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Publication numberUS1823829 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 15, 1931
Filing dateNov 23, 1926
Priority dateNov 23, 1926
Publication numberUS 1823829 A, US 1823829A, US-A-1823829, US1823829 A, US1823829A
InventorsJones Laban E, Nadeau Albert N
Original AssigneeJones Laban E, Nadeau Albert N
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coin-handling apparatus
US 1823829 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Se t. 15, 1931. E. JONES ET AL 1,823,829

COIN HANDLING APPARATUS Filed Nov. 25, 1926 3 Sheets-Sheet l llllllli .23 1% Ma r 85% I W 71. wi Z:

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Sept. 15, 1931. E. JONES E T AL 1,823,829

' com HANDLING APPARATUS 1 Filed Nov. 23, 1926 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 I I I l I June-"104,:

(Mug W W W M W W mma Sept. 15, 1931.

L. E. JONES ET AL 1,823,829

COIN HANDLING APPARATUS Filed Nov. 23, 1926 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 attm wuaa,

Patented Sept. 15, 1931 PATENT OFFICE LABAN E. JONES AND ALBERT N. NADEAU, OF ANAOONDA, MONTANA COIN -HANDLING APPARATUS Application filed November 23, 1926. Serial No. 150,344.

This invention relates to coin-handling apparatusof such a nature as to sort coins of several denominations rapidly and accurately, and arrange the sorted coins in stacks ready for use in making change.

The object of the invention is to provide a coin-handling apparatus, of relatively inex pensive construction, which will be suitable for use in ticket oflices, change booths, cashiers windows and similar places, and which not only sorts the coins in'stacks of several denominations but presents them in the view of a cashier or other operator in ready accessibility for making change.

In practically all monetary systems the coins are of circular disc formation, and coins of different denominations are of different diameters. This peculiarity is taken advantage of in sorting the coins, the sorting according to denominations being, actually, a sorting according to diameter.

We are aware that coin-handling apparatus have been devised heretofore which sort the coins according to their diameter, but we are not aware of'any such apparatus which makes use of this means in the manner and with the mechanical construction and arrangement of parts employed by us.

The invention consists in a coin-handling apparatus havin an inclined spiral runway or chute to which coins of all denominations are fed one at a time; this runway being provided with a plurality of branches, one for each denomination of coins, and means for separating the coins so that each branch will receive only coins of a single denomination, the runway and its branches constituting the coin sorting mechanism of the apparatus. And the invention comprises, further. tubes or the like into which the coins are fed from the several branches of the runway and in which they are stacked, and a serving apparatus and means for transferrin the stacks of coins thereto whereby the coins in their several denominations are presented in ready accessibility to an operator for purposes of making change, as we will proceed now to explain and finally claim.

In the accompanying drawings illustratapparatus;

Fig. 4: is a fragmentary sectional elevation v takenon the line 44 of Fig. 3;

Figs. 5 and 6 are views similar to 3, but on a larger scale,-illustrating the mode of operation of the means for transferring the stacks of coins from the stacking tubes to the serving mechanism;

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary side elevation of the runway and one of its branches;

Fig. 8 is a plan view of the parts shown in Fig. I

Fig. 9 is a fragmentary perspective view showing the detail of one of the plurality of coin-sorting openings used in the runway and its branches.

In the construction shown in the drawings, the apparatus comprises a plate 1 which may form the counter or table top of a cashiers booth'or ticket window. This plate is pro vided with a slot 2 of a length and width sufficient to receive coins of the largest size to be handled and sorted. Ordinarily the apparatus will be constructed for handling half dollars, quarter dollars, nickels, pennies (one-cent pieces) and dimes, the diameters of which diminish in the order given. Hence the slot 2 will be large enough to pass a half dollar and will therefore pass all of the smaller coins.

Connected with the slot 2 is an inclined spiral runway 3 having diverging from it a plurality of branches 4, 5, 6 and 7. The runway 3 is provided at approximately the point j with an opening, such as shown in Figs. 7 and 9, large enough to permit the passage through it and into branch 7, of dimes only, the other coins continuing along in runway 3. These dimes follow the course of the runway 7 to the point where the bottom of the runway is provided with a slot through which they drop into a chute 27 by which they are conveyed into a stacking tube 29. WVhen this stacking tub-e is filled the dimes overflow and pass through a slot, such as indicated at 11 in Fig. 3, into a. reserve tube 31 provided at its bottom with an opening, such as that shown at 12 (Fig. 3) through which. they may be discharged by operation of a suitable cut-oft such as the sliding state 33 shown. approximately the point 70, there is provided an opening similar to the opening at 7' but of a size to permit the passage thercthrough of the pennies only into branch 6, the niolzels, quarters and half-dollars continuing to follow the course of runway 3. These pennies rollalong 'in branch 6'until they are discharged through a slot in its bottom into a chute 26 by which they are conveyed to a stackingt ube 28. hen this tube isfilled the pennies overflow through a slot similar to slot-11, described. into a reserve tube 30, the latter being similar to and used in the same manner as the tube 31 by means of a gate or the like 32. At approximately the point [the runway 3 is provided with an opening similar to the openings already described but of a size to permit the passage therethrough of the nichels only into branch 5, the quarters and half-dollars following the courseof runway 3. The nickels thus rollin branch to the point 19 where they pass through a slot into a chute 20 by which they are conveyed to a stacking tube 21 having adjacent to it"a reserve tube 22 for the same purpose as tubes 31 and andhaving a gate or the lilre 23. At approximately the point 7) the runway 3 is provided with an opening similarto the other openings described but of a size to permit the passage therethrough of the quarters only into the branch runway 4, the half-dollars Following the course of main runway 3 and the quarters rolling in branch. runway 4 to the points 8 and 14, respectively, where they drop through slots into chutes 9 and 15 which convey them to stacking tubes 10 and 16 having adjacent to them reserve tubes ll and 17 similar to the tubes 31, 30 and 22 and provided with gates or the like 13 and 18, respectively.

Each of the stacking tubes 1.0, 16. 21. 28

and 29 is provided with a vertically slidable plunger 34 having a head 35 chainfered as indicated at 36 and forming a bottom for the tube, and each plunger carries a combined guide and finger piece 3? slidably engaging a rod 38 and its respective reserve tube. Also, each of these stacking tubes has an upper extension 39 slotted as shown at 40 to admit to its interior the ends of coin holding tingers 41 carried by leaf springs 41 on a sliding sleeve 42 mounted upon the extension 39 and normally pulled upward by pairs of springs :43 fixed at their opposite ends to holders 44 and 45 carried by theplate 1- and sleeve 42 respectively. The sleeve carries Further along the runway 3, at

also a finger piece 46 by means of which the sleeve may be depressed, as will later appear. On the plate 1 adjacent to the opening therethrough or" each of the extensions 39 is positioned a pair of stop members 4? partially overlying the bore of the adjacent tube for limiting upward movement of the coins in the extensions 39 to such a point that one coin only of each stack will extend above the upper surface of plate 1.

The resiliently supported sleeves 42, fingers 41 and stop members 47 in combination with the stacking devices constitute the serving apparatus hereinbetore referred to. The various parts of the apparatus may be assembled between the plate 1 a bottom plate 48 and spacing and connecting members 49, as shown.

The sorting operation of the apparatus is as follows: The cashier or other operator takes a stack of coins of various denominations to be sorted and passes them in their miscellaneous arrangement over the slot 2 so that they will drop one by one into the runway 3, in well known manner. Due to the fact that the runway is of inclined spiral arrangement', the coins will roll down same upon theiredges and be thrown by centrifugal action against the outer wall of the runway as shown at a (Fig. 8).

As hereinbei ore pointed out the runway 3 is provided with a plurality of openings such as shown in Figs. 7 and 9, and these openings are in its outer wall. Theoperation of one of these'openings in its influence upon the rolling coins will suflice for all and we will take, for example, the runway 3 and its opening at b, which connects it with the branch runway 4., as illustrated in Figs. 7 8 and 9. As explained, the opening at 7) is not high enough to allow half dollars to pass through it, but the quarters are of sui'licieutly small diameter to do so. Due to the fact that during their edgewise rolling passage down the runway 3the coins hug the outer wall 0 thereof, allcoins but the quarters and half dollars will have passed out of the main runway and into its branches. When the quarters reach the opening at Z) they will topple over so that their upper portions will extend through the opening and rest against the outer wall d of branch 4, as shown at 6, Fig. 8. They cannot, however, fall over, and, because of the guide-lip f, they cannot get out of runway 3 until they reach the end of this guide-lip, at which time their upper edges which are resting against the wall d have passed the upper end 9 of the inclined edge 71. of the end wall of the opening at b. The inclined edge it thus positively cams each coin which is tilted out of the runway 3 into the corresponding adjacent runway, since the upperend g of the inclined edge pos tively twists the coin from the main runway 3. By this means a positive separation of the proper sized coins is possible, since the rolling coins can not strike against an edge and bound back into the main runway, thus resulting in either a miss-sorting of the coins or a clogging of the runway. They pass thence, still on edge, into branch 4, as shown at 2', Figs. 7 and 8.

By providing the incline to the edge h of each of the openings at j, 73, Z and b we are enabled to prevent coins of a size larger than those for which the particular opening is designed from running the portions of their edges which are in contact with the bottom of runway 3 through the opening at the end of lip f. This is so far the reason that the inclined edge h contacts with them at or ahead of their vertical diameters and they are unable to tilt sufliciently to' pass out through openings not designed to permit them to pass.

WVe are aware that sorting apparatus has been devised in which the coins roll on edge down a spiral runway and pass out of same by flopping over through appropriately proportioned openings into separate receivers provided for them, but we are not aware of any device, similar to ours, where the coins are sorted as they roll, by switching them from one path of travel to another and causing them to continue to roll, after sorting, until they are deposited in collecting and stacking devices provided for them.

Obviously the stack handling and serving apparatus may be omitted where sorting only is required, but our device has marked utility when employed in booths and oifices where the making of change rapidly and accurately is of importance, and the operation of these features of the invention may be stated as follows: lVhen the stacking tubes contain coins resting upon the heads of the plungers 34, the finger pieces 37 and 46 may be grasped and moved toward each other. This results in the stack of coins being so raised that the spring pressed fingers 41, when lowered by depression of the finger piece 46, will pass over the edges of the coins and in passing the bottom one of the stack will snap under it into the space provided by the chamfer 36 of the head 35. This operation is clearly illus trated in Fig. 5, the dotted line position of the plunger 34 being itsnormal coin-receiving position, and the full lines showing the plunger raised with the stack of coins upon it and the sleeve 42 depressed so that the fingers 41 are beneath the stack of coins.

Now, upon releasing the finger pieces 37 and 46, the plunger 34 will drop, by gravity; to its initial normal position, and the sleeve 42 with its fingers 41 carrying the stack of coins will be raised by the springs 43 until the topmost coin of the stack contacts with the overhanging stop members 47. This is illustrated in Fig. 6, and in this figure other coins are shown stacking in the tube.

Obviously, all of the several tubes and their appurtenances operate in exactly the same manner, so that when stacks of coins in all the tubes are raised to the position'shown in Fig. 6, half dollars, quarters, nickels, pennies and dimes will be so presented that the topmost one of each stack may be pushed from beneath the stopmembers 47 and out upon. the plate or counter 1, the next coin beneath it automatically taking its place against members 47.

By this means, having coins of all denominations in plain sight and easy of access, it will be seen that change may be made very expeditiously.

In normal operation, where our device is used as a change maker, more coins are received than are paid out, but should the coins in any stacking tubebecome exhausted, the supply may be replenished by taking an adequate number from the appropriate reserve tube by manipulation of its gate to bring the opening thereofin register with the coins in the tube so that the same may drop through into the opera tors hand, and thereafter being inserted preferably by dropping them into the slot 2 whereby thev find their-way into the properstacking tube.

It will-thus be seen that we provide a very simple coin sorting device which will separate coins of different denominations rapidly and accurately. and combine therewith, if desired, a stacking and serving mechanism which presents coins of all denominations in full View of the operator and in position to be quickly and easily handled in making change, the only movement on the part of the operator being that of shoving the change across the counter; The coin-serving apparatus is so arranged as to be easilv spanned by the hand, and there being five deno1ninations of coins, one finger may be used for each denomination.

Our device is, in addition to its being a change-making apparatus andcoin-sorting device. a coin storage device, it being obvious that when used, for example, in a cashiers booth, coins coming in over the counter and dropped into the slot 2, will be stored in the stacking tubes and reserve tubes.

Various changes are contemplated as within the spirit of the invention and the scope of the following claims.

lVe claim:

1. In a coin-handling apparatus, a coinserving apparatus comprising a stacking tube in which coins are stacked in uniform order, means for introducing coins into said tube at the central portion thereof, means for moving a stack of coins longitudinally of saidtube, means active upon a predetermined longitudinal movement of said stack of coins for resiliently supporting said stack of coins in said tube, and means fixed relatively to said tube for limiting movement of thestack of coins under the influence of the resilient supporting means.

2. In a coin-handling apparatus, a coinserving appartus comprising a stacking tube having an inlet in the side wall of an overflow outlet in the side wall opposite said inlet, a plunger mounted in said tube normally below said inlet and slidable longitudinally of said tube for raising the stack of coins therein, resiliently supported means mounted adjacent the top end of said tube for receiving said stack of coins and raising same to a position of access, and means fixed relatively to said tube for limiting the movement of said stack of coins under the influence of said resiliently supported means.

3. In a. coin-handlin apparatus, a coinserving apparatus comprising a stacking tube adapted to receive coins in orderly stacked arrangement, a plunger mounted in said tube and slidable longitudinally thereof for raising the stack of coins therein, a sleeve resiliently supported upon said tube and provided with coin holding fingers adapted to receive the stack of coins from said plunger and support same, and stop members arranged in predetermined fixed relation to the end of said tube for limiting movement of the stack of coins under the influence of the resiliently supported fingers.

L'In a coin-handling apparatus, a coinserving apparatus comprising a stacking tube adapted to receive a plurality of coins in orderly stacked arrangement, a plunger normally supporting'said coins and slidable longitudinally of said tube, a plate arranged at the end of said tube and having an opening conforming to the bore of said tube and stop members partially overlying said opening, and resiliently supported coin-holding fingers arranged to receive the stack of coins from said plunger durlng its longitudinal slidlng movement and force the topmost coin of said stack against said stop members.

5. In a coin-handling apparatus, i a runway adapted to receive coins in single file and so arranged as to cause rolling motion of said coins therein in contact with one side wall thereof, said wall being provided with an opening to allow a predetermined size of coins to pass therethrough, said opening being provided with a lower lip to thereby tilt the proper size coins into said opening prior to their complete passage therethrough, the end wall of said opening sloping upwardly counter to the direction of motion of said coins.

6. In a coin-handling apparatus, a runway adapted to receive coins in single file and so arranged as to cause rolling motion of said coins therein in contact with one side wall thereof, said wall being provided with an opening to allow a predetermined size of coin to pass therethrough, the entrance portion of said opening being provided with a lower lip to retain the lower edge of a coin of the predetermined size within said runway as the top edge of said coin tilts outwardly through said opening, and means for deflecting the lower edge of said tilted coin from said'runway when the rolling coin clears the end of said lower lip;

7. A coin-handling apparatus of the type having an inclined runway adapted to receive coins in single file and having an opening in one wall of said runway through which coins of a predetermined size pass, characterized by the fact that said opening has substantially the shape of a rhomboid with a guide lip on its lower edge, said guide lip terminating short of the length of the opening. 7

8. In a coin-handling apparatus, aspiral runway adapted to receive coins in single file and to impart centrifugal force thereto to cause said coins to roll in contact with one side-wall of said runway, said wall being provided with an opening to allow a predetermined size of coin to pass therethrough, said opening havin-ga lower lip to thereby tilt the proper size. coins into said opening prior to their complete passage therethrough, the end wall of saidopening sloping upwardly counter to the direction of motion of said come.

9. In a coin-handling apparatus, a stacking tube adapted: to receive and'stack coins of one size, a plunger mounted in and slidabl'e longitudinally of said tube for raising the stack of coins therein, and means for receiving and removing said stack of coins from said plunger.

10. In a coin-handling apparatus, means for efiecting a separation of coins into separate denominations according to their diameters,including an inclined spiral runway into which the coins are fed and in which they roll on edge in single file in contact with the outer wall of said runway, said outer Wall being provided with an opening, said opening being elongated in the direction of movement of said coins, and having an upstanding lip along the bottom of said opening, said lip terminating short of the end of said opening. 7

l1. The structure as set forth in claim 10 characterized by the fact that the end wall of said opening adjacent the end of the said upstanding lip slants upwardly and in the direction of movement of said coins.

12. In a coin-handling apparatus, a runway adapted to receive coins in single file and so arranged as to cause rolling motion of said coins in contact with one side wall of saidrunway, said wall being provided with an opening to allow a predetermined size of coin to pass therethrough,the entrance por-' tion of said opening being provided with a lower lip to retain the lower edge of a coin of predetermined size within therunway as the top edge of said coin tilts outwardly through said opening, and means at the exit portion of said opening and positioned to be engaged only by those rolling coins whose upper edges are tilted through said opening for deflecting the lower edges of said tilted coins from said runway as the tilted rolling coins severally clear the end of said lower lip.

13. The invention as set forth in claim 9 wherein said means comprises members resiliently mounted in the path of movement of said stack of coins and displaceable thereby upon the movement of said stack of coins.

14. In a coin-handling apparatus, a stacking tube adapted to receive and stack coins of one size, a plunger mounted for longitudinal movement in said tube, means for introducing coins into said tube above said plunger, means for moving sad plunger upwardly, and means active upon an upward movement of said stack of coins for engaging the bottom coin of said stack and removing said stack from said plunger.

15. The invention as set forth in claim 14 wherein said second means resiliently holds said stack of coins in the upper portion of said tube.

16. The invention set forth in claim 14 wherein said second means comprises members disposed circumferentially about that portion of the axis of said tube along which said stack of coins is moved by said plunger.

In testimony whereof, we aflix our signatures.

LABAN E. JONES. ALBERT N. NADEAU.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2523089 *Oct 22, 1947Sep 19, 1950Block David ICoin stacking and packaging device
US2680444 *May 22, 1951Jun 8, 1954Grant Max LAntijaming means for multiple-coin fare collecting apparatus
US2766762 *Aug 24, 1950Oct 16, 1956Max L GrantCoin deliverer for fare-collecting apparatus
US3227363 *Oct 19, 1962Jan 4, 1966Anker Werke AgCoin sorting apparatus
US3367346 *Oct 26, 1966Feb 6, 1968Gdanski Ronald CCoin sorter
US5902178 *Feb 12, 1997May 11, 1999Mag-Nif IncorporatedCoin sorting apparatus
US6165063 *Feb 10, 1999Dec 26, 2000Mag-Nif, IncorporatedCoin sorting apparatus
US6443829 *Jul 14, 2000Sep 3, 2002Jerzy PerkitnyCoin sorting apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification453/15, 453/54
International ClassificationG07D3/08, G07D3/00
Cooperative ClassificationG07D3/08
European ClassificationG07D3/08