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Publication numberUS1822416 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 8, 1931
Filing dateSep 26, 1929
Priority dateSep 26, 1929
Publication numberUS 1822416 A, US 1822416A, US-A-1822416, US1822416 A, US1822416A
InventorsFrederick C Nonamaker
Original AssigneeFurness Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Art of delustering artificial silk
US 1822416 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented Sept. 8, 1931 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE FRIE'ID EIRIICK C. NONAMAKER, OF GLOUCESTER CITY, NEW JERSEY, ASSIGNOR T FUR- NESS CORPORATION, OF PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA, A CORPORATION OF NEW JERSEY ART OF DELUSTERING ARTIFICIAL SILK I No Drawing.

This invention relates to the delustering of artificial silk. 7

In carrying out my invention I employ a cellulose compound having a different index of refraction from that of the cellulose in the finished thread itself, this cellulose compound being applied in ground or pulverized form. The ground material may be cellulose, cellulose esters or an intermediate com- IL pound, kapok or other suitable cellulose bearing material. hydro-cellulose, oxycellulose and the like may be used. It is mixed in the cellulose solution from which the thread is spun, the w mixture being preferably homogeneous. The cellulose solution, after preparation. has no dissolving power on the ground cellulose and it is not affected. There is thus dispersed throughout the cellulose solution, and, e

to therefore, throughout the precipitated filaments of the thread, innumerable infinitesimal particles of cellulose of a different index of refraction. This has the eflect of increasing the opacity of the thread and its cover ing power.

As a specific example, I may employ cotton linters moistened with about a one-half percent hydrochloric acid solution. The linters so moistened are then dried substan- W tially completely, the drying driving off the acid and leaving hydro-cellulose. Hydrocellulose is extremely brittle so that it can I be ground to a very fine state of division sufli cient to permit of its introduction into the r cellulose solution and of the spinning of such mixture through the spinnerets.

I claim 1. The herein described process which con- Modified cellulose, such as Application filed September 26, 1929. Serial No. 395,477.

solution and heating the moistened linters to drive off the acid and to dry the same, in grinding the so dried linters, in mixing the ground material in a cellulose solution, and in spinning the thread therefrom.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto signed my name.

FREDERICK C. NONAMAKER.

sists in mixing a cellulose solution with fine 40 ground cellulose particles having a different index of refraction from the cellulose of the thread, and in spinning the thread from the mixture.

2. The herein described process which comprises moistening cotton linters with an acid

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2443918 *Jun 25, 1945Jun 22, 1948Rhone Poulenc SaLight-diffusing cellulose acetate compositions
US4391973 *Aug 17, 1981Jul 5, 1983Morca, Inc.Readily hydratable cellulose and preparation thereof
US4762564 *Mar 13, 1987Aug 9, 1988Teepak, Inc.Reinforced cellulose aminomethanate
US5215125 *Jan 26, 1989Jun 1, 1993Teepak, Inc.Cellulose aminomethanate sausage casings
US5295514 *Nov 18, 1988Mar 22, 1994Teepak, Iinc.Cellulose aminomethanate sausage casings
Classifications
U.S. Classification106/163.1, 536/56
International ClassificationC08L1/00
Cooperative ClassificationC08L1/00
European ClassificationC08L1/00