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Publication numberUS1813259 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 7, 1931
Filing dateFeb 25, 1929
Priority dateFeb 25, 1929
Publication numberUS 1813259 A, US 1813259A, US-A-1813259, US1813259 A, US1813259A
InventorsJacob Schick
Original AssigneeSchick Dry Shaver Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Engine
US 1813259 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 7, 1931. J. SCHICK 1,813,259

' ENGINE Filed Feb. 25, 1929 lNV TOR AT RNEY.

Patented July 7, 1931 UNITED, STATES PATENT OFFICE JACOB SGHIGK, OF SOUND BEACH, CONNECTICUT, ASSIGNOR TO SCHICK .DRY SHAV'EB, 1170., A CORPORATION OF DELAWARE ENGINE Application filed February 25, 1929. Serial No. 342,369.

The object of this invention is to providean engine either an internal combustion engine or a steam engine or a pump which. has but I haust pipe is shown on the outer side of the cylinder and an exhaust port 21 of each cylinder communicates from theinside of the cylinder to this exhaust pipe.

few moving partsand which eliminates the. I uneven wear on pistons that are used inconmotion with connecting rods or similar ap The unit opeates as a four cycle engine 5 and when one cylinder plston is moving on i.

low main shaft of the engine. The invention will be more fully understood from an inspection of the accompanythe bases of the bearings aratus for converting reciprocating-motion into rotary motion. I 1

The object-of this invention is, further, to

10 provide a piston'in a cylinder which when it 20 ast the inlet manifold to heat the incoming el. Thisexhaust passage and intake manifold are preferably located within the holing' drawingsin which Figure 1 is a section throu h the cylinders of an engine of my improve type and also showing the main shaft n section. Figure 2 is an end view of an en- 80 gine such as shown in Figure 1 and consisting of four units, the upper one beingshown in full lines and partly broken away to show the interior construction. I

The cylinders are shown at 10 and 11 and are opposed and axially aligned. Each cyl-' inder contains a piston 12 and these pistons are connected by a shaft 13/which may have a central support such as the bearing 14 in which the shaft both 'rotates and slides...

Abutments 15 are placed where the rear cam 'faces 16 of the pistons bear on them t9 cause the rotation of the piston when the "piston is reciprocated toward the abutment. In the form shown these abutme'nts are provided by I 14. The main shaft is shown at 17 and is rotated bya gear17' in mesh with a pinion 18 on the shaft 13, the shaft 13 being 'arra'n ed so that it can rotate the pinion 18 but slide therein, and I show I a feather 19 for such function. A main exits power stroke the other piston is operating on its compression stroke or its scavenging stroke. The ports 21 are opened by reason of the piston moving far-enough to uncover the I port 21'. A k

The engine I illustrate is an internal coinbustion engine and I/ show spark plugs 22 to indicate the power end of the pistons.

At the inner side of each piston is ,a port 23' and within the shaft is an exhaust passage 24 and aninlet manifold 25, the latter carrying the fuel mixture. This exhaust passage and the intake manifold rotate with the shaft so that the exhaust'opening 26 of the exhaust passage 24 and the inlet passage 27 of the intake manifold functionally register with the -port 23 in a cylinder.

In the case of four units,-each consisting of two cylinders as shown in Figure 2, they main shaft 16 is" rotated at halfthe speed of the rotation of'the shaft 13 and this operates r j these cylinders in their proper sequence so that theymay successively operate to rotate the main shaft. As these cylinders can be arranged to have their operation overlapping and in the absence of unbalanced valves and crank shafts, vibration is eliminated.

A manually operated control member 1s interposed between the passages in the shaft i and the port 23 of the cylinder. This is illustrated as a sleeve 28 which has a flange 29 regulated by a pinion 30 which the teeth 31- on the flange.

The pinion 30is on a shaft ates a similar pinion on the other end ofthe engine. The sleeve 28 has the, port or passage 33, one for each cyl1nder, and as the sleeve is advanced or retreated the duratlon of the exhaust and, more particularly, the 95 point of cut-off of the fuel can be controlled. In this engine the exhaust at first is through the major opening 21 and when this is closed by the return of the pistonlthe' gases are forced out through the ports 23, 26 and 33 m9 ,7

meshes with A 32 which operand thus through the exhaust passage 24. This insures a complete scavenging and also heats the intake manifold 25 and thus heats the incoming fuel. As the shaft turns it x presents the intake manifold, the port 27 comes around to port 23, the piston is on its suction stroke and the cylinder is changed.

' The sleeve 28 by its adjpstment varies the reciprocation.

2. An engine comprising a pair of cylinders axially aligned, a piston in each cylinder, a shaft to which the pistons are secured, each piston having a cam surface, and abutments for said surfaces whereby the pistons and cam are rotated when the pistons reciprocate.

3. An engine comprising a pair of cylinders axially aligned, a piston in each cylinder, a shaft connecting the pistons, the pistons having cam surfaces on their opposed faces, abutments in the cylinders to beengaged by the cams to force the cylinders to rotate when they reciprocate, the cylinders having exhaust ports in their walls and disa main shaft driven from the shaft the shaft having an exhaust passage and a fuel passage therein with opening to register with the ports in the cylinders and a control member interposed between the cylinder and the main shaft with an opening to be placed in selected positions to control the duration of open ing of the cylinder port.

pistons, connecting the piston,

An engine comprising a cylinder, a piston in the cylinder, the cylinder having a port to be opened and'closed by the piston, a shaft rotatable alongside the cylinder, a connection for rotating the shaft from the piston, a manifold in the shaft, the cylinder having a port and the shaft and manifold having an opening to be placed in register with the port as the shaft is rotated, and a control member movable between the shaft and the cylinder and having an opening for regulat the'passage of fluid to and from the cylmg inder. Y

In testimony whereof I aflix my signature.

JACOB S CHICK.

posed so as to be opened and closed by the pistons.

4. An engine comprising a pair of opposed cylinders, pistons in the cylinders, a

the cylinders, the pistons having cam surfaces to engage the abutments whereby the. piston and the shaft are caused to revolve when they reciprocate.

5. An engine comprising a pair of opposed cylinders, pistons in the cylinders, a shaft secured to the pistons, abutments in the cylinders, the pistons having cam surfaces to engage the abutments whereby the pistons and the shaft are caused to revolve when they reciprocate, the cylinders having ports opened and closed by the pistons, a main shaft driven from the shaft connecting" the pistons, the shaft having an'exhaust passage and a fuel passage therein with openings to register with the ports in the cylinders.

6. An engine comprising a pair of opposed cylinders, pistons in the cylinders, a shaft secured to the pistons, abutments in the cylinders, the pistons having cam surfaces to engage the abutments whereby the pistons and the shaft are caused to revolve when they reciprocate, the cylinders having ports opened and closed by the shaft secured to the pistons, abutmentsin

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2439867 *Oct 8, 1942Apr 20, 1948Schaeffer Donald WInternal-combustion engine
US3396709 *May 9, 1966Aug 13, 1968Gulf Oil CorpRoto-piston engine
US3403668 *Apr 4, 1966Oct 1, 1968Henry SchottlerFluid transducer
US3745887 *Jun 18, 1971Jul 17, 1973Temco Contact LtdEngine power unit
US3757748 *Jan 17, 1972Sep 11, 1973J ArneyRotating combustion engine
US3910242 *Jul 25, 1974Oct 7, 1975Hom HawkinsInternal combustion engine
US4088033 *Aug 9, 1976May 9, 1978Ewald HarrPiston power generating machine
US6662775Oct 2, 2002Dec 16, 2003Thomas Engine Company, LlcIntegral air compressor for boost air in barrel engine
US6698394Oct 30, 2001Mar 2, 2004Thomas Engine CompanyHomogenous charge compression ignition and barrel engines
US8046299Jan 12, 2004Oct 25, 2011American Express Travel Related Services Company, Inc.Systems, methods, and devices for selling transaction accounts
DE102012210639A1 *Jun 22, 2012Dec 24, 2013Robert Bosch GmbhAxial piston machine e.g. double working axial piston machine, has inlet conveying work fluid into workspace, and outlet conveying work fluid from workspace, where inlet and/or outlet are controlled by rotation of piston around axis
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/45.00R, 123/63, 123/56.9
International ClassificationF01B9/00, F01B9/04
Cooperative ClassificationF01B9/042
European ClassificationF01B9/04G