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Publication numberUS1818923 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 11, 1931
Filing dateJun 24, 1931
Priority dateJun 24, 1931
Publication numberUS 1818923 A, US 1818923A, US-A-1818923, US1818923 A, US1818923A
InventorsTaylor Harry J
Original AssigneeTaylor Harry J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of applying an advertising medium to bakers' products
US 1818923 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. J. TAYLOR Aug. 11, 1931.

PRODUCTS METHOD OF APPLYING AN ADVERTISING MED IUM TO BAKERS Filed June 24, 1931 WARP/M64140! MQAPP/Nfi ma ATTO R N EY6 Patented Aug. 11, 1931 UNITED STATES HARRY J. TAYLOR, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.

METHOD OF APPLYING AN ADVERTISING MEDIUM TO BAKERS PRODUCTS Application filed June 24,

This invention relates to improvements in labelling various packaged articles and more particularly to bakers products as wrapped for distribution.

,9 It is a desirable thing in connection with such products to impress on the minds of purchasers, other articles produced by the same manufacturers, this being usually accomplished by printing advertising matter directly on the wrapper, or by inserting a loose separate sheet in the package bearing an announcement of the allied goods.

It is quite usual, however, that such wrappers and loose enclosures are removed and thrown away when the goods are to be used, with little or no attention being given the subject matter displayed; hence their advertising value is practically negligible. My experience has shown that the advertising value of advertising matter distributed to purchasers of bakers products is greatly enhanced as com ared with the methods above mentioned 1f it is applied to a band or strip afiixed to the wrapper in such a way that it is not easily detached and consequently overlooked by the person handling or unwrapping the product, and at the same time a contrast is established, either through coloring or otherwise, between the printed matter on the wrapper and the printed matter and other attention-arresting indicia on the band or strip.

For economic reasons it'is essential that this band shall be applied to the product and affixed to the wrapper with a minimum of additional manipulation and labor and, moreover, without interfering with the sealing of the wrapper. It is a common practice to enclose the breadand cake loaves in waxed or paraiiined paper, the same being applied by automatic machinery, which includes means for heating the covering to a degree of temperature to partially melt the substance with which the paper is treated, and when in such softened condition to press the superposed edges and folded ends of the wrapper together, causing adhesion without recourse to extraneous sticky substances.

1931. Serial No. 546,621.

a band, adapted to bear any imprinted legend, to encircle the loaf or other article, either inside or outside the usual wrapper, and a method of applying such band during the wrapping of the bread or other bakers product without introducing an additional mechanical operation.

It is, therefore, an object of the present invention to provide a method of applying the Wrapper and band simultaneously to the article.

A further and prominent feature is to proportion the band with respect to the wrapper so that the former is greater in strength without interfering with the process of wrapping, which is accomplished mechanically in one and the same operation without contact with human hands.

A still further feature of the invention resides in the control of the wrapping and banding operation so that the afiixing of the band to the wrapper is brought about simultaneously with the sealing of the wrapper and without interfering with the complete sealing of the wrapper.

The invention also involves the addition of simple parts to a standard form of wrapping machine whereby the band may be fed in connection with the wrapper automatically and without special attention of the operator.

These advantageous objects are accomplished by the novel and practical process and parts hereinafter described and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, constituting a material component of this disclosure, and in which:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a conventional bread loaf as enclosed in a wrapper, and a band displayed thereover.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged cross sectional View of the same taken through the wrapper and band.

Fig. 3 is a partial side elevational View of a conventional wrapping machine, showing additional elements for applying the band.

Fig. 4 is a similar view to Fig. 1, but showing the band disposed under the wrapper.

Fig. 5 is a cross sectional view of the same.

5 Extensive experimentation has developed Fig. 6 is a View corresponding to Fig. '3,

but showing the arrangement of parts to dispose the band within the wrapper,

In Figs. 1, 2, 4 and 5, a conventional loaf of bread is designated by the numeral 10, completely enclosed in a wrapper 11.

The wrapper is ordinarily made of strong white paper, e. g. 22:5: wrapping stock, 1mpregnated with wax, such as paraffin, colorless,"odorless, moisture, oil and dirt proof, rendering the paper translucent, and, due to the wax, easily adherent upon the application of moderate heat and pressure. 7

Such wrappers are customaril applied in a machine designed specifically or this purpose and not a part of the invention.

These machines, indicated generally by the numeral 12, have at their front ends, brackets 13 in which are loosely mounted shafts 14 carrying the wrapping paper 11 in a continuous roll tobe fed into the machine.

The present invention contemplates the use of an additional bracket 15, as seen in Fig. 3, which may be part of the machine frame, or separate as shown, the bracket carrying a shaft 16 on which a roll of the band or label of similarly treated. but stronger paper 17 is supported, and it is to be noted that the position of the shaft 16 is below that of the shaft carrying the wrapper roll, thus causing the band to overlie the wrapper as seen in Figs. 1 and 2. When it is desired that the band shall be disposed within the wrapper, a roll of stronger paper may be disposed above the wrapper roll as shown, for example, in Fig. 6. The examples illustrated in Figs. 3 and 6 are those that would be employed with certain of the commonly used types of machines. Other machines may require a slightly different disposition of the roll of banding paper but such disposition can be readily effected by one skilled in the art, providing he takes into consideration the particular construction of the wrapping machine, and, bearing this in mind, threads the banding material and the wrapping material in such manner as to bring the band either outside of the wrapper or inside, depending on which arrangement is desired. It is also to be understood that the invention may be applied by means of a wrapping machine in which the folds of the wrapper are formed at the end of the loaf and the band is aflixed lengthwise around the loaf.

The width of the band may be varied over a considerable range as desired but in order to have the most advertising value it is preferable that it shall be relatively narrow as compared with the width or length of the loaf as the case may be. It is important, however, that the band shall be of greater strength per unit of sectional area than the wrapper in order to avoid tearing in the wrapping and banding operation. This greater strength may be provided by appropriate choice of material or by using material of similar quality but of greater thickness. Ordinarily, satisfactory results are obtained when the thickness, or rather the strength per unit of sectional area, is approximately twenty-five to forty per cent greater than that of the wrapper. In general, the strength of the band per unit of sectional area should be increased with decrease in width and the band should not ordinarily be less than one inch wide.

When proper precautions are taken, the band does not interfere in any way with the sealing of the wrapper but, on the contrary, contributes its part in producing a perfectly scaled package. The banding material is waxed or paraiiined in a similar way as the wrapper, and, consequently, when it is fed through the machine with the Wrapper to the wrapping station, severed from the strip and caused in the Wrapping operation to encircle the loaf, its ends are overlapped and brought into interleaved relation with the overlapped portions of the Wrapper as illustrated in Figs. 2 and 5. In this-way the overlapped ends of the band are subJected to the same heating influences as are the overlapped edges of the wrapper at the proper stage in the operation, and the sealing of the band takes place simultaneously with the sealing of the wrapper. Because of the interleaved relation above mentioned, the band is affixed to the wrapper and is prevented from becoming displaced.

The waxing of the band material not only makes for simultaneous sealing of the band and the wrapper in an integral seal and afiixng of the band to the wrapper, but also imparts a certain stiffness to the band material which facilitates its manipulation during the wrapping and banding operation. In some cases, as for example when practising the invention with a wrapping machine that has become somewhat worn in service or where the mechanical operations require that the paper being fed and manipulated shall have a certain stifi'ness, it is desirable to impregnate the banding material with a greater quantity of Wax per unit of surface than is carried by the wrapping pa er.

Ordinarily, these special conditions wil be taken care of when the banding paper isimpregnated with at least 30% more parafiin than is carried by the wrappin paper.

From the foregoing it will e seen that the label carrying band may be disposed either within or upon the wrapper and that no extra mechanism, other than that noted 18 required, while the work is entirely auto matically performed.

Although the improvements have been described with considerable detail and with respect to certain particular forms of the invention, it is not desired to be limited to such details since many changes and modifications may well be' made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention in its broadest aspect.

While the invention has been described with particular reference to the use of paper as the wrapping and banding materials, it will be understood that a fabric or other materials capable of being impregnated with paraffin and manipulated in the manner described may be employed. It is to be further understood that the terms bread and loaf as used in the claims are to be construed as including cake and similar bakers products which a are. wrapped mechanically efore distribution to consumers.

This is in art a continuation of my application Serial No. 517,458, filed February 21, 1931.

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed as new and desired to secure by Letters Patent, is:

. 1. In a process of wrappin bread in which waxed wrapping material 1s fed under tension in continuous strip form, the steps which comprise simultaneously and in contacting relation with one another feeding a strip of such material and a relatively narrow strip of waxed legend-bearing material to a wrapping station, simultaneously enveloping a bread loaf in the wrapping material and applying a portion of sa1d waxed legend-bearing material in the form of a band around the loaf with the ends overlapped at the overlap of the wrapper and in interleaved relation with the overlap ed lportions of the wrap er, and then applying eat to the overlappe portions of said wrapper and band to effect an integralsealing of said overlapped and interleaved portions.

In a process of wrapping bread in which waxed wrapping material is fed under tension in continuous strip form, the steps which comprise simultaneously and in contacting relatlon with one another feed-- ing a strip of such material and a relatively narrow strip of waxed legend-bearing material to a wrapping station, simultaneously enveloping a bread loaf in the wra ping material and applying a portion of said waxed legend-bearing material in the form of a band around the wrapper and loaf with the ends overlapped at the overlap of the wrapper and in, interleaved relatlon with the overlapped ortions of the wrapper, and then applying eat to the overlapped portions of said wrap or and band to effect an integral sealing 0 said overlapped and interleaved portions.

3. In a process of wrapping bread in which waxed wrapping naterial is fed under tension in continuous strip form, the steps which comprise simultaneously and in contacting relation with one another feeding a strip of such material and a relatively narrow strip of waxed legend-bearing material to a wrapping station, said waxed legend-bearing material having a tensile strength per unit of width from 25 to 45% greater than said wrapping material and carrying at least 30% more paraflin per unit of surface than said wrapping material, simultaneously enveloping a bread loaf in the wrapping material and applying a portion of said waxed legendbearing material in the form of a band around the loaf with the ends overlapped at the overla of the wrapper and in interleaved relation with the. overlapping portions of the wrapper and then applying heat to the overlappedportions of said wrap er and band to effect an integral sealing 0 said overlapped and interleaved portions.

In testimony whereof, I have si name to this specification this 23r June, 1931..

ed my day of HARRY J. TAYLOR.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2649672 *May 19, 1950Aug 25, 1953Wingfoot CorpMethod of wrapping in multi-ply material
US6421986 *Oct 12, 2000Jul 23, 2002Dsd Communications, Inc.Method of advertising by distributing targeted promotional materials inside packages of bread
US6584753Aug 13, 2001Jul 1, 2003Dsd Communications, Inc.System and method for including inserts with goods during automated packaging
US6662525Feb 9, 2001Dec 16, 2003Dsd Communications, Inc.System and method for including inserts with goods during automated packaging
US6792737May 22, 2003Sep 21, 2004Dsd Communications, Inc.System and method for including inserts with goods during automated packaging
US6993887Jun 1, 2004Feb 7, 2006Dsd Communications, Inc.System and method for including packets with goods during automated packaging
US7174938Feb 24, 2004Feb 13, 2007Philip Morris Usa Inc.Apparatus for folding and applying onserts onto consumer goods
US8601773 *May 28, 2003Dec 10, 2013Philip Morris Usa Inc.In-line insert folder system
US20040215518 *May 24, 2004Oct 28, 2004Dsd Communications, Inc.System and method for targeted advertising and marketing
US20040242393 *Feb 24, 2004Dec 2, 2004Cadieux Edmond J.Process and apparatus for folding and applying onserts onto consumer goods
Classifications
U.S. Classification53/449, 40/637, 53/463
International ClassificationB65C1/04, B65C1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65C1/04
European ClassificationB65C1/04