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Publication numberUS1824381 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 22, 1931
Filing dateMar 24, 1931
Priority dateSep 27, 1929
Publication numberUS 1824381 A, US 1824381A, US-A-1824381, US1824381 A, US1824381A
InventorsSorensen Einar F, Sorensen Niels E E
Original AssigneeSorensen Einar F, Sorensen Niels E E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Lumber positioning mechanism
US 1824381 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 22, 1931. E. F. SORENSEN ET AL 1,324,381

LUMBER POSITIONING MECHANISM Filed March 24,, 1931 s Sheets-Sheet- 1 m \Nl=\ A TTORNEYS.

INVENTORS.

p 22, 1931- F. sbRENsN ET AL 1,824,381

LUMBER POSITIONING MECHANISM Filed March 24, 1931 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTORS f. s'b'renscn )7. 3; 85m sen Won/L0 A TTORNEYS.

Sept. 22, 1931. E. F. S ORENSEN ET AL LUMBER POSITIONING MECHANISM Filed March 24 w 1 w, \\u w R O w "a u a B 2 5 Z 3 3 a /L/. I Z 9 I 13' I 27' 1s A TTORNEYS.

Sept. 22, 1931. E. F. SORENSEN ET AL 1,324,331

LUMBER POSITIONING MECHANISM Filed March 24, 1931 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 IN V ENTORS A TTORNEYS.

Sept. 22, 1931. E. F. SORENSEN ET AL 1,324,381

LUMBER POSITIONING MECHANISM Filed March 24, 1951 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 ATTORNEYS.

IN V EN TORS' 5 Sept. 22, 1931. E. F. SORENSEN ET AL 1,324,381,

LUMBER POSITIONING ma'cmmsu Filed March 24, 1931 e Sheets-Sheet 6 no -Jaw A TTORNEYS.

Patented Sept. 22, 1931 amen r. Seamsmie SfIfOCKHOLM; AND mars SGRENSER/QF SAV'ENAS ,PEB,

'JPIFATE'NT orrlca I eo'r'rmBon-e, SWEDEN 7 LUMBER rosrrronme M CHANIS Application'filedi'larch'24,--1931, Seria1 No.524,968, and in Sweden September 27, 1929.

This invention refers to the manufacture of battens or boards and particularly to trim-- ming of their edges. More especially this 1nvention concerns an apparatusfor adjusting the lumbers when supplied intoan edging machine such that they when trued may be out along their edges'with the slightest possible waste of material. v i.

Themain object of-this invention 'is to save timber when edging lumbers cut from trunks of trees with thenatural rough'outer surfaces present. Another object of this invention is to make the positioning of the battens or boards into the edging machine 1 free from the degree of carefulness of the man in charge and-to ensure automatically a wasteless truing of thelumben: A further object of this invention is to increase the capacity of theedging machine 20. by reducing the-time and deadspacesbetween the supply therein of two consecutive specimens of blanks. 7

It is already proposed to bring'about an effect similar to that aimed at by this invention, whereby mechanically operated selectors are brought into .contact'with the uneven edge of the lumber, and bring about a lateral shift of the lumber,or in another mechanism both a lateral shift and a change in inclination of the length of the blank tothe planeof cut, the object aimedat being to set the lumber such that theshaping saw will cut it along aplane-which touches the bottom of the deepest irregularity" in the first half of its length, and the bottom of the deepest irregularity in the rear half of its length.

- All mechanisms known for this object are such in which the adjustment of the lumber is effected directly by the selectors in dependence on "the? amplitude of their movement into contactwith the cavities in the edge of the work p ece and thework piece must move; during the operation ofthe' selec-' tors, either longitudinally in front .ofthe selectors, the pointsrof which slide along the edgeof the work piece, andoperate asthey f p pass over: the irregularities gthereof, orlaterally to or from the selectors, the selectors being pushed backwardsby advancing work '5 piece, or forced forward bysprings against and cut it nowhere, The expression touch the receding work piece, the variable depths of the irregular edge of the Work piece'limiting the amplitude of movement of the various selectors. There are no mechanisms knownj before, which can properly adjust the work piece to the slope of the direction of feed which causes the least waste of material, Experience has shown that it is difficult .to securefsatisfactory performance of such operations, especially on account of the extraordinarily short time allowable for the operation of the selectors. n

The present invention solves the problem more perfectly by a modification of the method, by which ample time can be allowed for the operation of the mechanism, and this facilitates the operations and simplifies the mechanism by which the method is carried out. o

If the irregularities in the edge of the work piece-are fairly small, or have substantially the same depth throughout the entire length of the workpiece, the lumber has to pass the saw or shaping tool substantially in the direction of its length; but if the irregularities are more extensive or more 11111- even, it is necessary to alter the directionof forward feed of the lumber and have it pass the saw or shaping tool in a somewhat oblique direction, in order that the plane of cut may touch the bottom of the two cavities, oneon each side of the mid point which are deepest in proportion to their distance from the mid point; in other word-s said plane may touch the surface of the rough edge at two points, one point on each side of the middle point,

hereineludes also such a case, where said plane of cut is directed towards a point .at theone end of the lumber but fails to conreason only, because said point of .contact is disposed at the'very end of the work piece. The plane of economical trimming so defined' is hereinafter called the'tangential lane. The present invention has for its ob- Ject mechanically to determine with greater precision and certainty than was formerly achieved not-only the extent of lateral displacementof the work piece required but also the proper slope of the direction of feed so that the plane of cut will be the best possible, i. e. will cause the least waste of material.

It is often desirable that the finished edge of the work piece shall not be square to the fiat sides but more or less sloping, for instance in conformity with the natural taper of the cross-section of the lumberarising from the round surface of the trunk of tree from which the lumber is cut out. The ad-- justment of the work piece under such circumstances must take into account the angle of taper the least waste of material is to result.

A characteristic of the method of themvention is the setting up beside the work piece of an inverted or relief facsimile of the cavities in the edge of the work piece, the actual cavities in tl e work piece being repre sented in the relief facsimile by prongs or projections which facsimile subsequently is used to govern tne adjustment of the lumber. Thisinverted facsimile is conveniently used to determine the position of a ruler, which is caused to contact with the projecting prongs of the facsimile, or with. auxiliary members the position of which is controlled by the facsimile, and the ruler in its turn determines or limits the lateral shift and inclinaton of the lumber. I

-The invention may be carried out in various ways which difier in their details, and by means of different mechanisms, and it is not possible to describe them all. However all'have the above mentioned common feajusted, constitute the facsimile. tion between workpiece and l and the standing on a somewhat different scale. Thus ture viz: that the cavities in the edge of the work pieces are mechanically reproduced *in'relief in a facsimile which is used for adjusting through the intermediary of a ruler.

' "-The inverted facsimile of the work piece edge best-can be set up hymeans of a pluralityof arms or pins, so called selectors, which are movable laterally relatively to the work piece, and are caused to touch its edge, the

extent oftheir movement being-transmitted to other members which, when properly ad- This co-acselectorsjcan be achieved either by pushing ach of the selectors per se against the work piece by springs or other yielding mechanical means, orby moving the work piece laterally against the selectors until they are all in touch with its edge. I

The expression facsimile does not necessarily mean that the facsimile made up by the implements outside of the work piece is an exact copy of the actual work plece, but that the unevennessesof the edge of the work piece are to be found in the facsimile in such a-way relativee'xtensions of the cavities pro ections are identical not-withthat the the length may be the same in the facsimile as in the actual work piece, but the scale of the projections and cavities of the unevennesses may be smaller in the facsimile than in the actual work piece. Also it is not necessary to copy the whole length of the work piece,-but some-single points thereof may suflice. In the preferred form of the carrying out of this invention we limit ourselves to procure the facsimile of two points only of the'edge of the actual work piece, viz. the bottom points of the two deepest cavities, one

the work piece-01 other stops, the positions of which are controlled by the prongs-abut against the ruler as the result of which the work piece is set, if necessary at a slant in relation to the plane of cut, so that the cut will pass along the tangential plane when thework piece is fed forward in that position.

2. The ruler is made laterally adjustable to the cutting plane or to a plane parallel therewith. In this case the edge of the work piece will be imitated before it has reached the plane of cut whereupon the ruler is moved to the cutting plane or to the plane parallel therewith, and moves the facsimile and with it the work piece, also by pressing against the two most projecting prongs of the facsimile, one on each side of the middle point of the work piece, at the sametime slanting the work piece (if required) in relation to the plane of out until said plane coincides with thetan ential plane.

The ruler is movable in the same plane in which the work piece is supplied into the machine or in a plane parallel thereto. The work picee is locked in that position in which it is to be imitated, and the ruler is brought into contact with the two most projecting prongs of the facsimile, one on each side of the middle point of the work piece, or in contact with two stops which previously have been adj nsted in conformity with said two prongs when so moving, the ruler adjusts two auxiliary members which are lockedin that positioninto 'whi'ch they are brought when the ruler abuts on the two prongs or stops whereupon thework piece is movedlaterally, and, if requisite, slant wise so that the plane of cut will coincide with the tangential plane if the work piece is fed forward in that position.

In all the three above mentioned cases adjustment may be effected in relation to another plane than theplane of cut ifsuch other planeisso related to thepl-ane of cut that the cut will pass along the tangential plane when thework piece is .fed for-wardto the shaping tool. Adjustmenti in relation to another plane than the plane :of out isuseful when the work pieces are supplied into the machine in a plane other thanthatof feed tothershaping tool. Adjustment insuch anotlier plane has the: advantage that adjustment of one work piececan be effected immediately when the foregoing work piece has been started'on its way tothe shaping tool whereby a work piece adjusted in any other plane has only to be moved a rather small distanceto come in position to be fed forward to the shaping tool. Bythis scheme thework pieces can be fed forward in closer succession, and more time be allowed for the operation of the adj n semen t in cans, which imparts some mechanical advantages. I j

As already mentioned this invention can be performed invarious ways, and the means suited for such a performance can be varied so ertensively'thatit isnot possible to. describe them all. To facilitate the understanding of this invention one embodiment of a machine suitedto accomplish the improved method is illustrated diagrammatically in the accompanyingdrawings, but we are anxious to declare that we do not want'to limit 'ourselves to the use exclusively of a machine of the specified type shown in the drawings. Fig. 1 shows an endview partly in section of a selector machine with a movable ruler and tworows of selectors at a certain instant in the adjusting operation.

Fig. 2 shows the same view when adjust ment is finished and the work piece has been moved laterally into position for edge shaping.

Fig; 3 is a purely diagrammatic plan view of the same embodiment showing the position of the one row of selectors when the facsimile has been completed. Y

Fig. 4 is the same plan view as in Fig. 3 after the work piece has been adjusted and moved laterally to the cutting plane ready to be fed forward to the shaping tool. I

Fig. 5 is an end view of the same character as Figs. 1 and 2 but showing on a decreased scale another embodiment of the invention with a movable ruler. v 1

Fig. 6 is a plan view showing how the gripn bers,-the edges of which are portzons' of the Z1120 pers lock the work piece .to thecross-rod; Fig.7 is a side view of the machineshowing' how the eccentricson the main driving shaft actuate the machine by intermediance of levers.

'Fig. 8 is'anend view showing the levers which limit the lateral displacementfof the work piece, and means for fixing said levers in the position-.w"anted. i

Fig. 9*is an-end view showing the triangu- 15:5 larframe which-controls them'ovement'of the selectors, and means :for' transferringthe movement of the main drivingshaft on to said triangular frame. I li The third of the three principal embodiments of the invention mentioned above, viz. that with a movable ruler which adjusts auxiliary members, has proved to she the simplest supported at each end in the frame of'the machinein such a way that the vertical andhorizontal distance between the-two shafts can-be varied. To exemplify such .anjadjustment, 35 the upper shaft 6 is shown supported in a vertical guide framed which is movable within a horizontal guide frame 6. i

The selectors 3 and 4 have each two points 8, 9 and 10, 11 respectively so positioned that a straight line through the two points 8, 9

or 10, 11of a selectorintersects the centre line of theshaft 5 or 6 on which that selector is pivoted. The distanceof the points 8, 9

of thelower selectors 3 from 'the'centre line 4 of their shaft 5 are proportional to the distances of thepoints 10, 11 of the upper selectors 4from the'centre line of their shaft 6: forinstance the ratio of the distances from shaft5 to points 8 and 9, and that of the dis- V tances from shaft 6 to points lOland 11 may be as 3 to 1. Springs 12 tend to swing the selectors 3 and 4 toward the plane .of cut 2. Parallel to theshafts 5 and 6 is a ruler 13,

the ends of which are supported in trucks 14, 5

movable on horizontal rails 15 transversely of the plane 2'. The ruler 13 is so connected to the truck 14 that it can pivot round its horizontal midline 16 or a line parallel thereto, as well as incline lengthwise to the plane 3110 of cut by causing thetruckat the one endto move nearer to theplane of out than the truck at the opposite end. The object of pivoting the ruler 13 about centre line 16 is to adjust the inclination ofthe ruler in conformity with the inclinationoftheplane of cut. 2. w The surface of theruler 13 facing'the selec- I tors may be plane, when squared lu'mbers are tobe dealt with, and convex for roughlumnatural rounded trunks of the treesi Weights 17 springs. or similar appliances pullupon'thetrucks 14. The'movements'of the trucks 14 against thepull ofmembers-17 determine the throw of thefruler' 13. A cord or pull rod 18, 18 extends from each end 13, 13" of the ruler 13 (or from eachtruclr .114) to the one end'390 of a double-armedlever 19,-19. At. the} opposite end said, levers carry stops 20,, 20", :and the jlevers are 13% pivoted in the frame'7 of the machine on pins '21, 21" parallel to the plane of cut 2. The lengths of the two arms of the levers 19, 19 have the same-ratio as the aforesaid ratio of the distances from the two points of selectors?) or 4 to the center of their resp-ective shafts 5 or 6, viz. as mentioned 1 to 3.

In front ,of each lever 19", 19 there is a slide 22, 22 movable in guides 220 in the frame 7 at right angles to the line or plane of out 2. Each slide has a stop 23, 23"as also a slot or guide 241,24 at the end adjacent the plane 2 which slots or guides are parallel to that plane 2,,and in said slots pins 25, 25 move, supporting a cross-rod 26. Thus said cross-rod not only can be moved parallel to itself but also inclined in a horizontal plane to the line or plane of cut 2. The crossrod 26 is provided with two gripping arms 27', 27, the latter of which being pivoted on a vertical pin28 fixed to a slide 52 movable lengthways in a guide 53 in cross-rod 26, see Fig. 6. A rod 68 is fixed in a bearing in slide 66 and screwed through slide 52 thereby allowing the adjustment of the distance from slide 66 to pin 28. Slide 66 is movable in a guide 67 in cross-rod 26. A stop on slide 66 projects under cross-rod 26. Two doublearmed levers 60 and 63 are pivoted on vertical pins 61 and .62 on the frame 7 of the machine. The longer arms of these levers project under cross-rod. 26 and actuate the movement of slide 66 by pressure on the abovesaid stop projecting from slide 66 .below cross-rod 26.

The shorter arms of levers and 63 are connected to the lower ends of single levers 64:

' and 65 pivoted onshaft 34, see Fig. 7, and

actuated by cams. 56 and 57 mounted on shaft 37. Springs 54'and' 55 are fixed with one end in the frame 7 and the other end in levers'63 and 60. The gripper 27 is designed as a double-armed lever, the shorter arm 27 of which is provided with a roller 51 running in a slot 50 made in. a flat piece of iron 69 fixed on cross-rod 26. Gripper 27 and plate 69 can be fixed on cross-rod '26 closer to or further from each other to suit the length of the work piece. The gripping arms 27 27 project towards the plane 2 and have hooks or points to engage and retain between them a work piece 29 supplied into the machine.

At each end of the machine there is a triangular frame 30 pivoted at its upper corner on a common shaft31 parallel to plane 2.

The lower corners of the frames 30 are joined by rods32,'33, one of which, 32, limits the advance of the selectors?) and 4 towards the plane 2 and. withdraws the selectors from said plane after use, whilst the other rods 33 are attached to the lower endsof the springs vLengthways through the machine and parallel to the plane ofcut 2 there is the main driving shaft 37 and intermediate shaft 34. i Shaft 37 actuates the movements of the against swinging to the left.

various parts of the adjusting machine. For this purpose the following eccentrics are mounted on shaft 37 and corresponding levers pivotable on shaft 34. Said levers are provided with rollers or pins running against the peripheriesof, or in grooves in the eccentrics which actuate them.

At each endof shaft'37, see Fig. 7, eccentrics 73, 73" are mounted against which the rollers 77 7'7 on the longer arms of levers 72 and 72", pivotably mounted on shaft 84, are pressed by springs 7 6, 76 Fig. 8. The object of eccentrics 73, 73" is to lock the levers 19, 19 which limit the lateral movement of the work piece, since said levers by pullrods or cords 18, 18" have been positioned in accordance with the inverted facsimile, and-to keep the levers 19", 19" locked in said position until the gripper 27 has released the adjusted work piece. For this purpose eccentrics 73, 73 are shaped along the lines shown by way of example in Fig. 8. From its highest point a the eccentric falls straight down to a smaller circle 72" by rods 75, 75" are pivotally connected with eccentrics 7 0, 70 which eccentrics are 'pivotally mounted on pins 71, 71" fixedon the frame 7 of the machine. Ec'centrics 74, 74 are fixed on levers 19, 19. As long as rollers 77, 77" are pressed against section 0a of eccentrics 73, 7 3" by springs 76, 76", eccentrics 70, 70 are kept swung to the left, and consequently levers 19', 19 can be swung into any position wanted. When shaft 37 (which revolves in the direction of the arrow) has turned eccentrics 73, 73 so far that rollers 77, 77" have passed by point a, levers 72, 72" are swung to the right until the edges of eccentrics 70, 70 hit the edges of eccentrics 74, 74". As the tangential point between these two eccentrics which in Fig. 8 is marked (1, is situated to the left of a line drawn through the centers of pins 21 and 71, levers 19, 19 are locked There is no need of locking them for swinging to the right as there is no force this way.

Against the eccentrics 36 and 36" levers '35 are kept pressed by springs 370 towards springs 370 to the right,this motion causes slides 22, 22" which carry cross-rod 26 to be pulled back also to their initial position.

against which levers-58, 58" haverollersr nsaesslr Further eccentrics on shaft 37 are 59', 59'

Z9, 79 runningin grooves. Fig. 9 shows details of this co-action, and is taken inthe moment when lever 58.'rhas swung itsmaximum to 'th-e left thus having caused frame 30 by meansof link '78 toe-wing to thelimit of its movement to the left. That portion'of .T'oove 80 which roller 79"; has reached, in the position. shown in. Fig. 9 is forabout 10 degrees shaped as a circlewith the same centre as shaft 37. Whilst theroller passes. these 10' degrees, frame remains in the same position, and consequently alsothe selectors controlled by frame 30, which selectors form the inverted facsimile. Asa consequence ruler l3 and levers19f, .19, also On the left half in Fig. 70f shaftf37"there is mounted also an eccentric 56 against which a lever 64 which is pivotally mounted on shaft 34, is pressedby the spring which tends to swing the double armed lever 60, see Fig. 6, pivotally mounted on pin 61 on, frame 7 of the machine, to the-right,-the shorter arm of which lever-acts on the lower end of lever 64. The shapeof eccentric 56 is not specifically shown in the drawings, as it is shaped on the same principles as eccen tric 73 in Fig. 8, the only difference being that sections a?; and bc together take only about 90 degrees of the circle. Wheneccentric 56 has revolved so far that the end roller oflever 64 has passed by thesloppingpoint on said eccentric, nothing prevents theend of levers 6% from swinging forward against plane 2, Figs. 6 and 7: Lever 60 consequently. is released, and the tension of. spring 55 swings "said lever to the right, whereby its longer arm forces slide 66 the same way until slide 52 also by the intermedianceof rod 68 is forced so far to the right that gripper 27",

' 3 actuated by the roller 51 whichis-fixed on its shorter arm and runs ingroove '50, has been swung so far to the left that the sharp point at the end of itslonger arm has entered into the end of the work piece.

The angle of the right hand portion of groove 50 with guide 53 must be less than the friction angle, say lessthan some'13 degrees. Consequently any pressure from the'work piece onto the end of the gripper 27, the

Y oint of which has entered into the end. of the g work piece, cannot force the gripper 27" to win to the right, and thus the work piece is rigidly secured to cross-rod 26 between the gripping arms 27 and 27".. The eccentricity of eccentric 56 then on further revolving-of shaft 37 causes lever 64 to swing back from the plane of cut 2. The lower end of-lever 64 thereby forces lever 60 to swing to the-left against the tension of spring 55, the; longer arm of i'lever' slide 66.

On. the right half in Fig. '7 of shaft 37 there is mounted an'eccentric57 actingon lever 65;'which' is pivotallymounted on shaft 34., in the lever 6-1 described above. Eccentric57-is shaped justas eccentric 56with the exception that the. former has a larger eccentricity to allow a more extensive movement of lever 65. Lever 65 actuates lever 63 withits spring55 in the same way aslever64. actuates lever60, however, allowing lever 63a. more extensive movement. The larger am+ plitude necessary for lever 63 is due to lever. 63 having for its object firstly to release the work piece by forcing gripper 27 to swingback to the right in the proper moment, and secondly co-pull cross-rod 26 back endways to the left into its initial position Fig. 6. shows the position ofthe various means for lockingthe work piece to crossrod 26 justas this locking has been per-, formed. When the work piece has been adjusted, and the catch 91 on the feeding chain 92 engages the work piece and feeds it to wards the shaping tool 1, the work piece must still be kept locked to cross-rod 26 until the workpiece is seized by the press rollers 93 of the edging machine 94 whichthen under take the 'task of keeping the work piece in. position Then at first the work piece is released from cross-rod 26 by gripper 27"" being forced to swing back. Consequently cross-rod-26 is caused to follow this forward motion of the .work piece which movement is allowed: bymeans of elongation of-the slot or guides 24, 24 as diagrannnaticailly indicated in Figs. 3 and 4 by the irregular parallel lines 24 and 24f.v Thus before gripper 27" is swung -back,' .cross-rod 26 and slide 66 havemoved to the right solthat slide 66 is quite close to the longer-arm of lever .63 which. lever as described before is mountedon pin'62, fixedtol the machine frame 7, and consequentl'y it does not follow the forward movement of cross-rod 26. When eccentric 57 has revolved sofar that lever 65 can-swing forward towards plane 2, lever 63 is releasedand swung to the left by the tension of spring 54. Lever 60 as described then has already been forced to swingback to the left." When lever 63-swings to the left, its'longer arm hits'the stop'of slide. 66 which projects below cross-rod 26, and forces sllde 66 to the left. By intermediance of rod 68 slide53 which carries the pivot for gripper 27'. also is forced to the left. Roller 51 same way as eccentric56 actuates I which runs in slot 50, hereby causes gripper 27 to swing back to the right'thus' releasing the work piece.

When slide 66 has swinging to the left of lever 63 forces cross rod.2 6 .,endways"back into its in tlalw-posl'w it reaches the position shown in Fig. 6.

The eccentrics mounted onmainshaft 37 as; above described are positioned in such a way that they act in the folowing order:

1. Eccentric 56 releases lever'6t which in v its turn releases lever 60 which causes gripper 27 to swing to the left and grip the work piece.

shafts'37 revolution, is kept in its most for:

ward position, and thus lock arms 19, 19". 4. Eccentrics 36", 36". release levers in the momentas frame 30 is brought back into 9 its initial position.

5. Eccentric 57 releases lever as soon as the work piece is caught by the press rollers 93 of the edging machine 94, thus releasing the work piece from cross-rod 26.

In the example shown in the drawings, the

selector machine is combined with an edging machine 94 of a known type (see Fig. 7) in which machine the work piece is fed forwards to the shaping tool 1 by a link chain 92 with disappearing jaws or catches 91. Said link chain 92 is driven from the driving motor 95 of the edging machine, and'the main shaft 37 must be driven by the same motor as exemplified by chain 96 in Fig. 7, or by adequate means which make the shaft 37 revolve in synchronism with the operation of the link chain 92 so that shaft 37 makes one revolution for each operative catch 91. There will thus be synchronism in the operation of the edging machine and the adjusting mechanism,,iso that a work piece will be adjusted ready for feeding forwards to shaping tool each time, one of the disappearing catches is made operative to catch and feed a work piece.

The operation of the'adjusting mechanism is as'follows: The lumber 29 is pushed into the machine between the open gripping arms 27 27 until the edge to be shaped comes into contact with a ruler 38, see Fig. 1, parallel to the line or plane of cut 2 and adapted to be lowered into a groove 97 in the machine table 98, see Fig. 2, when the selectors 3, 4 are ready to swing out to perform their task. The ruler 38 is'well beyond the plane 2 so that I the edge of thelumber to be shaped must beyond that plane before it contacts with the ruler. I If the adjusting mechanism and edging machine operate normally, there will be no catches 91 in the feed conveyor 92 in Opera tive position ready to engage the work piece 2. Eccentrics 59, 59 by means of levers.

in this position but the movable gripping arm 27 actuated, as described, from the shaft 37 r is now caused to grip the lumber between itself and arm 27 and hold it stationary relatively to the cross-rodl26l The continuous revolution of shaft 37 causesframes 30 to swing to the left in Figs. Y

1 and 2, springs 12 thus forcing the selectors 3, 1 towards thework piece until they are stopped by their lower points 8, 10 abutting against the lower respectively upper portion of the edge of the work piece. During this motion, the upper points 9, 11 of the selectors are in Contact with the ruler 13 and push it to the left against the resistance of the two weights (or springs) 17 The mounting of the ruler enables it to assume an inclined positionin relation to the line or plane of cut 2 corresponding to the tangential plane of the edgeof the work piece, because the ruler will be pushed to the left as long as any of the selectors has not yet been stopped by the work piece, thatis, has not reached the bottom of the cavity in the edge of the work piece which lies in front of said stopper. I In such a position of the selectors in which points 8 and/or 10 of two selectors contact the bottom of the two deepest cavities in the edge of the work piece, the ruler 13 will be moved because the upper points 9, 11 of the two selectors most deflected proportionally to their distance from the midpoint of the work piece, control the position of the ruler 13. Fig. 3 shows such displacement of the ruler 13, those points of the selectors which control the displacement being designated anl 90 re spectively. In the Figures 2 and 3 the cavities in the edge of the work piece intentionally are designed rather exaggeratedly, but

that'is done with the object to clearly demonstrate the operation of the selectors. Through the cords or pull rods 18 and 18 the ruler 13 tilts the levers 19, 19 so that their lower ends 20, 20 move to the right, the throw of said ends being proportional to the displacement of the corresponding ends of the ruler 13.

As soon as frame 30 has swung its maximum towards plane of out, making all selectors abut with their lower points againstthe edge of the work piece, thus keeping the inverted facsimile formed by their upper points as well as levers 19, 19" positioned and controlled by them through the intermediance of ruler, stationary levers 19, 19 are locked in their actual position as described before and shown. in Fig. 8 or by any other suitable means. The continuous revolution of shaft 3'? causes eccentrics 59, 59 through the intermediance of levers 58, 58 to swing the frames 30, and with them the selectors in direction from plane 2 into their initial position after which the eccentrics 36 on the shaft 37' release levers 35, and the springs 370 are free topull the levers with the slides 22, 22 1;

to the left until the stops 23, 23" onsaid slides make contact with the corresponding lever ends 20", 20". Each of. the slides22;

22 will be moved more or less to the left until its stops 23 0r'23 contact with the lever end 20 or 20", and consequently the cross-rod 26 may be inclined to the plane 2, and the gripping arms 27, 27" then will similarly incline the work piece 29, so that'said work piece is moved laterally backwards to the plane of cut and inclined until the tangential plane of the edge of the work piece coincides with the cutting plane 2. Fig. 4 illustrates this position diagrammatically.

The gripping arms 27, 27 retain their hold of the work piece until the next opera tive catch 91 on the feeding chain 92 engages the work piece and feeds ittowards theshap ing tool 1 when it is seized by the press rollers 98 of'the edging machine which feedit past the tool 1. At this moment, the lever 63 is released, and gripping arm 27 is opened as already described, releasing the work piece which now will continue its forward motion without change in its lateral position; Until the arm 27" is freeof the work piece. the cross-rod 26 iscaused to follow the forward motion of the work piece. the movement being permitted by elongation of the slots or guides 24, 24 as diagrammatically indicated in Figs. 3 and 4. Having released the work piece, the cross-rod 26 ispushed back end-.

wise into its initial position by lever 63 as described, the levers 25 are pushed backwards by the eccentrics 36 taking with them the slides 22, 22".with the cross-rod 26; the la vers 19'. 19 are released. the ruler l3 moved to theright by theweights 17 and themachine is ready to receive the next work piece.

The embodiment of the invention now described and shown will be used when the work piece is pushed into the machine so far that the edge to be shaped passes the p ane of: cut 2, so that the work piece must be pushed backwards when theadjustment of'its position has been performed.

Fig. 5 illustrates another embodiment of the invention in which the work piece is stopped before its edge reaches the plane of cut. so that it mustbe pulled furtherinjto the machine when the adjustment of its position has otherwise been completed. To make the drawingmore simple only one row of selectOIS'IS shown in this embodiment, though here also two such rows can be used as in the termediate points 390, and the'lever ends 200 co-act with projections lO of slidesf42 on the side remote from the work piece; said pro jeetions having: points [41 in line with pivots I 390 and 210. "The slides-42 move in guides 43 in the slides 22 ext'ending'towa rds the work pie'ce29, 'and'springs 44tend to pull the slides a 22 towards thework piece, and so keep projections 40 incontact'with the ends 200 of the levers'190. v i

By means not shown; as levers actuated by eccentrics mounted ondriving shaft 37, the slide 42 can be'l'ocked ii. any desired position on slide 22 in similar way asdescribed for the previous embodiment. r 1 T The distances between the members 41210 and 390-210 are proportional to the dis'-' tancesbetween the selector points 10, 11 and the centre of their shaft 6: with the result that the 'points'4'1 will follow exactly the throws of the'sfelectors as transmitted to the for 1nst-ance by} ruler '13. The straight line which joins the two points 41 after deflection oft-he selectors willthus be parallel to the straightlinethat joins the 'twofselector points 10 which touchfthe tangential plane supposed to gointhe edge of the work piece. "Immediately thes deepest cavities have beenmeasured and thus the largest deflection of the points 41 reached, the slides 42 are locked to their. respective sl1de's'-22,' "the selectors4 are re-f moved from the work piece by"*thteffraine 30,-

and the work piece 29 is pulled laterally by the slides 22 further forward to the plane of cut 2 until the points '41 contact withfa stationary ruler 410 or'simila'r member parallel to th'e'line or planeof cut and'disposed at certaindistance fronrsaid plane. When the points 41 are stopped by the ruler 410,- the tangentialplane in tlie edge of thework piece has been moved so far to the right (in Fig. 5)

that" itcoincides with the plane2, and I the work piece is in due'position for shaping.

As already mentione'd, various modifications may be made in the constructional d'etails which cannot beshown nor mentioned here, our invention includes all the features which are setiforth in the accompany ingclaims, and the previous description .with drawings hasfonits single objectto exemplify how our invention canbe'materialized. "f f Having now particularly described and ascertained the nature of our said invention and'in what manner the same-is to be perfcrmedgwe declare that what we claim is:

1. lalechaniis n for governing-the position ing of lumber for operation 'by trimmin'i means ha ving a pr'edetermine'dtrimming plar 5' comprisinga series of'selectors and means for causing them-to'adapt themselves to a contourof a work piece, a second series of members and means for so' controlling the po'sitionof the latter'series' by the former means having a predetermined trimming" .plane, comprising a series of selectors and 19 means for causing them to adapt themselves to acontour of a work piece, a second series of members and means for so controlling the position of the latter series by the former series that they define an inverted facsimile 16 of the contour, registered by the selectors, and work piece positioning means controlled by the members of the second series operable to laterally shift and incline the work piece with reference to the trimmingplane, 80 3. Mechanism for governing the positioning of lumber for operation by trimming means having a predetermined trimming plane, comprising a series of selectors and 7 means for causing them to adapt themselves to a contour of a work piece, a second series of members and means for so controlling the position of the latter series by the former series that they define an inverted facsimile of the contourregistered by the selectors, a

- displaceable member moved accordingto the positioning of the second series of members,

and work piece positioning means controlled by said displaceable member for positioning the work piece with reference to the trimming plane.

4. Mechanism for governing the positioning of lumber for operation by trimming means having a predetermined trimming plane, comprising avseries of selectors and means for causing them to adapt themselves to-a contour of a work piece, a second series of members and means for so controlling the position of the latter series by the former series that they define an inverted facsimile of the contour registered by the selectors, a

i displaceable member moved laterally and inclined, with respect to the trimming plane, according to the positioning of the second series of members, and work piece positioning means controlled by said displaceable member and operable to laterally shift and incline the work piece with reference to the trimming plane and in accordance with the lateral shift and inclination of the displace- 5 able member.

5. Mechanism for governing the positioning of lumber for operation by trimming means having a predetermined trimming plane, comprising means for initially positioning a work piece in the mechanism, a series of selectors and means for causing them to adapt themselves to a contour of a work piece, a second series of members and means for so controlling the position of the es latter series by the former series-that they define an inverted facsimile of the contour registered by the selectors, and means for positioning said work piece with reference to said trimming plane, controlled by members of the second series.

6. Mechanism for governing the positioning of lumber for operation by trimming means having a predetermined trimming plane, comprising a shiftable gripping device for holding a work piece, a series of selectors and means for causing them to adapt themselves to a contour of a work piece, a second series of members and means for so controlling the position of the second series by the first series that they define an inverted facsimile of the contour registered by the selectors, and means for positioning the gripping device and the work piece engaged thereby with reference to said trimming plane, controlled by members of the second series.

7. Mechanism for governing the position ing of lumber for operation by trimming means having a predetermined trimming plane, comprising a series of selectors and means for causing said selectors to adapt themselves to a contour of a work piece, said selectors including work piece engaging members and a series of members adapted to define as inverted facsimile of the contour registered by the selectors, and means for positioning said work piece with reference to said trimming plane, controlled by the second mentioned members.

8. Mechanism for governing the positioning of lumber for operation by trimming means having a predetermined trimming plane, comprising a series of selectors and means for causing said selectors to adapt themselves to a contour of a work piece, said selectors including work piece engaging members and a series of members adapted to define an inverted facsimile of the contour registered by the selectors, a displaceable member moved according to the positioning of the second mentioned members, and work piece positioning means controlled by said displaceable member for positioning the work piece with reference to the trimming plane.

9. lVlechanism for governing the positioning of lumber for operation by trimming meansvhaving a predetermined trimming plane, comprising a series of selectors and means for causing said selectors'to adapt themselves'to a contour of a work piece, said selectors including work piece engaging members and a series of members adapted to define an inverted facsimile of the contour registered by the selectors, a member movable laterally of and at an inclinationwith respect to the trimming plane according to the positioning of the second mentioned members, and work piece positioning means controlled by said laterally movable member for means for so controlling the position of the second series by the firstseries' that they define an inverted facsimile ofthe contour registered'by the selectors, and means for positioningthegripping device and work piece carried thereby with reference to ,said- .trimming plane, controlled by :the'second seriesof members;

11. Mechanism for governing thetpositioning of lumber, for operation by trimming means having a predetermined trimming plane, comprising-a work piece gripping device movable laterally of and at an inclination with respect to the trimming plane, a series of selectors and meansfor causing the selectors to adapt themselves to a contour of a work piece, a second series of members and means for so controlling the position of the second series by the first series that they define an inverted facsimile of the contour registered by the selectors, adjustable stop members for limiting the movement of the gripping device, and means for positioning the stop members to arrest the movement of the gripping device and work piece carried there by, controlled by the members of the second series.

12. Mechanism for governing the positioning of lumber for operation by trimming means having a predetermined trimming plane, comprising a work piece gripping device movable laterally of and at an inclina tion with respect to the trimming plane, a series of selectors and means for causing the selectors to adapt themselves to a contour of a work piece a second series of members,

and means for so controlling the position of the second series by the first series that they define an inverted facsimile of the contour registered by the selectors, adjustable stop members for limiting the movement of the gripper device and the work piece carried thereby, means for positioning the stop member in accordance with the positioning of the members of the second series, and means to shift the gripper device into engagement with the stop members to position the work piece with reference to said trimming plane.

13. A mechanism as claimed in claim 1, characterized in that said selectors are arranged in groups with the selectors of each group pivoted for movement about a common axis substantially parallel to said trimming plane.

1 4. A mechanism as claimed in claim 1,-

characterized in thatsaid selectors'are arranged in groups with the selectorsof each group pivoted for movement about a common axis substantially parallel-to said trimming plane, each selector having projections located at different points fromthe pivotal axis thereof, the distance: between corresponding projectionsand the pivotal axis of the selector being the same throughout the selectorsof the several'groups.

.15: A mechanismas claimed in claim'l,

characterized in that said selectors are ar-z ranged in groups with the selectors of each grouppivoted for movement about a common axis substantially parallel to said trimming plane, and means for mutually adjusting the selectors of thefseveral groups. p Y

16. A mechanism as claimed in.claim-:1,

characterized in thatsaidselectors are: ar-

ranged in groups with the selectors of each group pivoted for movement about a common axis substantially parallel to said trimming plane, eachselector having projections located'at different points from the pivotal axis thereof, the distance between corre-, sponding projections and the pivotal'axis of the selector being the same throughout the selectors of the several groups, and means for mutually adjusting the selectors of the severalgroups vertically and horizontally.

17 Mechanismfor governing the posi tioning of lumber for operation by trimming means having a. predetermined trimmingplane,- comprising a plurality of groupsof selectorsand means for causing saidselectors to adapt themselves'tof a contour of .a work piece, the selectors ofthe several groups being adapted to engage the workpiece at dif-, ferent points, and groups of 'members associated with the groups of selectors. and means for controlling the position of the groups of members by the groups of selectors, whereby they define an inverted facsimile of thecontour registered 'bythe selectors, and means common to and controlled by both groups of members for positioning said work piece with reference to said trimming plane.;

18. Mechanism forgoverning the positioning of lumber for operation by trimming 'means .having a predetermined trimming plane, comprising a plurality-of groups of selectors' and means for causing said selectors to adapt themselves to'a contour of a work piece, the, selectors'of the several groups being adapted toengage the workpiece at dif ferent points,-an'd groups of members QSSO? ciatedwith' the groups ofselectors and means forcontrolling the position of the groups of members bythe groups-of selectors whereby theydefinean inverted facsimile of the contour registered by the selectors, and means common: to and controlled by both groups of members for positioning said work piece with. reference to, said trimming plane, the

ciated with the groups of selectors and means for controlling the position of the groups of members by the groups of selectors Whereby they define an inverted facsimile of the contour registered by the selectors, and means common to'and controlled by both groups of members for'positioning said Work piece with reference to saidtrimming plane, said last mentioned means including a member engagedby the groups of members and adjustable to correspond with the configuration of the work piece. 7

20. Mechanism for governing the positioning of lumber for operation by trimming means having a predetermined trimming plane, comprising a work piece gripping device movable laterally of'and at an inclination with respect to the trimming plane, a series of selectors and means for causing the selectors to adapt themselves to a contour of a workpiece, a second series of'members and means for so controlling the position of the second series by the first series that they define an inverted facsimile of the contour registered by the selectors, adjustable stop members for' limiting the movement of the gripper device and controlled by the second series of members, and means to secure the stop members in adjusted position following the positioning thereof.

21.- Mechanism for governing the positioning of lumber for operation by trimming means having a predetermined trimming plane, comprising a work piece gripping device m'ovable laterally of and at an inclination with respect to the trimming plane, a series of selectors and means for causing the selectors to adapt themselves to a contour of a workpiece, a second series of members and means for so controlling the position otthe second series by the first series that they define an'inverted facsimile of the contour registered by the selectors, means normally tending to move the gripper device and the work piece carried thereby, and'stop members for limiting the movement of the gripper device and controlled by the second series ofmembers. I

22. Mechanism for governing'the positioning'of lumber for operation by trimming means having a predetermined trimming p1ane,comprisin'ga work .piece'grippin'g device movable later'allycof and at an inclination with respect to" the trimming, plane, a series-of selectors andmeans for causing the selectors to adapt themselves to a contour of a work piece, a second series of members and means for so controlling the position of the second series by thefir'st series that they 'define an inverted facsimile of the contour registered by the selectors, means normally tending to move the gripper device and the work piece carried thereby, stop members for limiting the movement of the gripper device and controlled by the second series of members, and means normally holdingthe gripper device against movement and actuating to release'the latter following positioning of the stop members.

In testimony whereof we have aflixed our signatures. Y

EINAR F. soRENsE NIELS E. E. soRENsEN.

CERTIFICATE 01s CORRECTEON.

Patent No. 1,824,381. Granted September 22, 1931, to

ElNAR F. semzNseN ET AL.

It is hereby certified that error appears in the minted speeifieatian of the above numbered patent requiring cerreetien as fellews: Page 9, lines 73 and 91, claims 14 and 16, respectively, after the comma insert the weeds l'ae preportien of; and that the said Letters Patent should be read with these eerreetiahs therein that the same may conform to the record of the ease in the Patent ()ffiee.

Signed and sealed this 23rd day of February, A. l). 1932.

M. J. Moore, (Seal) Acting Cemmissioner el Patents.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4186310 *Jun 19, 1978Jan 29, 1980Maxey Carl WAutomatic wane detector
US4196648 *Aug 7, 1978Apr 8, 1980Seneca Sawmill Company, Inc.Automatic sawmill apparatus
US4204798 *Oct 31, 1977May 27, 1980Brewster Robert WAutomatic sawmill
US4333373 *Sep 30, 1980Jun 8, 1982Weyerhaeuser CompanyPositioning and feed system for cants and boards
US4386641 *May 8, 1981Jun 7, 1983Saab-Scania AktiebolagRetractable cant supports for lumber cant positioner-feeders
Classifications
U.S. Classification83/412, 83/364, 83/367
International ClassificationB27B31/00, B27B31/06
Cooperative ClassificationB27B31/06
European ClassificationB27B31/06