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Publication numberUS1821988 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 8, 1931
Filing dateJan 2, 1926
Priority dateJan 2, 1926
Publication numberUS 1821988 A, US 1821988A, US-A-1821988, US1821988 A, US1821988A
InventorsRobert R Rowles
Original AssigneeRobert R Rowles
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carburetor
US 1821988 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 8, 1931. R. R. ROWLES 1,821,988

CARBURETOR Filed Jan. 2, 192

Fi I

ll 9 v 55 If. Q 20 89 A- M Z6 42 Patented gept. 8,

UNITED. STATES ROBERT 'R. ROWLES, OF GOODHUE, MINNESOTA CARBURETOR Application filed January 2, 1926. Serial No; 78,757.

My invention relates to improvements in carburetors for internal combustion engines and particularly to the type of carburetors employing a main air passageway and an 6 auxiliary passageway supplied with heated An object of this invention resides in providing a valve for controlling the flow of air through said auxiliary air passageway 10 together with a retarding mechanism for retarding the opening of said valve.

Another object of this invention resides in constructing said retarding mechanism with a pair of inter-connected bellows, one of said bellows being directly connected to said valve and being adapted to be collapsed upon the opening of said valve, said bellows being connected by a constricted passageway and containing a fluid adapted to pass from one to the other through said passage way upon movement of said valve.

A still further object resides in positioning said bellows within the auxiliary passageway so as to permit the same to come 5 in contact with the heated air passing therethrough and to fill the same with" a liquid, the, viscosity of which is such as to cause a more sluggish movement of the liquid from one bellows to the other, when the carburetor is cold than when it is operating under normal conditions.

A still further object of this invention resides in providing means for adjusting the constriction within said passageway so as to Fig. 1 is a vertical, sectional. view ofa 4 invention. H

Fig. 2 is an enlarged, sectional view of a portion of the structure shown in Fig. 1.

In the type of carburetor employing a main air passageway and an auxiliary air vary the time required in transferring the carburetor illustratingan embodiment of my passageway, with the needle valve adjusted for normal running conditions, it is fre quently found that upon accelerating the en-. gme from idling speeds that insuflicient fuel is drawn intothe fuel mixtureto give the engine the required pick-up. In my improved carburetor, an auxiliar airvalve is employed through which additlonal air may be injected into the fuel mixture. This valve is retarded in opening by means-of a retarding mechanism so that upon opening the throttle of the carburetor the purpose for speeding up the engine from idling speeds, said valve opens slowly enough, to permit a rich fuel mixture to be drawn in through the main air passageway giving the engine the necessary im etus to bring it up to running speed. This has the efiiectiof eliminating the spitting and sputtering which otherwise occurs when the throttle is rapidly opened as above described,

For the purpose of illustratim my inven;

Fig. 1,- a cartion, I have shown in detail in buretor which is readily adapted to receive the auxiliary air valve and retarding mocha-- nism of my invention though it can be understood that the same maybe equally as well installed and used with other types and forms of carburetors; prises primarily a casing A providing. a. central float chamber 10, for the reception of the fuel for the en ine. her is an annular fIoat. 11,'actu ating a valve mechanism 12, for thepurpose of maintaining the fuel within said chamber at a fixed level. ber 10, through a fuel pipe 13, which is connected .witha nipple 14 forming a portion of the valve mechanism 12.

In the center of the casing A is positioned the fuel vaporizing structure B of the carb'uretor, which comprises three concentrically' situated conduits 15, l6and 17 providing two passageways 19 and 20. The outer conduit 15 forms the inner wall of the fuel chamber 10.

Along the bottom of the carburetor is provided an air passageway 18 which is arranged to communicate with the passageway 19 extending through the inulti-duct This carburetor com-' \Vithin this cham- The fuel is conducted to the chamstructure B. A similar passageway 21 is formed at the top of the carburetor which communicates with the passageway 20 between conduits 17, 16. The passageway 20 communicates with the outer air by means of conduit 16 which extends through the bottom of the carburetor, while the upper portion of passageway 19 similarly communi-- cates with the outer air through a passageway indicated at 22 having a number of ports 23 leading therethrough, which pass directly through the walls of the casing. To one side' of the fuel chamber 10, is formed a mixing chamber 24 which communicates with both of the passageways 18 and 21.

The various conduits 15, 16 and 17 are held in proper relation by means of radial bridge elements 25 which are preferably cast integral with said conduits. These brid e elements have passageways 27 therein w ich are for the purpose of conducting.

passes alongthe passageway 20 and picks up vaporized fuel from the conduit 17 through port holes 29, formed in the upper portion of the same and forms therewith an enriched fuel mixture. The fuel mixture thus formed passes through passageway 21 and through a mixing screen 30, then into mixing chamber 24 where it is further mixed with additional air. The secondary air enters the carburetor through the ports 23 passing through chamber 22 along passageway 19 and into the passageway.18 where it is conducted to the mixing chamber 24 and mixed. with the fuel mixture discharged into the same through screen 30." The conduit 16 being heated by the heated air passing along the same in turn conducts the heat to the secondary air so that the air entering passagewa 18 is also heated. The fuel mixture is wit drawn from the carburetor through a discharge 31 which may be connected with the.intake manifold of an engine in the usual manner, the volume of the mixture being controllable through the usual throttle valve .32. v

For re lating the flow of air through the auxiliary passageway 18 and into the mixing chamber. 24, I employ a valve 33 which is fitted on a valve seat 34 formed in casing A. This valve is connected to' the lower of two metal bellows 35=and 36 which are supported on an arm 37 secured to the casing proper. The construction of this mechanism is best shown in Fig. 2. .The support 37 has a threaded stem 38 which passes through casing A and is held supported thereon by means of a shoulder 39 formed on said support and a nut 40 screwed upon said stem. Support 37 has attached to it, the two metallic bellows 35 and 36 which are constructed in the usual manner and are adapted to be extended or collapsed upon applying pressureto the ends thereof. The lower bellows 36 is closed at its lower end by means of a flange 41 which has attached thereto, a valve stem 42 supporting the valve 33. The bellows 35 is closed at its upper end by means of a filler neck 43 in which is threaded a screw 44 serving as a closure for the same. The two bellows 35 and 36 communicate with one another through a passageway 45 extending through the support 37 which passageway may be constricted by means of a needle valve 46 threaded into saidsupport, adaptedto open and close passageway 45 as said valve is turned. A thumb wheel 48 secured upon end of valve 46 facilitates rotation thereof for the purpose of adjusting the constriction of passageway 45. By removing the filler cap 44 the interior of both of' the bellows 35 and 3.6 may be filled with some suitable fluid such as a paraflin oil, the viscosity of which is such as to cause a sluggish movement of the oil through passageway 45- when the-carburetor is cold and which flows quite readily through the same when the carburetor becomes heated and functions in the normal manner. The bellows 36 is constructed of a resilient ma-' terial so that the same exerts downward pressure on valve 33 to hold it closed. This pressure may be adjusted by turning said valve upon the stem 42 which is threaded to receive it, said valve being held in fixed position on said stem by means of a lock-nut 50. When air is drawn into chamber 24 past the valve 33 through the suction of the engine, the bellows 36 is collapsed which causes the fluid therein to be expelled through the passageway 45 and to be forced into the bellows 35 which expands under the pressure of the fluid to receive it. By regulating the constriction in this passageway the time required for-the expulsion of the fluid can be controlled as desired. When the suction of the engine decreases sufficiently, the resiliency of the two bellows 35 and 36 causes the fluid forced into bellows 35 to flow back again into the bellows 36 with the consequent closing of valve 33 upon its seat 34.

The valve 33 and the needle valve 28 are first adjusted to permit the valve 33 to open the required amount to secure the proper fuel mixture when the engine is running under load. The spindle 46 is next adjusted to vary the constriction in the passageway 45 so that valve 33 is sufficiently retarded upon opening throttle 32 to secure the relot quired enriched fuel mixture as previously brought out. In this manner the carburetor functions to provide an enriched fuel mixture to give ample power for pick-up and, when the engine gains speed, to supply a leaner mixture suitable for normal conditions, thereby causing the engine to perform in an eflicient manner and with economy of fuel consumption. \Vith a liquid in the bellows 35 and 36 having appropriate viscosity, the carburetor is caused to furnish a fuel mixture relatively greatly enriched until the engine and carburetor become heated. As soon as such liquid becomes warm the valve then functions normally as previously explained.

My improved carburetor is exceedingly simple and is automatic and positive in operation. The fuel mixture is at all times maintained of the proper riclmess so as to cause the engine to perform in a highly efficient and serviceable manner with economy of fuel consumption. The valve retarding mechanism will not readily get out of order and after having been once adjusted will not require further attention.

(hanges in the specific form of my invention, as herein disclosed, may be made within the scope of what is claimed without departing from the spirit of my invention.

I claim:

1. In a carburetor having a passageway for air. a valve for yieldingly obstructing and controlling the passage of air through said passageway, opposed resilient bellows, a support for said bellows forming a re stricted passageway thcrebetween, said valve being connected with one of said bellows.

2. In a carburetor having a passageway for air, a valve for yieldingly obstructing and controlling the passage of air through said passageway, opposed resilient bellows, a support for said bellows forming a passageway therebetween, said valve being connected with one of said bellows and means for adjustably restricting said passageway.

2;. In a carburetor having a passageway for air. a valve for yieldingly obstructing and controlling the passage of air through said passageway, opposed resilient bellows, a support for said bellows forming a passageway thercbetwwn, said valve being ad jllstably connectml with one of said bellows and means for adjustably restricting said passageway.

4. In a carburetor having a passageway for air. a valve for yieldingly obstructing and controlling the passage of air through said passageway. opposed resilient bellows, a support for said bellows forming a restricted passageway therebetween, said valve being connected with one of said bellows and said other bellows being free to expand upon the reception of fluid from said first named bellows.

5. In a carburetor having a passageway for air, a valve for yieldingly obstructing and controlling the passage of air through said passageway, opposed resilient bellows, a support for said bellows forming a restricted passageway thcrebetween, said valve being connected with one of said bellows, said bellows being bodily inclosed within l passageway and coming in direct contact with the air passing therethrough.

6. In a -arbnretor having a passageway for air, a valve for yieldingly obstructing and controlling the passage of air through said passageway. opposed resilient bellows, a support for said bellows connecting the same and providing a restricted passageway therebetwta n, said valve being mounted upon and carried by one of said bellows, the resiliency of said bellows serving to normally maintain said valve closed. both of said bellows being bodily enclosed within said passageway and coming in direct contact with the air passing therethrough. said bellows being adapted to receive a fiuid of a. viscosity such that the passage thereof through said restrict-cd passageway will be more sluggish while the air passing through said air passageway is cold than when the said air is relatively warmer.

7. In combination, a carburetor having an air passageway, a valve for regulating the flow of air therethrough, a bellows connected with said valve and containing a fluid adapted to be expelled therefrom on the opening of said. valve, a second bellows for the reception of said expelled fluid, and means forming a restricted passageway connecting said bellows for retarding the transfer of fluid from one bellows to the other.

8. In combination. a carburetor having an air passageway, a valve for regulating the flow of air therethrough, a bellows connected with said valve and containing a fluid adapted to be expelled therefrom on the opening of said valve, a second bellows for the reception of said expelled fluid, and means forming a restricted passageway connecting said bellows for retarding the transfer of fluid from one bellows to the other, the viscosity of said liquid being such as to cause a sluggish expulsion of the liquid from said chamber when the carburetor is cold. I

9. In a valve, a casing formed to provide an inlet, an outlet, and a seat thcrebetween, a collapsible and distensible member, a valve carried by said member and adapted to close on said seat, and a second collapsible and distensible member, communication between the interiors of said collapsible and distensible members being established through an aperture;

10. In a valve, a casing formed to provide an inlet, an outlet, and a seat therebe- I a u a tween, a collapslble and d1stens1b1e memher, a valve carried by said member and adapted to close on said seat, and a second collapsible and distensible member, communication between the interiors of said collapsible and distensible members being established through a controllable aperture.

11. Valve operating means comprising a support, a bellows carried on each side of saidsupport, and a valve carried by one of said bellows, said support being formed with an adjustable opening therethrough providing communication between the interiors of said respective bellows.

12. Valve operating means comprising a support, a bellows carried on each side of said support, and a valve carried by one of said bellows, said support being formed with an adjustable opening therethrough providing communication between the interiors of said respective bellows, the interiors of said two bellows comprising a single, completely closed chamber.

13. Valve operating means comprising a support, a bellows carried on each side of said support, and a valve carried by one of said bellows, saidsupport being formed with an adjustable opening. therethrough providing communication between the interiors of said respective bellows, whereby a single, completely closed chamber of invariable volume capacity is formed by said two bellows.

In testimony whereof I have afiixed my signature.

ROBERT R. ROWLES.

Lamas

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2416570 *Dec 2, 1942Feb 25, 1947Coleman Roy FForce system
US2522411 *Sep 24, 1943Sep 12, 1950Honeywell Regulator CoControl device
US2552479 *Nov 5, 1943May 8, 1951Coea Cola CompanyValve
US2590324 *Mar 28, 1944Mar 25, 1952Barton JonesTemperature compensated means for measuring differential pressures
US2637338 *Aug 25, 1947May 5, 1953Jean TroendleShutoff valve
US2694469 *May 7, 1951Nov 16, 1954Peck Edward FDashpot for weighing scales and the like
US3819219 *Nov 22, 1972Jun 25, 1974Mcneil CorpCollision energy absorber
US5704596 *Jan 17, 1997Jan 6, 1998Bell HelicopterVibration isolation system
US6082508 *Apr 23, 1997Jul 4, 2000Honeywell International Inc.Pneumatic damping strut
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/514, 137/547, 137/904, 137/434, 261/38, 261/161, 137/529, 137/481, 261/70, 261/39.2, 261/16, 188/298, 261/39.3
International ClassificationF02M23/10
Cooperative ClassificationF02M23/10, Y02T10/146, Y10S137/904
European ClassificationF02M23/10