Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1819618 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 18, 1931
Filing dateNov 19, 1929
Priority dateMar 22, 1929
Publication numberUS 1819618 A, US 1819618A, US-A-1819618, US1819618 A, US1819618A
InventorsMunters Carl Georg
Original AssigneeMunters Carl Georg
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Device for cleaning, dyeing, drying, and the like
US 1819618 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

g- 1931- c. cs. MUNTERS 1,819,618

DEVICE FOR CLEANING, DYEING, DRYING, AND THE LIKE Filed Nov. 19, 1929 3 Sheets-Sheet l Aug. 18, 1931. c. e. MUNTERS 3 DEVICE. FOR CLEANII IG, DYEING, DRYING, AND TI' XE LIKE Filbd Nov. 19. 1929 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 I if V I I I I 4, mv T lA-ATTORNEY Aug, 18, 1931. c. e, MUNTERS 1,819,613

' DEVICE FOR CLEANING, DYEING DRYING, AND THE LIKE Fi'led Nov. 19, 1929 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 e/JMl/M 1 ATTORNEY Patented Aug. 18, 1931 PATIENT OFFICE CARL GEORGMUN'TEBS, OF STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN DEVICE FOR CLEANING, DYEING, DRYING, AND THE LIKE Application filed November -19, 1929, Serial No. 408,215, and in Sweden March 22, 1929.

My invention contemplates the provision of a new and improved device for cleaning, dyeing and /or drying articles such as fabrics and cleaning and/or drying dishes or the like.

One of the important objects attained is the provision of such a cleaning device in which violent ebullition of the cleaning fluid may take place without the loss, in the form of vapor, of any of the fluid. This is preferably 1 accomplished by the condensation of ,the vapor in the upper part of the device and is of particular value when a fluid is employed, the loss of which it is desired to prevent, or when a solution consisting of two or more liquids is used, the fractional distillation of which would undesirably vary the strength of the solution.

An advantage of my invention lies'in the fact that more or less violent ebullition of the cleaning fluid may be obtained at a temperature below the normal boiling point of the fluid at atmospheric pressure by the maintenance of a partial vacuum in the device.

Further, this vacuum may be maintained without the withdrawal of any of the vapor by means of a vacuum pump or the like. Preferably it is maintained by condensation of the vapor within the device whereby the condensate is returned and revaporized."

A further object of my invention is the provision of means causing a definite circulation of the cleaning fluid without the use of pumps or. moving parts, but preferably through the agency of a thermo-siphon circulator.

A still further advantage of my invention is the incorporation into the device of a suitable filter through Which the cleaning fluid 0 is caused to pass. Thus, much of the dirt removed by the fluid from 111% articles to becleaned, is in turn removed from the former by the filter and the life of the fluid is greatly prolonged. The circulation. through the filter is preferably promoted by a thermo-siphon 'circulator.

Another advantage embodied in my invenparent from the following more or less detailed description. considered in connection with the accompanying drawings, of which: Fig. l is \an elevational view, chiefly in cross-section, of one of the preferred embodiments ofmy invention;

ig. 2 is an elevational View, chiefly in cross-section, of a device similar to that shown in Fig. 1, but embodying a thermo-siphon' circulator and a filter;

Fig. 3 is an elevational view, chiefly in cross-section, of another form of my invention showing a modified circulating means Fig. 4 is an elevational view, chiefly in. cross-section, of a portion of the apparatus shown in any one of the first three views, but embodying a different cooling means;

Fig. 5is an elevational View, chiefly in cross-section, showing a still different arrangement of cooling means;

v Fig. 6 is an elevational view, chiefly in cross-section, of-a modification of my invention adapted for drying materials; 7

'Fig. 7 is an elevational view, chiefly incross-section, of a preferred embodiment of my invention; and

Fig. 8 is an elevational view, chiefly in cross-section, of a slightly modified preferred embodiment of my invention.

Referring more particularly to Fig. 1, ref erence character 10 indicates a metallic con- 90 tainer which is arranged to be heated in any suitable way, as by thegas burner 11. A valve outlet 12 is provided near the bottom of container 10 for the purpose of drawing ofi liquid contained therein. The top of the container is constructed with av flange 13 which retains a packing 1 f. A cover member 15 is arranged to close the top of container 10 with the aid of packing 14 and may be held in place by any suitable clamps, such as those to-waste, such as a sewer.

shown at 16. As will be explained later, the use of these clamps ordinarily is not necessary.

Cover is preferably made in the form of an inverted bowl, across the bottom of which extends a perforated plate 17. A conduit in the form of a coil 18 is placed between the plate 17 and the cover proper. The ends of the conduit forming coil 18 are extended through cover 15 and form an inlet and an outlet for the coil. The inlet is connected to any suitable source of cold water supply while the outlet may be arranged to discharge A valved outlet 19 is provided in the top of cover 15 and controls communication between the interior of container 10 and the atmosphere. A safety valve 20 is also provided in cover 15 in order to prevent excessive pressures existing within the container. 1

The operation of this form of my invention is as follows:

Container 10 is partially filled with any suitable cleaning fluid, such as soap and water, and the articles to be cleaned are introduced therein. Cover 15 is now clamped in place and heat applied to the contents of the container by means of burner 11. Valve 19 is at first open and the vapor formed by the heating of the liquid within the container expels air contained therein through this valve. When substantially all of the air has thus been expelled and steam begins to issue from valve 19, the valve is closed and cooling water is circulated through coil 18. The vapor now formed within the container will be condensed in the upper part thereof by coming in contact with the cold coils 18 and the condensate thus formed will drop back into the main body of the liquid; By proper regulation of the flow of cooling water through coil 18 and of the rate of heating by burner 11, and inasmuch as practically all of the air has been expelled from container 10, a pressure less than atmospheric may be obtained within the container. This will result in a more violent boiling action taking place in the liquid and greater volumes of vapor will thereforebe produced. This has the double advantage of producing greater agitation of the materials to be a cleaned and obtaining this agitation at a lower temperature than would be the case if the boiling took place at atmospheric pressure. Because a partial vacuum exists within container 10 clamps 16 (though desirable) are not absolutely. essential, as the greater pressure of the atmosphere will hold cover 15 securely in place.

Fluid mixtures may be used in the process. I have found that a mixture of water and trichlorethylene is good. The latter liquid begins boiling at about 160 at atmospheric pressure. a

Greater ebullition takes place at the lowthe interior of the container.

steam is 100 cubic feet per pound; while the specific volume at atmospheric pressure, that is to say, at 212 F. is only 27 cubic feet per pound. In the former case therefore, a given amount of heat will produce a steam volume fifteen times as great as in the latter case. This great amount of steam passes through the liquid and consequently also through the goods to be washed whereby a thorough scrubbing and cleaning is obtained. Furthermore the rate of heat radiation is diminished due to the lower temperature. Perforated plate 17 prevents theclothes or other goods to be washedfrom contacting the condenser and hindering condensation. Obviously the process may also be carried out at high pressures and temperatures. This may be desirable for instance, in sterilizing clothesor bottles. The rate of supply of cooling water can be regulated to obtain any desired pressure within the container within a large range; or this may be accomplished by regulating the heat supply as by controlling a valve in the gas supply line to gas burner 11. If there is a low pressure in the container, this can be increased by admitting air through valve 19.

The closing of the evaporation-condensation cycle within a hermetically sealed container is advantageous in preventing escape of vapor. This is particularly advantageous when using a fluid, as in dyeing, which gives off injurious vapors or vapors of unpleasant odor.

By using trichlorethylene in connection with water the partial pressure of the steam may be below atmospheric pressure while the bottom of the container is formed with a pocket 21 extending to a point well within A thermosiphon conduit 22 communicates with the bottom of the container and extends within and through pocket 21 to communicate with the upper central part of the container. The

lower part of thermo-siphon conduit 22 is arranged to be intensely heated by burner 11. An ordinary liquid gauge 23 may be provided in the side of container 10 in order to show the level of the liquid contained therein. A filter member in the form of a tray 24 is removably secured just below the discharge end of thermo-siphon conduit 22 within the upper part of the container. Tray 24 is filled with any suitable filtering material 25, such as steel wool, charcoal or the like, and perforations 26 are formed in the side of the tray.

In operating this form of the invention, cleaning fluid and the articles to be cleaned are placed within container 10, as described in connection with Fig. 1, filter tray 24 and 1 cover are placed in position with valve 19 open and heat is applied by burner 11. The

liquid contained within the lower part of thermo-siphon conduit 22 is heated much more rapidly than is the main body of liquid within the container. Vapor and liquid are expelled from the upper end of conduit 22,

and this vapor tends to expel air within the container through valve 19. Thus it will be seen that the air may be expelled without bringing the entireportion of the cleaning fluid to a boiling point atatmosphericpres sure. When the vapor of the cleaning fluid starts to issue through'valve 19 the valve is closed and cooling water is circulated through coils 18. This 'coolingaction condenses the vapor in the upper part of the con tainer and thus reduces the pressure therein.

This reduced pressure in conjunction with the heat supplied tothe main body of liquid causes the liquid .to boil. The liquid which is ejected from the upper end of thermosiphon conduit 22 is collected in tray 24 and I must pass through the filtering material 25 before returning to the main body of liquid and thus impurities are removed therefrom and the amount of cleaningthat may be accomplished by a given quantity of cleanin fluid is greatlyincreased. It will be seen that in j this modification boiling at a reduced temperature and pressure was obtained without first bringing the entire quantity of cleaning fluid to its boiling point under atmospheric pressure, which was necessary in the device shown in Fig. 1 in order to expel the air. This is of particular advantage in cleaning materials liable to be damaged by a high temperature and also requires less heat.

In Fig. 3 container 10 isshown constructed of corrugated metal in order to give additional strength which is desirable when the interior of thecontainer 15 under a partial vacuum. Cover 15 is preferably similar to the cover shown in connection with Fig. 1. A partition 27 divides the interior of container 10 into two unequai chambers, communication between which exists above and below the partition. A heating member, here shown a.s an electric heating element 28, is provided in the lower part of container 10 and under the smaller compartment as determined by partition 27. p i In the operation ofthis embodiment material to be cleaned and the cleaning fluid are placed in the container and the cover placed thereon and heat applied by'means of heating element'28. The vapor first formed serves to drive the air from thecontainer through valve 19, which is closed after, substantially all of the air has been driven out. The arrangement of heating element 28 beneath-the lower compartment within chamber 10 tends to set up a circulation of liquid upwardly through this compartment anddownwardly through the'larger compartment. This circulation of liquid will carry materials to be cleaned along with it and thus intense agitation of the materials will be obtained without in any way subjecting them to the danger tion to the outside of the cover. The short leg of the l. is'vertical while the long leg is substantially horizontal and. is provided with heat radiating fins 30. A suitable liquid, such as sulphur dioxide, is hermetically sealed within conduit 29 and is under such.

a pressure that it will be in liquid state at the temperature of the surrounding air. When this typeof cover is used in connection with apparatus shown in either Figs. 1, 2 or 3, the vapor formed bythe heating of the cleaning liquid comes in-heat exchange relation with. the sulphur dioxide contained within conduit 29 by means of conduction through cover 15. The sulphur dioxide is thereby vaporized and this vapor passes into the substantially horizontal part of conduit 29 and radiates heat into the atmosphere with the aid of fins 30. The sulphur dioxide is thus condensed and runs back into the vertical leg. The heat removed from vapor within container 10 to cause vaporization'of the sulphur dioxide causes the condensation of the vapor of the cleaning fluid and the condensate returns to the main body of cleaning fluid.

lln Fig. 5 the cooling water coils 18 instead of being arranged incover 15 are placed around the interior of the upper pa'rt of container 10. Perforated plate 17 is in this embodiment formed as a vertical, cylinder leaving an annular space between itself and the wall of container 10 in which coils 18 are placed. Cooling action of the coils in this arrangement is substantially the same as that shown in Fig. 1, 2 or 3..

In Fig. 6 the apparatus shown in Fig. 1

is slightly modified in order that it may be used for drying materials as well as cleaning them. Within container 10 is placed a basketlike structure 31 in which materials suchas dishes or bottles or fabrics to be dried may be placed and held out of contact with the walls of the container in order that they will not be injured by the high temperature at which the wall is maintained. A moisture collecting receptacle 32 is secured beneath the more central part of perforated plate 17 and directly under cooling Water coils 18.

When it is wished to dry materials in this device cleaning liquid is emptied therefrom and a basket 31 inserted within container 10. The articles are then placed within the basket and cover 15 secured in place. Upon the application of heat to the container the liquid held in the materials is driven off in the form of vapor and, cooling water being passed through coils 18, this moisture is condensed thereon. The moisture thus condensed is caught in the collector 32 and does not return to the materials being dried, while at the same time it is not free to escape. Valuable fiuid such as dyeing fluid or hydrocarbon cleaning fluid can thus be recovered.

A basket of this nature may be used in washing when it is convenient in handling the goods to be treated.

In Fig. 7 is shown a preferred embodiment of my invention which is intended to be of a more or less fixed nature, that is to say, permanently connected to a house water system, but this is not necessarily the case. Container 10 is here shown as being partially surrounded by a cylindrical fiue 33 at the bottom of which is placed a gas burner 11. A conduit 34 communicates. with the upper part of flue 33 and serves to lead off the products of combustion. Flue 33 is set within a water heating tank 35 which is supported by suitable legs 36. Cover 15 is here shown either degrees centigrade or Fahrenheit and "a is then diverted through conduit 46.

also has markings thereon indicating preferable temperatures'for cleaning different kinds of materials.

A water supply conduit 37 communicates with the upper part of container 10 and is provided with a valve 38. A conduit 39 communicates with conduit 37, is provided with a.valve 40 and communicates with cooling water coils 18, which are here shown as being. placed around the outside of the upper part of container 10 in'heatexchange relation therewith. An outlet from coils 18 communicates with a nozzle 41 which forms part of an ejector 42- The conduit 43 provided with a valve 44 communicates with the upper part of container 10 and with the suction side of ejector 42. The outlet of ejector 42 discharges into a funnel-like member 45 which, communicates with conduits 46 and 47. Conduit 46 leads to waste while conduit 47 communicates with the interior of water' heating tank35. Conduit 47 is provided with a float valve 48 which is arranged to be closed when the level of liquid within tank 35 approaches the top thereof, and the water A perforated plate. 17 is supported within provided on container 10 so that the level of liquid therein may be maintained just below the perforated plate. A valved outlet 12 is provided at the bottom of container 10 and a similar valve outlet 49 is provided at the bottom of water heating tank 35, while an air vent 5O establishes communication between the top of tank 35 and the atmosphere.

The operation of this form of the device is as follows: The materials to be cleaned are introduced into container 10 and plate 17 and cover 15 are secured in place. Valve 38 in water supply conduit 37 is opened and water is admitted to container 10 until the proper level is obtained as indicated'by water gauge 23. Valve 38 is now closed and valves 40 and 44 are open. The flow of water through nozzle 41 in ejector 42 serves to reduce the pressure in that portion of the ejector which communicates with conduit 43 and thus air is drawn from the interior of container 10 and the pressure therein is reduced. When a sufiicient vacuum has thus been obtained, valve 44 is closed. Burner 11 is now lighted and the heat supplied to the liquid within the container will cause it to boil at a temperature lower than that at which it would boil if atmospheric pressure existed within the container. The vapor formed by the boiling of the liquid will be condensed by being brought in heat exchange relation with cooling water coils 18 and the condensate will be continuously returned to the main body of liquid.

llhe water discharged from coil 18 will be heated somewhat and will pass through funnel 45 and conduit 47 into water heating tank 35 until the tank is substantially filled, whereupon valve 48 will be closed and the water will now pass through conduit 46. Within tank 35 the water will be heated by the hot gases passing through flue 33 and thus a supply of hot water will be on hand. Most of the heat utilized in heating the water within tank 35 would otherwise be wasted in radiation to the atmosphere.

The. device shown in Fig. 8 is similar to that illustrated in Fig. 7 except that a thermo-siphon circulator and filter are included. The arrangement of the pocket 21, thermosiphon conduit 22 and filter tray 24 is similar to that shown in Fig. 2 and additional description here is not deemed .necessary. Likewise the operation is substantially the same, thatis, cleaning fluid is caused to circulate by thermo-siphon action upwardly through conduit 22 and the liquid issuing from the upper end of the conduit is caught rial 25 before returning to the main body of liquid. 7

j Y The purpose of perforated plate 17 shown in tray 24 and passes through filtering matein all of the embodiments is to prevent the materials which are being cleaned from comthe several embodiments of my invention, it

is to be understood that modifications thereof, such as would occur to one skilled in the art, fall within its scope. For instance,

, automatic means, such as a thermostat or a pressure responsive device eflected by conditions within container 10 may be employed to regulate the rate of heating or the OW of cooling water or both. My invention is to be limited only by the appended claims viewed in the light of the prior art.

What liclaim is:

1. A method of treating material such as fabrics to be cleaned which comprises subjecting the material to contact With a body of liquid, heating the liquid to form vapor ot the liquid, condensing the vapor thus formed, returning the condensed liquid to the body of liquid and applying the heat and effecting the condensation at such rates as to produce agitation in the body of liquid.

2. A method of treating articles to be cleaned which comprises subjecting the articles to contact with a body-of liquid, heating the liquid to form vapor of the liquid, con densing the vapor thus tormed, returning the condensed liquid. to the body of liquid and applying the heat and effecting the condensation at such rates as toobtain a pressure above the liquid at a value less than atmospheric.

3. A method of treating articles to be i cleaned which comprises'subjecting the artiapplying the heat and efiecting the. condensa-- cles to contact Witha body of liquid, heating the liquid to form vapor of the liquid, condensing the vapor thus formed, returning the condensed liquid to the body of liquid and tion at such rates as to produce ebullition of the liquid at a temperature below its boiling point at atmospheric pressure.

4. A method of treating articles to be cleaned which comprises subjecting the articles to contact with a body of liquid, heating the liquid to forma vapor of the liquid, removing air' from the neighborhood of the liquid, condensing the vapor thus formed, returning the condensed liquid to the body of liquid and applying the heat and efi'ecting the condensation at such rates as to obtain a pressure above the liquid at a value less than atmospheric.

5. A method of treating articles to be cleaned which comprises subjecting the ma- P neighborhood of the liquid, condensing the.

vapor, returning the condensed liquid to the body of liquid and applying the heat and effecting the condensation at such rates as to obtain a pressure above the liquid at a value less than atmospheric.

6. A method of treating articles to be cleaned which comprises subjecting the articles to contact with a body of liquid, vaporizing a portion of the liquid, utilizing the vapor to circulate remaining liquid, condensing the vapor, returning the condensed liquid to the body of liquid, filtering the circulated liquid and returning the filtered liquid to the body of liquid.

7. A method of treating articles. to be cleaned which comprises subjecting the articles to contact with a body of liquid, heatinga relatively small portion of the liquid to form vapor of the liquid, utilizing the vapor thus formed to expel air from the neighborhood ofthe liquid, condensing the vapor thus formed, returning the condensed liquid to' obtain a pressure less than atmospheric above the liquid and heating the body of liquid sufiiciently to cause ebullition at the reduced pressure. r

8. A method of treating articles -to' be cleaned which com rises subjecting the articles to contact wit a body of liquid, heat ing a relatively small portion of the liquid to form vapor of the liquid, utilizing the vapor thus formed to circulate remaining cleaning fluid and to expel air from the neighborhood of the liquid, condensing the vapor thus formed, returning. the condensed liquid to the body of liquid, filtering the circulated liquid, returning the filtered liquid to the body of liquid, applying heat and effecting ticles to contact with a body of liquid, heating a relatively small portion of the liquid toform vapor of theliqu-id, condensing the vapor thus. formed, returning the condensed liquid to the body of liquid and applying the heat and effecting the condensation at such rates as to produce agitation in the body of liquid. 1

10. A method of treating articles to be cleaned which comprises subjecting the articles to contact with a body of liquid, heating a relatively small portion of the liquid to form vapor of the liquid, utilizing the vaor thus formed to expel air from the neighborhood of the liquid, condensing the vapor thus formed, returning the condensed liquid to the body of liquid, applying the heat andeffecting the condensation at such rates as I to obtain a pressure less than atmospheric ly close said container, means to vaporize cleaning fluid contained therein, means includmg a surface adapted to be cooled to con- 9, dense the vapor within said container, and

means for preventing contact of the agitated material with the cooled surface.

12. In a device for cleaning articles, a container having a space for reception of material to be agitated, means to hermetically close said container, means to vaporize cleaning fluid contained therein, means to obtain a partial vacuum in said container while it is hermetically closed and means to prevent contact of the agitated material with the vacuum producing means.

13. In a device for cleaning articles, a container having a space for reception of material to be agitated, a filter, means for supporting said filter above material in said space,

means comprising athermo-siphon to circulate cleaning fluid within said container and through said filter, a cover hermetically seal ing said container and condensing means within the container above said filter.

14. In a device for cleaning articles, a container, means to eflect boiling of a portion of a body of cleaning fluid contained therein, an outlet for the passage of air expelled from the 3 container by the vapor resulting from the boiling, means to hermetically close said container and means to obtain a partial vacuum in said container while it is hermetically closed.

15. In a device for cleaning articles, a container, means to hermetically close saidcontainer, a thermo-siphon conduit communicating at one end with the lower part of the container and extending-into the more central part thereof, means to heat said container and said thermo-siphon conduit, a perforated plate dividing the interior of said container into a boiling chamber and a condensing chamber, a cooling coil in heat ex- 0 change relation with said condensing chamber and an air valve controlling communication betweenthe interior and exterior of said container.

v 16. In a device for cleaning articles, a container, athermo-siphon conduit communicating with saidcontainer, means to vaporize cleaning fluid within said thermo-siphon conduit, an outlet for the passage of air ex-- pelled from the container by the vapor thus formed, means to hermetically close said container and means to obtain apartial vacuum in said container while it is hermetically closed.

17 In a device for cleaning articles, a container, a perforated member dividing said uid to said boiling chamber and means to control the relative rates of vaporization and condensation so that a pressure less than atmospheric is obtained within said container.

18. In a device for cleaning articles, a container, cleaning fluid circulating means connecting diflerent portions of said container, a heater to effect local boiling of a portion of a body of cleaning fluid contained in said circulating means, means to' hermetically close said container and means in addition to said heater to eflect boiling throughout the entire body of cleaning fluid.

19. In a device for cleaning articles, a container, thermo-siphon means comprising a heater to effect boiling of a portion of a body of cleaning fluid contained therein, means to hermetically close said container and means to condense the vapor resulting from the boiling whereby a partial vacuum is obtained and boiling of the entire body of liquid results.

20. In adevice for cleaning articles, a container, means to hermetically close said container, means comprising a heater to cause cleaning fluid within said container to boil, means to discharge air from the container due to vapor produced by the boiling and means to produce a partial vacuum in said container while it is hermetically closed.

21. In a device for cleaning articles, a container, thermo-siphonm'eans to effect boiling of a portion of a body of cleaning fluid con- 105 tained therein, means to hermetically close said container and means to produce a partial vacuum in said container while it is hermetically closed.

22, In a device for cleaning articles, a container, means to hermetically-close said container, means to heat said container to vaporize cleaning fluid contained therein, means to discharge air from said container due to vapor formed therein and meansto condense the vapor within said container.

23. In a device for cleaning articles, a container, means to hermetically close said. container, means to heat said container to vaporize cleaning fluid contained therein, means 129 to discharge air from said container due to vapor formed therein and means to produce a partial vacuum in said container whileit is hermetically closed.

24:. In a device for cleaning articles, a container, a perforated member dividing said container into a relatively large boiling chamber for containing material to be cleaned and cleaning fluid and a relatively small condensing chamber, means to vaporize cleaning fluid in said boiling chamber, means to condense the vapor thus formed in the condensing chamber, means to return the condensed liquid. to said boiling chamber and" means to control the relative rates of vaporization and condensation so that ebullition occurs in the liquid in said boilng chamber at a temperature below its boiling point at atmospheric pressure.-

25. In a device for cleaning articles, a'container, means to hermetically close said container,a gas burner arranged to heat said container, an annular flue around the lower part of said container, a water heating tank around said flue, a cooling water conduit in 1 heat exchange relation with the upper part of said container and a connection between said cooling water conduit and said water heating tank.. I

26. In a device for cleaning articles, a container, means to hermetically close said container, a perforated plate dividing said container into a boiling chamber and a condensing chamber, a gas burner arranged to heat said boiling chamber, an annular flue around saidboiling chamber, a water heating tank around said flue, a cooling water conduit in heat exchange relation with said condensing chamber and a connection between said cooling waterconduit and said, water heating tank.

27. In a device for cleaning articles, a container, means to hermetically close said container, a gas burner arranged to cause vaporization of cleaning fluid within said container, an annular flue around a portion of said container, a water heater tank around 'said flue, means comprisinga cooling water conduit to efl'ect condensation of vapor in the upper part of said container'and a connection between said cooling water conduit and said water heating .tank.

28. In a device for cleaning articles, a container, means to hermetically close said container, a gas burner arrangedto causevaporization of cleaningfluid within said contamer, an annular flue around a portion of said container, a water heating tank around said flue, means comprising a cooling water conduit to effect condensation of vapor in the upper part of said container, a connection'between said cooling water conduit and.

said water heating tank and means regulating the relative rates of vaporization and condensation so as to obtain a partial vacuum in said container.

29. In a device for cleaning articles, a container. means to hermetically close said container, a valved conduit for supplying cleaning fluid to said container, a perforated plate dividing said container into a boiling and a condensing chamber, a cooling water conduit in heatexchange relation with said condensing chamber, a gas burner arranged to heat said boiling chamber, an annular flue around said boiling chamber for the passage of products of combustion, an annular water heating tank around said flue, means to obtain a partial vacuum within said container comprising an ejector communicating with the interior of said container through a valved conduit, a connection'between said cooling water coil and said ejector, a connection between'the outlet of said ejector and said water heating tank and a valved outlet from said water heating tank.

30. A method of treating material such as fabrics to be cleaned which comprises submerging the material in a body of liquid, heating the liquid to-form vapor of the liquid, condensing the vapor above and in the vicinity of the body of liquid, returning the condensed liquid to the body of liquid -and applying the heat and effecting the con densation at such rates as to produce a partial vacuum above the surface of the body of liquid and agitation in the body of liquid.

31. In a device for cleaning articles, a container, means to hermetically close said con- .tainer,- a partition within said container forming communicating chambers 011 each side of said partition adapted to hold liquid and means to cause agitation of the liquid and produce different levels of liquid in the chambers comprising condensing means above the liquid in the container and means to heat the chambers unequally.

32. In a device for cleaning articles, a container, means to hermetically close said container, a partition within said container forming communicating chambers on each side of said partition adapted to contain liquid, condensing means above the liquid in the container and heating means forthe container, said heating'means being arranged in one of said chambers to produce different levels of liquid in the chambers and to cause agitation of the liquids.

33. In a device for cleaning articles, a container, a partition within said container forming communicating chambers on each side of said partition adapted to contain liquid, means for heating the liquid, condensing means in said container for condensing vapors formed by heating the liquid 1n one of said chambers, and means for removing air therefrom, the arrangement being such that the removal of air and the heatlng of the liquid and the condensation of the vapor produce agitation and variat on of liquid level between the chambers. Q

In testimony whereof I hereunto afiix my signature.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2593640 *Oct 8, 1946Apr 22, 1952Paul E WhittingtonApparatus for fluid treatment of textiles and clothing
US2685790 *Jun 2, 1948Aug 10, 1954Brennan Charles JWash boiler
US3454189 *Aug 17, 1966Jul 8, 1969Sybron CorpMaterial handling container
US3593729 *Jul 29, 1968Jul 20, 1971Goldware DavidVapor degreaser
US4070289 *Feb 23, 1976Jan 24, 1978Alaeddin AkcasuPreparation of pyrogen-free water
US6428627 *Mar 15, 2000Aug 6, 2002Hatco CorporationFlow heater
Classifications
U.S. Classification68/193, 68/18.00R, 134/35, 134/30, 134/31, 68/191
International ClassificationD06F39/00
Cooperative ClassificationD06F39/00
European ClassificationD06F39/00