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Publication numberUS1813039 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 7, 1931
Filing dateMar 27, 1930
Priority dateMar 27, 1929
Publication numberUS 1813039 A, US 1813039A, US-A-1813039, US1813039 A, US1813039A
InventorsJules Escol
Original AssigneeJules Escol
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Protecting sheath for electric wires
US 1813039 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 7, 1931. J ESCOL 1,813,039

PROTECTING SHEATH FOR ELECTRIC WIRES Filed March 27; 1930 Patented July 7, 1931 UNITED STATES JULES ESCOL, OI CHATELET, BELGIUM rnorncrme. snmrn roa ELECTRIC wrans Application filed March 27, 1930, Serial No. 439,509, and in- Belgium March 27, 1929.

The object of this invention is a rigid sheath for the mechanical protection of electric wires, constructed in such a manner that it may be easily bent or curved by hand notwithstanding the rigidity of its side walls.

To this end, transverse notches are pro-- vided in the four sides of this sheath which is made of substantially rectangular cross section, and the arrangement is such that the notches in two opposite sides of the sheath face each other and are about half-way between the notches in the two remainin sides. With such an arrangement of the notches the sheath ma be curved or bent edgewise or flatwise, without the hel of any tool.

The sheath is made 0 a continuous metal band bent lengthwise. Its longitudinal joint is preferably closed by clasping and may be made tight by double 'clasping and/or by 2o welding. The sheath may enclose one or more electric wires according to its size.

The accompanying drawings show by way of example a sheath with two conductors therein. In the drawings:

Fig. 1 shows a section of a sheath both in side and top view, on an enlarged scale;

Fig. 2 is a cross-sectional view of the sheath, also on an enlarged scale, and

' Figs. 3 and 4 show, in actual size, two sections of a sheath curved flatwise and edgewise respectively.

The sheath 1 is made from a com aratively rigid continuous metal band, pre erably of electrolytic zinc, which is bent four times at right angles along its length so as to form around the electric wires 2 a protecting covering, substantially rectangular in cross-section'. The 'edges of the metal band are clasped together at 1 on one side of the 40 sheath, thereby forming along said side a continuous joint which may be welded if desired to secure absolute tightness.

In this way a cheap and light sheath is obtained wherein the wires 2 are effectively protected against blows and other mechanical actions by t e rigid metal of which it is made. In order that this sheath may be easily bent by hand, notches are made across its four sides, in order to enable the metal to be deformed wit out breaking when the sheath inverted.

is being curved. The notches 3 in the two large sides of the sheath, as well as the notches 3 in the small sides of the sheath are exactly opposite each other, but these notches 3 and 3 are alternated so as to be about halfway from each other as shown in Fig. 1.

In this way the sheath can readily be bent or curved fiat-or crosswise. When the sheath is curved fiatwise, the notches 3 situated in the small side of the sheath towards the outside of the curve are stretched thus providing for the increase in length of that side, whereas. the small side of the sheath which is the inside of the curve is bent in a bellows-like manner, and the notches 3 in the large sides vanish towards the outside and get marked more deeply towards the inside of the curve as shown in Fig. 3'. When the sheath is curved edgewise (Fig. 4), the same deformation takes place, but the way in which the notches 3 and .3 respectively behave is It will be understood that more or'less than two electricwires may be enclosed in the sheath and the latter may be subjected to various modifications of its details without departin from the present invention as de 0' fined in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In combination with an insulated electric conductor, a continuous protecting sheath enclosing said conductor throughout its len h, said sheath being made of a rigid metal aving a polygonal cross-section with an even number of sides, said sides having transverse notches therein, the notches in diametrically opposite sides facing each other.

2. In combination with an insulated electric conductor, a continuous protectingsheath enclosing said conductor throughout its length, said sheath being made of a rigid metal and having a rectangularcross section,

the sides of said sheath having transverse notches therein, the notches in two opposite sides facing each other and being located half way between the notches in the other two sides." I

3. In combination with an insulated electric conductor, a continuous protecting sheath enclosing said conductor throughout its length, said sheath being made of a strip of ri 'd metal bent to rectangular shape, the si s of said sheath having transverse notches therein, the notches in two opposite sides fac- 5 ing each other and alternating with the notches in the other two sides.

4. In combination with an insulated electric conductor, a continuous protecting sheath enclosingsaidconductorthroughoutits length, said sheath being made of a strip of rigid metal bent to rectangular shape, the longitudinal edges of said sheath bein united by clasping, two opposite sides of sai sheath having transverse notches facing each other, the other sides of said sheath having transverse notches facing each other at mid-distance between the first mentioned notches.

In testimony whereof I affix my si ature. 1 JULES E COL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3133588 *Feb 15, 1960May 19, 1964Pappas Philip MFormable gas burner
US3412628 *Jul 14, 1966Nov 26, 1968Koppy Tool CorpShock absorbing structural member
US3448892 *Aug 24, 1966Jun 10, 1969Arvin Ind IncFuel tank filler tube
US5001303 *May 26, 1989Mar 19, 1991Coleman Cable Systems, Inc.Metallic sheath electrical cable
US5095915 *Mar 19, 1990Mar 17, 1992Target TherapeuticsGuidewire with flexible distal tip
US5189719 *Feb 5, 1991Feb 23, 1993Coleman Cable Systems, Inc.Metallic sheath cable
US5599492 *Dec 16, 1994Feb 4, 1997Target Therapeutics, Inc.Method for making a guidewire with a flexible distal tip
US5849379 *Jan 6, 1997Dec 15, 1998Bentley-Harris Inc.Wrappable sleeve
US6056018 *Oct 29, 1997May 2, 2000E.I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyVariable stiffness bellows
US6116289 *Jan 20, 1999Sep 12, 2000Tigers Polymer CorporationFlexible hoses and joint structures thereof
US6123113 *May 1, 1997Sep 26, 2000Itt Manufacturing Enterprises, Inc.Asymmetrical convolute tube
US6309721Dec 3, 1998Oct 30, 2001Federal-Mogul Systems Protection Group, Inc.Flexible protective sleeve
US6397893 *Aug 30, 1999Jun 4, 2002Delaval Holding AbEasily bendable tubing for two separate fluids
US6684909 *Aug 23, 2002Feb 3, 2004Honda Giken Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaResinous hose
US7420120Dec 3, 2004Sep 2, 2008Wpfy, Inc.Flexible conduit and cable
US20020197430 *Aug 23, 2002Dec 26, 2002Honda Giken Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaProcess for producing resinous hose and resinous hose
US20060131044 *Dec 3, 2004Jun 22, 2006Vertente Michael JFlexible conduit and cable
US20080119123 *Nov 10, 2006May 22, 2008Ford Motor CompanyFuel filler pipe having trigger point
WO2012086687A1 *Dec 21, 2011Jun 28, 2012Autonetworks Technologies, Ltd.Shield conductor
Classifications
U.S. Classification174/102.00D, 138/128, 138/121
International ClassificationH01B7/18, H01B7/20
Cooperative ClassificationH01B7/202
European ClassificationH01B7/20C