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Publication numberUS1822087 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 8, 1931
Filing dateApr 25, 1929
Priority dateApr 25, 1929
Publication numberUS 1822087 A, US 1822087A, US-A-1822087, US1822087 A, US1822087A
InventorsBernard Feingold
Original AssigneeBernard Feingold
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dish drainer
US 1822087 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 8, 1931. a. FEI'NGOLD 1,822,087

DISH DRAINER Filed April 25, 1929 INVENTOR. BYfi /n/M/ Q A TTORNEY Patented Sept. 8, 1931 UNITED STATES BERNARD FEINGOLD,

OF NEW YORK, N; Y.

DISH DRAINER,

Application filed April 25,

This invention relates to dish drainers. The drainer according to this invention is so constructed that it automatically adjusts itself to different sizes of dishes. It opens up to accommodate the larger dishes and can be folded up when not in use.

These and other objects will become apparent upon a further study of the description and drawings in which Fig. 1 is a plan view of the drainer, Fig. 2' is a section of the drainer taken along the line 22 of Fig. 1 showing the drainer in open position to accommodate the smaller dishes, the dotted line indicating a portion of a small dish in supported position, Fig. 3 is a partial section taken also along the line 2-2 of Fig. 1 but showing the drainer in a wider open position to accommodate the larger dishes, the dotted line indicating a portion of a large dish, and Fig. 4 is a section also along line 2-2 but showing the drainer in folded position.

The drainer consists essentially of two oppositely disposed pivotally mounted wire 5 rack frames. Each of these rack frames has a heavy lower bar 5 and a somewhat lighter U shaped bar 6 having its arms 7 fastened to bar 5 near its ends. Intermediate of the arms 7 are a plurality of still lighter bent cross bars 8 having one end fastened to bar 5 and the other end to bar 6. The arms 7 which are in effect end cross bars of their corresponding rack frame, are bent similarly to bars 8. The ends of bar 5 for one rack frame are pivotally mounted in supporting plates 9, while the ends of bar 5 for the other frame are pivotally mounted in supporting plates 10. Each pair of plates 9 and 10 are pivotally connected to each other by means of a rivet 11. Each plate 9 has an outer supporting leg 12 and an inner supporting leg 13', while each plate 10 has an outer supporting leg 14 and an 4 inner supporting leg 15. The upper edge E of each plate 9 is provided with a lug 16 projecting laterally into the path of its adj acent arm 7 as said arm is swung with the rest of its frame from its inner position outward. In a similar manner plates 10 are provided with lugs 17 which project bend is a very useful feature.

1929. Serial No. 357,933.

into the paths of their adjacent arms 7.

Each arm.'?' is provided with an inwardly projecting bent wire guard 18 fastened to it.

For holding the smaller dishes, one of which is indicated in part by the numeral 19, Fig. 2, the supporting plates 9 and 10 have their legs 12, 13, 14 and 15 in contact with the supporting surface upon which. the drainer stands. from rotating outwardly by lugs 16 and lZ.

For holding the larger dishes, one of which is indicated in part by the numeral 20, Fig. 3, bars 6 are rotated away from each other, which causes arms 7 to press against lugs 16 and 17, thereby raising legs 13 and 15 from the supporting surface, resulting in the drainer being supported only by legs 12 and 14 of the supporting plates. The weight of the dishes and their frictional contact with the inner side of bars 6 holds the drainer in open position.

Guards 18 at the end of the rack frames (Fig. 1), are provided to prevent cups or other rounded utensils from falling out the drainer at the ends. Cross bars 8- have abend in them, so that they extend from-bars 6 inwardly and then bend downwardly to their connection with lower bars 5. The It permits upper bars 6 to be separated widely for large dishes, while cross bars 8 remain close enough together to hold up smaller dishes between them. i

In order to'fold the drainer when not in use, bars 6 are brought towards each other and each pair of supporting plates 9 and 10 are'turned down towards each other bringing their legs 12 and 14 together as shown in Fig. t. Although bars 8 and arms 7 are shown on line opposite each other in Fig. 1, the rack frames can fold into each other as shown in Fig. 1, because of the play at the pivotal connections between bars 5 and plates 9 and 10. Instead. of taking into account this play, the bars 8 and arms f their respective frames can be offset on their respective bars 5 so as to clear each other when the drainer is folded.

I claim 1. A dish drainer comprising a pair of The rack frames'are held Y oppositely disposed rack frames, each frame comprising an upper and lower bar connected to each other by a plurality of cross bars spaced at intervals along the length of the frames, and supporting means for each frame, the supporting means for one frame being pivotally connected to the supporting means of the other, said lower bars being pivotally mounted upon their corresponding supporting means on opposite sides of the pivotal connection of the supporting means.

2. A dish drainer comprising a pair of oppositely disposed rack frames, each frame comprising an upper and lower bar connected to each other by a plurality of cross bars spaced at intervals along the length of the frames, said cross 'bars having a bend in them causing said bars to extend from the upper bar inwardly and then downwardly, and supporting means upon which the lower bar of each frame is pivotally mounted, the bend of the cross bars of one frame passing below the upper bar of the other frame when said frames are folded together about their pivotal axes.

3. A dish drainer comprising a pair of oppositely disposed rack frames, a support for each frame near each end thereof upon which the frame is pivotally mounted substantially at its bottom, the supports of one frame being pivotallyconnected to the supports of the other, the pivotal axes of said frames and supports being substantially parallel to each other and the pivotal axes of said frames being located on said supports on opposite sides of the pivotal connections of said supports, and laterally projecting lugs upon said supports projecting in the path of said frames when said frames are swung outwardly, whereby swinging said frames outwardly raises the pivotal connections of the supports.

*4. A dish drainer comprising a pair of oppositely disposed rack frames, a support for each frame upon which its correspond ing frame is pivotally mounted, said supports being pivotally connected to each other, the pivotal axes of said frames and supports being substantially parallel to each other, the pivotal axes of said frames being located on said supports on opposite sides of the pivotal connection of said supports, and laterally projecting lugs carried by the upper part of said supports and located outside of and above the pivotal axes of said frames,-said lugs projecting into the path of said frames when said frames are swung away from each other.

5. A dish drainer comprising a pair of oppositely disposed rack frames, and a sup port for each frame near each end thereof upon which the frame is pivotally mounted, the supports of one frame being pivotally connected to the supports of the other, the pivotal axes of-sa-id frames and supports being substantially parallel to each other, the pivotal axes of said frames being located on said supports on opposite sides of the pivotal connections of said supports, each support comprising an outer and inner leg adapted to contact with the surface upon which the drainer stands when the drainer holds small dishes, said inner legs being raised from said surface when said frames are swung outward for holding large dishes. '6. A' .dis'h drainer .as claimed in claim 1 comprising guards on the end cross bars, the guards on the end cross bars of one frame projecting inwardly toward the guards on the end cross bars of the other frame.

BERNARD .F-EIN GOLD.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2600755 *Apr 29, 1948Jun 17, 1952Greensfelder Elmer LCover rack
US3486631 *Sep 29, 1967Dec 30, 1969John T Shaler CoBasket for polished wafers
US4606464 *Jan 17, 1985Aug 19, 1986The Maytag CompanyDishwasher rack with pivoted divider assembly
US4666110 *Nov 20, 1985May 19, 1987Prouty Deane LCollapsible holder for crash cymbals
US4969560 *Aug 24, 1989Nov 13, 1990John StanfieldPortable dish rack
US5158185 *Sep 27, 1991Oct 27, 1992Maytag CorporationDividers for dishwasher racking system
US5205419 *Jul 29, 1992Apr 27, 1993Maytag CorporationDishwasher racking system
US6357605 *May 11, 2000Mar 19, 2002Rudolph MartorellaDevice for drying objects
US6502704 *Jan 9, 2001Jan 7, 2003Rudolph MartorellaDevice for drying objects
US6516956 *Mar 4, 2002Feb 11, 2003Rudolph MartorellaDevice for drying objects
US7407059Dec 13, 2005Aug 5, 2008Helen Of Troy LimitedDrying storage rack
US7475785 *Nov 28, 2006Jan 13, 2009Kidd Phyllis AFoldable drying rack for plastic bags
US8356719 *Mar 23, 2009Jan 22, 2013Bsh Bosch Und Siemens Hausgeraete GmbhCrockery basket and dishwasher
US8844733 *Jul 19, 2013Sep 30, 2014Isaac WaksulPlate stand
US20110025179 *Mar 23, 2009Feb 3, 2011Bsh Bosch Und Siemens Hausgerate GmbhCrockery basket and dishwasher
US20110108682 *Nov 10, 2009May 12, 2011Boaz Ginger KBag holding rack for use in conventional dishwashing machine
US20140102998 *Jul 19, 2013Apr 17, 2014Isaac WaksulPlate stand
USRE43349 *Jul 11, 2001May 8, 2012Grace C. Petterson, legal representativeBottle rack
Classifications
U.S. Classification211/198, 211/41.5
International ClassificationA47L19/04, A47L19/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47L19/04
European ClassificationA47L19/04