted on said standard for holding the work in fixed position, a member carried by said'standard revoluble about the axis of the work, a stud carried by said member and radially adjustable relatively to said axis, said stud being disposed in parallel relation to said axis,

a tool carriage slidably supported by said stud and revoluble therewith about the work, a feed screw disposed in parallel relation to said stud and engageable by said tool can riage,andmeans for rotating said feed screw continuously as the tool carriage is revolved about aid axis. v

2. In a machine of the class. described, means for holding the work in fixed position, a tool carriage, and means actuable to move the tool rarriage in. a helical path about the work, said actuable. means comprising a crank arm mounted to revolve about the axis of the work, a block mounted on said arm and adjustable longitudinally thereof, a supporting stud for said tool carriage on which the carriage is adapted to slide, said stud bein 'secured to said block and disposed parallel to the axis of the work, a feed screw shaft engaging said tool carriage, .a

fixed gear concentric with the axis of the work, a gear'on said screw shaft mounted for planetary motion about the fixed gear, and means for maintaining driving connection between the fixed and shaft-carried gears in all positions of adjustment of said block.

3. In a machine of the class described, means for holding the work in fixed position, a tool carriage mounted for adjustment toward and from the axis of the work, means actuable to revolve the carriage about the work, and means for feeding the carriage axially of the work as it is revolved, said feeding means comprising a fixed gearconcentric with the axis of the work, a feed screw shaft, engaging the tool carriage, a gear fixed to said screw shaft, intermediate gearing connecting said fixed and shaft-carried gears, and meansfor keeping all said gears in mesh in allpositions of adjustment of said tool carriage.

4. In a machine for squaring and threading conduit, mechanism including a tool adjustably fixed on said carriage, a squaring tool mounted to be movable relatively to the carriage into and out of operative position, and means actuable to revolve said tool carriage around the work. V

5. In a machine of the class described, a tool having a longitudinal face extending substantially the length of the tool and terminating in a cutting edge, a tool carriage, means for adjusting the tool carriage radially of the work, and means for adjusting the tool while maintaining said face in a plane substantially tangent to the work.

6. In a machine of the class described, a tool carriage, a' tool having a longitudinal face extending substantially the length. of the tool and terminating in a cutting edge mounted in said carriage, said face being in a plane substantially tangent to the work, and means for adjusting the tool longitudinally of itself in said carriage.

a tool carriage, thread-cutting 7. In a machine of the class described, a tool carriage, means for revolving said carriage about the work, means for adjusting said carriage radially of the work, a tool having a longitudinal face extending in the direction of the length of the tool and terminating in a cutting edge mounted in said carriage, said face being'in a plane substantially tangent to the work, and means for adjusting said tool longitudinally of itself in said carriage.

S. The method of adjusting a tool having a longitudinal face terminating in a cutting edge, which comprises mounting it with said face in a plane substantially tangent to the work, and adjusting the tool longitudinally of itself to aline the cutting edge with a line of'reference extending radially of the work.

9. In a machine of the class described, a standard, means carried by said standard for holding the work in fixed position, and vmeans also carried by said standard actuable to revolve a tool about the work in a helical path coaxial with the work, said revolving means comprising a radial arm revoluble about the axis of the work in a plane perpendicular to the axis, a tool carriage mounted for longitudinal adjustment on said arm, means actuable to revolve said arm, and means for feeding said carriage and tool longitudinally of the work during the revolution of said carriage and tool aboutithe work.

10. In amachine of the class described, astandard, means carried by saidstandard for holding the work in fixed position, a radial arm carried by said standard and mounted for revolution about the axis of the work, said arm being held against axial movement along the work, a tool and tool carriage carried by said arm and revoluble therewith about the work, and means for feeding the tool and carriage with respect to said arm in an axial direction. during the revolution thereof.

11. In a machine of the class described, means for holding the work in fixed position, a radial-arm mounted for revolution about the axis of the work, said arm being held against axial movement along the work, a. tool and tool carriage carried by said arm and revoluble therewith about the work, means for feeding the tool and carriage with respect to said arm in an axial direction duringfthe, revolution tnereof, saidv feeding means including a crank and handle, and a standard supporting the entire machine and located between the work-holding means and said crank.

Intestimony whereof I have afiiXed my signature.

HOWARD PARKER,

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3273432 *Jul 10, 1964Sep 20, 1966Thomas A Short CompanyUniversal self-centering flange facing device
US4114484 *Nov 16, 1976Sep 19, 1978Feamster Iii William CPipe cutting or end prepping apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification82/128, 470/80
International ClassificationB31C11/02
Cooperative ClassificationB31C11/02
European ClassificationB31C11/02