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Publication numberUS1817860 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 4, 1931
Filing dateNov 30, 1926
Priority dateNov 30, 1926
Publication numberUS 1817860 A, US 1817860A, US-A-1817860, US1817860 A, US1817860A
InventorsGeorge Wahnish
Original AssigneeCharles M Bleecker
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carburetor
US 1817860 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 4, 1931. s. WAHNISH CARBURETOR Filed Nov. 50-, 1926 [NVENTOR Georje h ahm'slz Fetented Aug. 4, 1931 entra n sures mm easier G-EQEGE WAHNISH, 91 NW YORK, NJY ASSIGNOR 01 ONE-FOURTH T CHARLES H.

BLEECKER, OF NEW YQBK, N. Y.

GABBURETOR Application. filed November 30, 1926. Serial No. 151,667.

The invention relates to carburetors for providing a proper mixture of liquid fuel and air under various running conditions met with when thecarburetor is associated, for

example, with the internal combustion engine of a self-propelled vehicle; It relates more especially to the type of carburetor having but a single spraying nozzle and no automatically operable devices for varying the m mixture proportions.

The invention has for its object to provide a simple and compact carburetor which will be self-regulating for the various engine speeds to produce always a proper mixture 15, and in adequate quantity under the usual throttle control.

To this end, the invention comprises means, in addition to the usual nozzle for delivering raw liquid fuel, for afiording further volge ume of mixed fuel and air eventually to the venturi and discharge portion of the carburetor. This is attained by diverting a portion of the incoming air into the fuel chamber and wherefrom it is removed to mingle with the raw liquid fuel fed through the nozzle of a carburetor as well as with the main volume of the incoming air. I

The nature of the invention, however, will best be understood when described in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which Fig. 1 is avertical section through the improved carburetor.

Fig. 2 is an underneath view of the carburetor with the float chamber and float removed.

Fig. 3 is a transverse section, taken on the line 3-3, Fig. 1, and looking in the direction of the arrows.

Referring-to the drawings, designates the carbureting chamber of the novel carburetor; and to the bottom of which is adapted to be secured in well-known manner the fuel chamber 11 in which is provided the float 12 for controlling the admission and height of the fuel in said chamber. The fuel is delivered thereto in the usual manner thru an inlet13 and from said chamber 11 it is designed to be removed through a spray nozzle 1d of the usual type and having the discharge openings 14. as well as orifice 15 from which fuel is ejected into an axially disposed discharge pipe 16 in which the fuel is more or less 7 atomized and delivered into the Venturi portion 17 surrounding its outer end.

The carburetor chamber 10, furthermore,

is provided with the usual inlet duct 18 for air having the choke valve 18, the bottom of the Venturi portion which surrounds the discharge tube 16 being open to admit the air about said tube for mixing with the outgoing -more or less atomized fuel from the nozzle 14.

The foregoing arrangement is that of more or less well known types of carburetors and no particular claim is made thereto,the invention relating to the provision of means whereby an additional limited supply of a mixture of fuel and air is provided to the carburetor casing and about said tube 16. This supplementary supply then enters the bottom of the venturi with the incoming air, mingling in the upper portion of the carburetor also with the raw more or less gaseous fuel discharged by the said tube 16.

This is efi'ected by providing in the partition wall 20 between the fuel chamber 11 and the carburetor chamber, or rather the wall of the duct portion 18 thereof, a plurality of openings 21. Thereby a portion of the incoming air delivered to the said duct 18 may be drawn into the said fuel chamber, under the suction developed by the internal combustion engine (not shown) and to which the carburetor is adapted to be connected, to mix with the liquid fuel of the said chamber.

Openings 22 through the portion of the wall of the'carburetor casing immediately surrounding tube 16 are provided to admit of this circulation, the air as a result taking up a portion of the fuel from said chamber 11 and the mixture passing outwardly through the openings 22 into the space about said tube 16 and eventually into the venturi and upper portion of the carburetor where the mixture mingles with the more or less raw liquid fuel discharged by tube 16 as well as with the remainder of the incoming air fromduct 18.

1 have found it desirable, also, to assist the introduction of the incoming air to the fuel chamber as by the provision of a suitable bafile or deflecting member 23 which is located transversely of the duct 18 for about one-half of its diameter, although preferably not'extending entirely across the same, and curving toward the incoming air above said openin 21. By this expedient, the tendency of the incoming air to pass directly to the upper portion of the carburetor is to some extent overcome and a portion of the incoming air deflected downwardly toward the said openings 21 through which it is drawn as hereinbefore set forth to mix with fuel of the fuel chamber 11.

In this provision of an additional supply of a mixture of fuel and air, not only is a larger supply of the fuel made available but a mixture of fuel and air is at all times at hand during operation of the engine so that the engine may more promptly respond and a smoother operation thereof be attained. I have found that the fuel consumption, furthermore, is materially reduced by altering the carburetor in the manner hereinbefore set forth, so that not only is more satisfactory action of the engine attained but also a decided saving in the cost'of its operation rendered possible.

It will be noted by reference to the description set forth above, and the drawings, that the nozzle 14 is not vented' that is, the nozzle which delivers fuel from the fuel chamber to the carbureting chamber or to the incoming air current from the air duct, is not vented to the air or atmosphere. In the operat-ion of the carburetor of the present invention, it has been found that it is not necessa to vent the fuel delivering nozzle. Nevert eless highly satisfactory'and markedly improved carburetion is obtained with the carburetor of the present invention.

I claim:

1. A carburetor, comprising a casing affording a carburetin chamber and air supply duct thereto, a uel chamber associated with said carbureting chamber, and means for delivering fuel therefrom into said carbureting chamber, permanently unobstructed communications being provided between the said air duct and fuel chamber and between the latter and the carbureting chamber whereby air is diverted through the vapor space at the fuel chamber so that a mixture of fuel and air will be delivered to said carbureting chamber for mingling with the raw liquid fuel delivered from the fuel chamber.

2. A carburetor, comprising a casing affording a carbureting chamber and an air sup 1y duct thereto, a fuel chamber associate with said carbureting chamber, means for delivering fuel therefrom into said cared communications being provided between the said air duct and fuelchamber and between the latter a'nd the carbureting chamber nications.

whereby a mixture of fuel and air will be delivered to said carbureting chamber for mingling with the raw liquid fuel delivered from the fuel chamber, and means to deflect a portion of the incoming air to said commu- 3. A carburetor, comprising a casing affording a carbureting chamber and an air supply dnctthereto, a fuel chamber associated with said carbureting chamber, means for delivering fuel therefrom into said carbureting chamber, permanently unobstructed communications being provided between the said air duct and fuel chamber and between the latter and the carbureting chamber whereby a mixture of fuel and air will be delivered to said carbureting chamber for mingling with the raw liquid fuel delivered from the fuel chamber, and, a transverse baffle member located in the air duct and curving toward the incoming air above saidcommunications therein, to deflect a portion of the incoming air to said communications.

4. A carburetor, comprising a casing affording a carbureting chamber andan air supply duct thereto, a fuel chamber associated with saidcarbureting chamber, a discharge tube in the carburetor discharging into the carbureting chamber openings about the same for affording permanently unobstructed communication between the carburetor chamber and the fuel chamber, and openings between the said air duct and fuel chamber whereby a mixture of fuel and air will be delivered to said carbureting chamber 100 for mingling with the raw liquid fuel delivered from the fuel chamber.

5. A carburetor comprising a casing providing a carbureting chamber and an air supply duct thereto, a fuel chamber associated m5 with-said carbureting chamber for delivering fuel thereto and means for diverting a portion of the air supply through the vapor space of the fuel chamber prior to passage of such diverted portion of the air supply into the 1m carbureting chamber whereby diverted air takes up vapors from the fuel chamber.

6. In a. carburetor including a carbureting chamber provided with an air inlet duct thereto and a fuel chamber associated with v the air into the vapor space of the uel cham- 19,

ber whereby diverted air takes up vapors from the fuel chamber, and a communication between said vapor space of the fuel chamber and the carbureting chamber for conducting the diverted air carrying vapors into the carbureting chamber. bureting chamber, permanently unobstruct-- 7 A carburetor comprising a casing providmg a carbureting chamber and an air supply duct thereto, a fuel chamber associate with said carbureting chamber, a non- 13o vented nozzle attached to said fuel chamber for delivering fuel to the carbureting chambar, and means for diverting a portion of the air supply) through the vapor space of the fuel cham er prior to passage oi such diverted portion of the air supply into the carbureting chamber, whereby the diverted air takes up vapors from the fuel chamber. c

In testimony whereof I afiix my signature.

GEORGE WAHNISH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2698168 *Oct 25, 1950Dec 28, 1954Gen Motors CorpCarburetor
US2867423 *Apr 23, 1956Jan 6, 1959Gen Motors CorpIdle vent valve
US3290023 *May 18, 1964Dec 6, 1966Chrysler CorpBack bleed choke mixture control
US4254064 *Aug 2, 1979Mar 3, 1981Kohler Co.Carburetor starting mixture control
Classifications
U.S. Classification261/72.1, 261/74, 261/66
International ClassificationF02M5/08, F02M17/00, F02M17/20, F02M5/00
Cooperative ClassificationF02M5/08, F02M17/20
European ClassificationF02M5/08, F02M17/20