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Publication numberUS1826568 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 6, 1931
Filing dateMar 7, 1930
Priority dateMar 7, 1930
Publication numberUS 1826568 A, US 1826568A, US-A-1826568, US1826568 A, US1826568A
InventorsPelton George E
Original AssigneePelton George E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Supplying ink to inking ribbons
US 1826568 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

G. E. PELTON 1,826,568

Oct. 6, 1931.

SUPPLYING' INK TO INKING RIBBONS Filed vMarch 7, 1930 3 Sheets-Sheet l fim 2 m Q N Oct. 6, 1931. PELTON 1,826,568

SUPPLYING INK T0 INKING RIBBONS Filed March 7, 1950 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 I i- HM 1 pmw A; ATTOIRNEYS Oct. 6, 1931. G. E. PELTON 1,826,568

v SUPPLYING INK TO INKING RIB BONS Fi led March 7. 1930 s Sheets-Sheet 3 0 4 7 I 9 7/ a a 7 w 6 'INVENTO o m? .w I v 4 6 a mu m @4 4: M a E "w Patented Oct. 6, 1 931 PATENT OFFICE GEORGE E. PELTON, 0F HARTFORD; CONNECTICUT SUPPLYIN G INK TO INKING RIBBQNS Application filed March 7,

This invention relates to typing machines, and particularly to means for supplying ink to the inking or Writing ribbons of such machines while in use. l

Inking ribbons now in use have two se rious faults they cannot produce clear, sharp and uniform impressions throughout their life; and this life, at best, is a short one, necessitating frequent ribbon replacements. It is the universal experience of those using typewriters that the first impressions from a new ribbon are too black and heavy, the characters are not clear, and it is diflicult to erase without smudging. After the ribbon has been in service for several days, or a Week.tl1e actual time depending upon the extent and character of use and the original fir-k content of the ribbonthe excess ink is eliminated and the ribbon begins to produce satisfactory writing. But no sooner is this happy condition attained than the ribbon,

because of continued depletion of the ink supply, becomes incapable of producing a clear and legible impression, the characters are reduced to pale wraiths of their former selves, and the ribbon must be discarded. Thus the common typewriter ribbongives satisfactory results for not more than half its all too short life.

The reason forgthis is that inkin ribbons in use today are intended to perf orm and must perform two functions. Their first and primary function is to convey ink to the type, but their secondary, and no less important function from apractical poipt of view, is to act as supplyreservoirs for that ink. No ribbon can perform both of these functions eflicientl and the result is a compromise. The ribii on carries more ink at the outset than it should were excellence of impression the sole desideratum, but not so much as it should were long life the consideration of paramount importance. It is inpressions are of the deed possible, as is sometimes done, to make a ribbon having so little ink'that its first improper weight and color, but such a ribbon must be discarded so soon that its use is not practicable under average operating conditions. To go to the other extreme is out of the question. It is not' 1930. Serial No. 433,956.

commercially possible to make a ribbon carryi ng enough ink for several months normal use no matter how willing a manufacturer might be to sacrifice the quality of the first impressions. The practical resultis ashort-lived ribbon producing unsatisfactory, though perforce, passable impressions during the first and last periods of its use. Furthermore; when the common inking ribbon is used in the common way" the type must always strike into the ink supply carried by the ribbon in excess -of immediate requirements. This causes fouling of the .type, particularly when the ribbon is fresh and filled with ink, necessitating frequent cleaning of the type faces and impairing the quality of the typing.

It is, therefore, the object of the present invention to overcome these objectionable features inherent in the use of present day inking ribbons to the endthat clean, sharp impressions, not too heav and not too light, may be uniformly pro uced throughout the life of. the ribbon, the length of that life being determined primarily by the ability of the fabric to withstand wear and tear and not by its ink-carrying capacity. I have attained this object, in general, by the use of an inked secondar ribbon extending adjacent the inkingri bon proper-or writin'g ribbon as I .shall call it for sake of clearness-and movable with it, serving as an ink reservoir which continuously gives up its ink to the writing ribbon and maintains the ink content of the latter substantially constant and of the proper value. In this way the writing ribbon is confined to its own proper function of conveying ink to the type, while the other ribbon carries the ink reserve; thus the writing ribbon carries just enough ink to produce the desired quality of impression and its efficacy is unimpaired by a burden of excess ink. Moreover, as the ink content is maintained at the optimum value the im pressions do not become progressively lighter as the Writing ribbon gives up its ink.

' This secondary or ink-supplyin ribbon does not contactwith the type and oul them with excess ink, it merely carries a reserve of ink which it feeds to the writing ribbon'as the latter gives up its supply in typing. Only 100 the lightly inked writing ribbon, passing between the type and the surface to be typed, is

struck by the type, and it carries too little ink to foul them. In order that the supply rib bon shall .not be struck, I preferably separate the two. ribbons before the writing ribbon passes the point of impact, guiding the 'supply ribbon behind. the type and out of the,

g way. vI have, however, successfully employed a narrow supply ribbon which re-' mains always incontact with the writing rib- .bon but passes the impact point below the level of the type at that point.

' The ink-retarding face comprises a film coat- I It has been proposed to equip typing machines with small-inking pads contacting with the inking ribbon and serving as reser f voirs of ink. Experience has shown, how-' ever, that the ink suppliedby such pads cannot be regulated, asit must be for successful commercial operations, and such pads, if effective at all, transfer far too much ink to the ribbon. So far as I am aware no such auxiliary inking pads are in usetoday; l

have discovered that by employing an inked secondary ribbon to furnish ink to the writing ribbon and interwinding the two upon the same spools, a relatively lightcontact over an extended area is provided, just suflia cient to insure the proper'trans'fer of 'ink from the supply ribbon to the writing ribbon as the ink content of the latter is depleted.

InmyPatent No. 1,732,187, I have de-.

' scribed and claimed an inking-or writingribbon having an ink-retarding face portion designed to contact with the surface to be typed, and an ink-absorbent body portion.

ing of a cellulose ester, which serves, after drying, as a screen to retard the passage of ink from the ribbon under the impact of the type. "As I. have pointed out that patent,

'the'use of such an ink-retarding-coating con-.

- serves. the ink supply and produces a clean and uniform impression over a much longer period: than .is possible with typewriter ribbons now in common use; neverthelessatime comes. when the original inksupply is depleted, the impressions become too faint, and the ribbon must be discarded. "But when such a coated writing ribbon is used in con- ,n'ectioniwith the ink-supply ribbon ofthe present invention, its ink supply is not'depleted, and the impressions do not become faint,.because as the writing'ribbon gives up its ink in typing, fresh ink from the supply ribbon takes its place; this constant renewal ,ing ribbon, Thus, the present 'invention' makes poss ble a much more eflicient use of maintaining the ink content of the writing,

ribbon at its original value for an astonishingly long time-at least six to nine months with a ribbon of standard length under aver-- age operating. conditionswhich is more than twice the service which the same coated ribbon could give without the ink-supply with a supply ribbon, but the advantages inhering' in the use of a coatedwriting ribbon are so great that the use of any other iscnot recommended.

Only two factors determine the eifective life of the ink-regulating writing ribbonof my patent when used in combination with the ink-supplying ribbon of the present invention, and they are: the toughness or wearresistance of the writing ribbon fabric, and the quantity of ink carried by the supply ribbon, l I 7.

Now when the writing ribbon is relieved of performing its secondary function of providing an inkreserve and is built for the sole purpose of performing its primary function of transmitting tothe type just sufiicient ink for the best impression, it is possible to a the coating liquid is permitted to contact with the ribbon, as explained my pend- 1 ing application, Serial No. 337,820, and so- .can beincreased when desired. 1 have experienced no difficulty in forcing the link through this heavier ink -retarding section of the ribbon, while its presence greatly increases the toughnessof the ribbon, and in consequence ,its life. Furthermore, I ean employ a fabric chosen for its'toughness andgeneral excellence rather than its absorptivity, such as long-fibre. natural silk, av fabric -quite unsuited for. single ribbon use because 'itis incapable of holding much ink, but

admirablyxadaipted for use in connection with a supply ribbon because of its great toughness and its ability to take" a heavy cellulose coating, In addition long fibre silk produces a neater impression than spun silk or cotton-or any other fabric which has been proposed or used in typewriting, and

" doubtless would be used in present commercial practice were it possible for it. to carry an adequate ink supply. 7 My supply ribbon relieves it of thisnecessity.

Although I considera fabric of long fibre natural silk tobe the best forthe purpose,- other fabrics can be used with satisfactory results. Thusthe writing ribbon can be of spun'silk, as specified in my patent, or of a combinatlon of silk and cotton, the silk admirably as the supply ribbon and will furthreads constituting the Warp and the cotton the filling, or even of cotton alone, al I though an all cotton ribbon is inferior to one of silk or silk and cotton.

The other factor determining the effective life of my writing ribbonis the quantity of ink carried'by the supply ribbon. As the type do not strike the supply ribbon it can be chosen for its ink-absorbing qualities alone, and much heavier ribbons used than would be possible were they to act as writing ribbons as well as carriers of ink. Thus the actual quantity of ink carried can be determined with reference to the nature of the impression desired.

F or letter writing and calculating'machine work, a common cotton ribbon, such as is in every day use for writing purposes,.and carrying the same initial quantity of ink, serves nish adequate ink for from six to nine months. Spun silkor even paper may also be used for this class of "work For making heavy impressions, suchas are required for Writing checks, .an all wool ribbon which will absorb much more ink than the ordinary cotton rib; bon can be used. The wool may be woven or felted, or felted on a woven base. For bold work such as the recording of deeds, where bold neat impressions are required, but less ink than in check writing, combinations of wool with cotton or silk may be employed to advantage, the cotton or silk threads fornr ing the warp of the ribbon and the wool the filling. A plural or multi-ply ribbon may also *be used, holding ink between the plys.

Although the use of an ink-carrying supply ribbon alone' is siy flicientto prolong substantially the efliciei t life of the writing ribbon, I have found that an even longer life can be attained by the use of an ink reservoir for the supply ribbon itself. Moreover by regulating the feed of ink from the reservoir to the supply ribbon I can control the ultimate ink content of the writing ribbon and in that .Way determine the Weight and color of the impressions which any given ma-. chine will produce. Thus, as the supply rib- 3 bon is unwoundfromone spool and rewound upon-the other during normal machine operation I have produced satisfactory results by passing it in contact with an inking pad which continuously renews. the ink in the supply ribbon, the rate at which this renewal takes place being determined by the per- 'meability of the inking surface of the pad.

In this arrangement the supply ribbon acts as an-ink carrier between the pad and the writing ribbon, nicely controlling the quantity of ink thus transferred. When such an inking pad is employed the? ink-carrying capacity of the supply ribbon need-not be so great as when no pad is used. Thus a rubberized fabric might be used as the supply ribbon in connection with an inking pad.

terwound upon the same spools with the coated face of the fo mer contacting with the latter it is important that the ink fromthe supply ribbon should not offset on the cellu-' lose coating and be transferred to the paper.- With ordinary care in inking the supply ribbon no such offsetting will occur, but if very thin inks are used there may be a danger from this source. In order to obviate it I can employ a ,coated supply ribbon so interwound with the writing ribbon that the coated faces of the two are in contact. In this way the coated face of the inking ribbon which contacts with the paper to be typed isbraught into contact with the clean coated face of the supply ribbon. The ink is, therefore, fed to theinking ribbon through its uncoatcd back and the coated face remains relatively dry and-clean. As no ink should pass through the coated face of the supply ribbon, I prefer to make this face impervious to ink. As an alternative to a coated supply ribbon I may.

interpose a strip of celluloid, or other light flexible impervious material, between the writing and supply ribbons.

- It is quite possible to adapt existing typewriters to take the double-wound spools of the present invention. The writing ribbon passes from spool to spool and behind the type guide in the usual manner. The supply ribbon also passes from spool to spool but extends across the machine on the keyboard side I of the type. IVhere spool housings are employed, openings must be made for the supply rib-bon, and some means should also preferably be provided for guiding that ribbon from spool-to spool. Where 'an inking pad is used I mount it between the spools at the front of the machine frame and draw the supply ribbon across it.

i In the accompanying drawings I have illustrated two preferredembodiments of my invention as applied to two different makes of typewriter. In these drawings Figure l is a plan view, partly in section, of part of an Underwood noiseless typewriter equipped with the writing and ink-supplying ribbons of the present invention;"Figure 2 is an end view of the upper forward part of the ma chine illustrated in Figure 1; Figure 3 is an enlarged sectional detail taken along line 33 of Figure 1; Figure 4 is a plan view similar to Figure 1 showing a Royal typewriter equipped with a supply ribbon and an inking pad; Figure 5 is a transverse section taken mechanism of the Royal machine provided with the improvements shown in Figs. 4, '5 and 6, the ribbon feeding mechanism being shown as it. appears while'driving theuright hand spgol and unwinding the ribbonsffrom the left hand spool, the latter-spool being shown in this view vFig; 9, is a detail plan view looking down on the said Royal machine from therear, and

showing the ribbon feeding mechanismas'it hand spool to the common driving means to reverse the feed of the ribbons;

Fig. 10 isa fragmentary vertical section 'on the line .10110 of Fig. 8, showing the parts as positioned after part of the first turn of the right hand spool immediately following shift-- ing-of the common driving means from driv-'- ing connection with the left hand spool into driving connection with the right hand spool;

. :Fig. 11 is a section onthe line 1111 of -Fig.10; and 1 I Fig. 12'is a 'detailview similar-to Fig. 8,

with some of the parts of the-Royal machine 'omitted,- and showing part of theiribbon feeding mechanism as it appears at themstant of coupling the common driving means to the left hand spool, as in Fig. 9.

The typewriter illustrated in,Fig1'1res 1, 2

and 3 comprises a. frame 1 on. whichare' mounted theusual carriage carrying a platen 2, and a bank of type 8. Mounted upon the top of the frame 1 on either side -of the type are two ribbon spools i 'rotatablym'ountedupon pins 5. VY/h'env in use the spools are enclosed within their respective housings or guar'ds 6 each of which is provided with aperipheral, opening 8.- Wound upon these spools is aninking-or writing ribbon 7 wh1ch in passing'frormone spool to the other extends through the openings 8 and is threaded behlnd the ribbon guide 9. The paper 1Q, or other 7 material to be typed upon,=is woundlabout i from one spool and wound upon the other and 50, then rewou'nd, all in the usual way. The type th'eplat en in the usual wayand. passes beof impact of the type. During the operation of the machine the ribbon is slowly unwound mechanism ,is' enclosed within a hoodor casing 11. The foregoing is a very brief de-I scription of'parts of a standard Underwood noiseless typewriter and of itself forms no part of the present invention. g

, In accordance with the present nvention 'I provide an ink-supply ribbon' 12 interwound upon the spools with the writing ribbon The'writing ribbon is provided with a coating of a cellulose ester on the side co'ntactingwith the paper and the supply Ilbfi bon, may be of any of the materials, which I have alreadyspeCifiedL Within andjust behind the front wall of thetype casting 11 I have mounted an arcuate guide plate 13 I I: Q I spaced to permit the passage of the supply ribbon, asillustrated most clearly in Figure .3, The supply ribbon enters the space be- I tween the guide plate and-the front wall. I

V iintothe clip edgewise. I appears at the instant, of coupling the left through the openings 8 and behind the type guide 9 in} the usual manner. viT-he-easing 11 having first been removed, the sup-ply ribbon12lis passed through opening 15, inserted in the first guide clip 16, laid around the:

guide plat-e13 andpassed through the sec- A 0nd guide clip-16 and opening 15 to the writing ribbon. The forward -ends of the two are then secured to the empty spool in the usual manner. In ordinary typewriter ,operation the'spool" being wound is. positively driven and-the spool being unwqund rotated by means of the unwinding ribbon itself."

In order to relieve'ythe supply ribbon of as much strain as possible Ifprefer, when using the two ribbons of the present invention,to

Gil

efl 'ect the unwinding by means of the writ= 1 ing ribbon alone, as in ordinary single rib bon operation. In ordertoinsure this inode' of operation I leave a slight amount of slack in the supply ribbon when the two are .se 7

cured to the winding spooh; The drag exerted upon the supply ribbon by the arcuate guide plate 13 willbesuflicient to maintain a so taut that. section of the ribbon extending V I from the winding spool to the guide plate,

whereas the corresponding sectionbetween 1 the other'end of the guide platefand the'un-" the slack is shown adjacent the right-hand P Q v p, v

winding spool will beslack. .In Figure 1 the left-hand spool is the winding spool and Once. the ribbons are mounted upon the I I 'machine, as illustrated in-Figure 1, the operation is precisely as though there. were no supplyribbon present. As the typing proceeds the writing ribbon' is unwound from one spool and wound upon the other, movingin its passagefrom spool t q spool between" the type guide and the paper 'in the usual manner. Simultaneously with this movement of the writing ribbon the ink-supply ribbonis also unwound from one spool and'wound upon the other: As only a few inches of the writing ribbon extend between the two spools,j by far the greater part its .length'is always in ,intimatebontact with the supply-ribbon so that there isample opportunity for the transfer of the ink from the 4 supply ribbon to the writing ribbon, as the ink content of the latter is depleted.

The Royal typewriter. illustrated igures 4 and 5 comprises a frame 1 on which are mounted a platen 2', type 3', ribbon spools 4 on pins 5 enclosed within housing '6 having peripheral openings 8 and 15..

Wound upon these spools is a writing ribbon 7 which in passing from one spool to.

the other is threadedbehind a ribbon guide 9', and interwound with the writing rib-' bon is a supply ribbon 12. The paper 10 is wound about the platen inthe usual way. The foregoing parts correspond in general arrangement and function with the vcorrespondingly numbered parts shown in Figure 1. The machine shown, in Figures 4 and 5 differs, however, from the machine shown in Figure 1 primarily in the fact that here I have illustrated a'n inking pad 23 about which the secondary ribbon 12 passes as it is unwound from one spool and onto the other. V

In order that the intermittent movement of the ribbon and the feeding of the same from one .spool to the other may be clearly understood, the following description of the Royal ribbon mechanism, it is believed,- will be sufficient to enable any one versed in the art-to understand how the double ribbon is applied to this mechanism:

The left hand spool 31 and right hand spool 32-each has one end of each of the ribbons 7' and 12 attached thereto by the usual fasten ing ribbon end'fas'tening means 3.0. Spools 31 and 32 are held respectively on the'upper ends of vertical shafts 33 and 34 to turn therewith, which shafts are journalled in the main framework of the machine. A worm gear 35 is fixed on thelower end of shaft 33, and a bevel gear 36 is fixed on the lower end of shaft 34 and is in constant mesh with bevel gear 37 fixed on a transverse shaft 38 joure nalled in the machine framework. Adjacent the opposite end of shaft 38 and below gear 35, a worm .gear39 is fixed on said shaft. There is a common driving means shiftable for coupling-the same with eitherof the gears I 35 and 39.

To positively drive the left hand spool to reel the ribbons thereon, the common driving worm gear 40 is lifted and held in mesh with gear 35 as shown in Figs. 9 and 12; while to similarly drive the right hand spool to reel the ribbons thereon gear 40 is lowered and held in mesh with gear 39, as shown in Figs. 8 and 10. Gear .40 is always driven in the same direction, being fixed on the. forward end of a drive shaft 41 having a universal 'joint connection 42 at its rear end with a stub shaft 43 journalled in the framework.

A pinion 44 loose on shaft 43 meshes with gear 45 fixed on the platen carriage driving spring drum 46 which drawsthe platen carriage 48 to the leftthrough the medium of the usual draw band 55 attached to the drum and carriage. The leftward or letter spacing movement of the carriage is a step-by-step movement under control of the carriage escapement comprising the escapement wheel 56 controlled by the usual dogs on escapement rocker 57 pivoted at 58 to rock fore and aft, said rocker being normally held as in Fig; 8 by a suitable spring and being tripped on the down stroke of each type key .by a tappet 59 on the universal bar frame which strikes the lower end of the rocker. Drum 46, gear 45 and pinion 44 ,thus rotate slightly at each printing operation to intermittently feed the ribbons. Pinion 44 always turns in the same direction, remaining stationary during rightward or return movements of the carriage, by reason of said pinion being clutched to shaft 43 by the usual one-Way driving clutch 47 to drive the shaft only dur ing leftward movements of the carriage.

The universal bar frame 49 swings forward about a transverse shaft 50 from the normal position shown in Fig. 8 on the down stroke of each type key, each of the typebars ,51 of the machine being actuated to print by its associated key through the medium of a link 52, which link rocks the universal bar frame forward through the medium of a draw link 53 attached thereto and hooked around the universal rod or bar 54 of said frame.

In Fig. 8 the ribbon feed mechanism is set.

to drive the left hand'spool, upon which the 1 ribbons are shown partly wound Pivoted on each spoolis a ribbon feed reversing trip device comprising an elbow lever 60, the upper arm of which is normally held against the spool barrel, by the convolutions of the ribbons wound about said barrel, to normally hold the lower laterally extending arm of said elbow lever in an inactive position.

The operation of thefeed mechanism is not changed by the presence of the added ribbon.

With the parts set as in Fig. 12, when spool .31 becomes substantially full and the last said shaft having an upright arm or l'ever 64 fixed on its left hand end andconnected by link 65 with the upper armof a lever 66" pivoted on the framework on pivot 67. The

lower" arm of lever 66 carries a 'roller 68 which is moved over a cam 69 (fixed on tiltable drive shaft 41) when arm 62 is cammed rearward by device 60 wiping ever cam extension 61 of arm 62. As shaft 41' turns, cam

69 engages roller 68 and forces the forward end of shaft 41' down until worm 40 is disengaged from gear 35 arid engaged with gear ,39, and the ribbons begin to reel up upon the h framework 88 at 89 and normallyheldin the right'hand spool as shown in' 10, where the first ribbon convolution is being wound spool 31 drops down as shown in Fig, 12 andon spool 32 and is about to again lift ,trip

device 601on said spool into-inactive position.

- When'the ribbons are substantially fullywound on spool 32 and substantially fully unwound from spool 31, trip device 60 on wipes over the front face of a cam extension 70 (similar to extension 61) formed on. the upper arm of an upright lever 71, which lever is alsopi'voted on the pivot 67 1 above referred to. The resultant rocking of lever71 carries.

a roller 72 on the lower end of said lever under the cam 69, and continued operation of-the machine causes cam- 69' to raise the forward end of shaft 41 until worm 40 is disengaged from gear 39 and engaged with gear 35, as'shown in Fig.12, thus again r'e-.. versing the direction of feed of the ribbons.

The upper ends of arm 62 and lever. 71 are normally yieldably heldforward by springs 73 and 7 4, respectively, against parts 75 and 76, respectively, ofthe main framework of the machine, in which position the raised trip devices60 on the spools travel above the cam extensions 61 and 70 duringrotation of the spools, as indicated in the case of the trip device on spool32 in Fig. 9 and the trip device on spool '31- in Fig. 8. In Figs. 9 and e 12 trip device 60 on spool 31 is shown lowered and bearing against the front face of cam ex- .dl.i ve the spool 31.

tension 70, in the position of these parts at the completion of coupling the worm to Tiltable drive shaft 41 is yieldably latched in each of its two spo l drivingpositions by "in which the ribbon covers the printing sides-of cam nose 81 on the upper e latch .arm 82,which arm is pivoted on the an automatic latch. A bell crank lever. 78 pivoted at 79 on the machine framework has shaft 41 journalled in its laterally extending arm and has a roller '80 on-its upwardly extending arm. Roller 80 duringthe raising 'at the rear of the type guide, from the'noiav mal 'lowered position uncovering the printing point shown in Ei 8, to a raised-position point on the front of platen 2'. The vibrator is pivoted at its lower-end to the forwardly extending arm. of a bell crank lever. 87 plvoted on theusual carriage supporting position shown in-F-ig. 8 by spring 90. To

lift the vibrator and interpose the writing ribbon as usual between the type and platen whena type bar 51 makes its printing stroke,

the pendent arm of bell crank 87 is pivoted to a fore-and-aft reciprocable actuating bar -91 the front end of which is suspended from framework 88 by link 92 and the rear end of' which is engaged and pushed forward, on the printing stroke/of each type bar, by a tappet 93 that moves forward and rearward with the universal'bar frame 49. v

To prevent any possible accidentalreverse rotation of worm 40 and shaft 41 during return or rightward movements of the platen carriage, a ratchet wheel 94 fixed on said spring-pressed pawl 95 pivoted on bell crank 78, as usual.

This inking pad 23 comprises a Segment- -.face.- This covering may be a coatedfabricidentical with or similar to the writing ribshaft is held against reverse rotation by a bo'n itself placed with its coated face outermost. The ink fed from the pad to the inkv supplying ribbon must pass through this fabric which must therefore be pervious to ink.

', The rate at which the ink passesfrom the pad to the; supply ribbon is determined by the permeability of the pad fabric and this affords me a means for controlling the ultimate ink -content of the inking ribbon. Thus'for' a typewriter equipped with pica type fer letter writing I cover the inking pad with afabric heavily coated with pyroxyli'n or with a plurality of coated fabrics so that relatively little ink is pickedup by' the supply ribbon. On the other hand, amachine equipped with Gothic type for billing andsimilar heavy Work should'have a pad'covered with but a single thickness of a ylightly .coa'ted fabric permitting of a heavy ink discharge. In any case,'however, the amount of ink carried by the writing ribbon is constant so that the weight'and color of impression decided upon .shall be maintained uniform as long 'as desired. r

In Figure 7 I have illustrated both the Writing ribbon 7 and the supply ribbon 12 provided with an ink-retarding coating 26 comprising pyroxylin, as described in I. my Patent No. 1,7 32,187 The coated face of the writing ribbon faces the platenand so contacts with the paper during typing, the ink being forced from the ribbon through the coating by. the type. The uncoated side of the ink -supplying ribbon yields the (ink, and where a pad is used this uncoated side passes 1 across the inking pad23 and absorbs 'inktherefrom; When the two ribbons come together, as they do when wound upon the spools their uncoated faces are in opposition and contact with each'other By virtue-of this arrange: ment th iiik carried by the supply ribbon is transferred directly to the uncoated and ab ribbon. ;I{igure 7 is only diagrammatic. It

must not be considered as accurately illustrating the relations between the coating and I the fabric of the ribbon.

Although I have illustrated a pad as a suit able means for supplying ink to the supply ribbon, other means such as rollers contacting with both an ink supply and the supply ribbon might be used. r

Among the many advantages inherent in the following may be noted:

Uniform excellence of type impression can be had over a period of use longer than is otherwise possible with now available.

The effective ribbon life is increased many fold thereby avoiding frequent changings.

Any character of impression desired "can be had, and once chosen can be uniformly produced. Q I

As the type do not strik into the ink supply, fouling is minimizedand cleaningof the type becomes infrequent.

Strong, tough, heavilycoated fabrics such as long fibre natural silk,'capable of producing the clearest and best impressions can be used as the Writing ribbon despite the fact that such fabrics are incapable of carrying more than a-very small quantity of ink. The present invention was conceived primarily for use in connection with typewriter ribbons and will doubtless find its largest field of usefulness there. but in its broader aspects it is clearly applicable wherever the ,problem arises of obtaining an ample, cont-inuous and uniform ink feed from an inking ribbon, as in weighing machines, multigraphing machines, adding and accounting machines, cash registers, time recorders, and' all typing or printingmachines in which ink for the impression is furnished by'a ribbon interposed between the surface typedupon I back. and forth. past the common writingand the type. I p

Iclaim: I Y I 1. A method of operating a writing machine comprising feeding a wrlting ribbon point, forcing ink step by step from a part of said ribbon as.each type strikes the ribbon while maintaining said writing ribbon ply ribbon.

and an ink supply .ribbon in ink transfer effecting contact.

ink in a writing ribbon which comprises maintainin said writing r1bbon, in ink transfer etfiacting contact, with an 1nk sup- 3. The method of operating a' writingmachine which comprises maintaining two.

the improvements of the present invention I sald writlng ribbon and said ribbons carrythe best equipment ribbon, and contactin 2. The method of keeping a supply of' able ribbon guides, 21/ writing ribbon, an ink supply ribbon, said ribbons being interwound by rotation of the spools, the writing ribbon being capable of renewing its ink supply by absorption while interwound with the ink supply ribbon.

5. Ink supply means for use in writing comprising a feed spool, a writing ribbon fastened to said spool and an ink suppl ribbon almost entirely interwound with the ing ink.

6: In a printing apparatus having impresfor transfer of ink'to each portion of the writing ribbon from which ink is expelled.

7. In a printing. apparatus havin 1mpression formlng means, a .wrlting ribbon,

and means for presenting saidribbon for ink expulsion therefrom at a different point operation of the apparatus, the combination.

with said ribbon of an ink supply ribbon associated therewith for direct transferof ink from the latter ribbon to the writing-ribbon writing ribbon at all times without presenting the ink supply ribbon for ink expulsion th'crefromby the typing apparatus.

8. In a printing apparatus having impression forming devices, an impression writing ribbon from which ink is expelled by impression forming actions of said devices, and ribbon controlling means presenting .said ribbon for ink expelling action thereon by said devices, progressively, substantially from end to end of the ribbon'and back-again alternately, the combination with said devices, ribbon and means, of a flexible ink carrier supplyingink to said" writing with same, substantiallyfrom end to' en p 9. A printing apparatus having an ink supply ribbon, a writing ribbon capable of absorbing ink from the ink supply ribbon,

spools with which said ribbons are connected for interwinding of the said ribbons face to face on either spool, typing means coactive with the writing ribbon, and means coactive in its length at each impression forming substantially throughout the'length of the 4 with the ink supply ribbon. as it extends from spool to spool permanently withholding the ink supply ribbon from the field of action'of said typing means.

10. In a typewriting machine having keycontrolled type movable to the common printing point, the combination with said types of means for formin the type im-f pressions comprising two ri bons carrying ink, a pair of ribbon feed spools with which said ribbons are connected for reeling of the ribbons upon first one spool and then the other with the ribbons in direct inlntransfer effecting face contact while wound on the pools, and means, for presenting one of said ribbons at the'common printing point and holding said other ribbon out of the path of the types.

11. A typewriting machine of the kind wherein a. writing ribbon carrying ink is presented at the printing point for expulsion of ink by type and is reeled step by step for substantially its full length first on one-and then on the other spool, and wherein is provided a supply ribbon which interwinds with the impression writing ribbon on each spool without the ink supply ribbon being acted upon by the types during operation of the machine. 1

12. A typewriting machine having types controlled to write at the common printing point, two ribbons carrying ink, and means controlling said ribbons" for ink expulsion. by thetype at the common printing point solely from the writing ribbon andfor ink intervals of time to cause said supply ribbon to replenish ink transferred from said writing ribbon to a writing surface.

14. The combination of a pair of ink ribbons, one of which serves to transfer ink to a writin surface and the other of which supplies ink to-the first mentioned ribbon when contacting therewith for substantial intervals of time. I

15. The combination of a writing ribbon wh ch serves to transfer ink to a writing surface, and an inksupply member of absorptive material carrying asupply of ink, said writing ribbon contacting with said supply member during substantial intervals of time to supply ink to the transfer member .by capillary absorption 16. The combinatlon of a writing ribbon -whch serves to transfer ink to a writing surface and an ink supply member of absorptive material carrying a'supply of semi-liquid slow flowing ink, and means for bringing said writing ribbon into contact with said supply memberduring substantial intervals 4 V of time sufficient to enable said slow flowing ink to pass from said supply member to said writing ribbon by capillary action.

17 In a typing machine, the combination of a writing ribbon, and flexible ink supplying means movable with the writing ribbon, v

for supplying ink to sgid ribbon while in use in predetermined quantity for any size or style type. i

18. Ina typing machine, the combination of ahigh threadcount, thin, long wear writing ribbon and a cheap grade low thread count ink supplying ribbon contacting with the writing ribbon and feeding ink thereto in predetermined quantity while the writing ribbon is in use for any size or style type.

19. An ink pad includinga base portion of a material capable of carrying ink, and-a coating associated therewith for-retarding the flow of ink therethrough from said base to type or ribbons,or other articles.

20. An ink pad including a base portion of a material capable of carrying ink and having a surface thereof exposed o deliver ink,

and .a coating associated with said surface I to. control the passage of ink therethrough to type or ribbons, or otherv articles.

21. An ink pad including a base portion'of a material capable of carrying ink, said pad having associated with the exposedpsurface a composition permeable to ink and through which the ink passes from the base to type or ribbons, or other artigle's, said composition retarding excessive passage of ink therethrough.

22. An ink pad including a base portion of a material capable of carrying ink, said pad having a cellulose composition permeable to ink associated with the exposed surface thereof and which permits a restricted flow of ink from said base to type or ribbons or other articles contacting with'saidexposed surface.

23. An ink pa-d including a base which is capable of carrying ink, a thin cover through I which ink may pass, a composition permeable to ink and appliedto saidcovelr, and through which ink may pass from the base in a re-' strlcted manner to type or ribbons or other.

articles. e

24. An-ink pad including a base which is capable of carrying ink, and a covering material contacting with said base and impregnated with a composition'permeableto ink, and regulating'a's desirdthe amount of ink passing therethrough,

capable of carrying ink, and acov ng m terialwhiclr arranged onaporti of said base and permeabletoink'and-gwhic pregnated with compositionis' i 25. An inkp'a'd'ncluding a base which is the material' tenets I a; screen or filter and i retard the p a s'sagefof' terial; y

n l pa mpn ngi n rea sess.

iao

base and a chemical coating-associated there- ;vith regulating the passage of ink from said ase.

.27. Anink pad comprising'an ink-carrying base and ,an ink-pervious chemical coating on the operative face of the-padthrough which the ink is passed in restricted amounts to ar-' ticles contacting therewith.

28. An ink pad comprising an ink-carrying baseand an ink-perviouscoatingof a cellulose ester associated therewith regulating the passage of ink therethrough.

' 29. An ink padcomprising an ink-carrying base and an ink-pervious covering coated with a cellulose ester on the operative face of the pad through whichthe ink is passed 'in restricted amounts to articles contacting therewith.

- 30. In a typing machine, the combination of a writing ribbon, and an ink-supply ribbon contacting with the writing ribbon throughout the major portion of its length and feeding ink to it. A

.31. In a typing machine, thecombination of a writing, ribbon carrying the optimum quantity of ink for the character ofimpression desired, and an ink-supplying ribboncontacting with the writing ribbon and feeding ink to it while in use in order to maintain the ink .content of the writing ribbon at the redetermined optimum value.

32. na typing machine, the combination 1 of a writing ribbon, means for moving the writing. ribbon to'present a fresh area to toe type, and an ink supply ribbon contactingwith the'ink ribbon and movable with it.

33. In a typing machine, the combination of a writing ribbon, a ribbon for supplying inkthereto, spools upon -which the two ribv bons are interwound, means for unwinding the ribbons from one spool and winding them upon another during the operation of the machine, the writing ribbon-in its passage from one spool to another being interposed between the type an'dthe surface to be typed, and means for guiding the ink supply ribbon away fromthe type and the surface to be typed as it passes from one spool to the other.

v 34. .A typing machine comprising the combination of a bank of type, a platen for supporting the paper or other material to betyped, mechanism for causing the type to" strike against the paper, awriting ribbon interposed betweenthe paper and the type at the point of impact, spools u on which the ribbon is wound, mechanism or unwinding the ribbon from one spool, moving it past the point ofimpact and winding it upon another spool, and an ink supply ribbon interwound with the writing ribbon likewise moved from one spool to another but not between the paper and the type at the point of impact.

35. In a typing machine, the combination of spools, a-writing ribbon and an ink supply ribbon interwound 'on said spools, and

housings for the spools, each spool housing having two peripheral openings, one for the writing ribbon and one for the ink-supply ribbon.

36. In a typing machine, the combination of. a writing ribbonlhaving an absorbent body portion and an ink-retarding face portion, and means for supplying ink to the absorbent body portion of the writing ribbon while in the type and the surface to be typed with the ink-retarding face portion adjacent the surface to be'typed, and means for supplying ink to the absorbent bodyportion of the writing ribbon while in use in the machine.

39. .ln a typing machine, the combination of a writing ribbon having an absorbent body portion and an ink-retarding face portion,

means .for moving the writing ribbon between the type and the surface to be typed with the ink-retarding face portion adjacent the surface to be typed, and an ink supply ribbon contacting with the 'absorbent body portion ofthe writing ribbonand movable therewith.

40. In a typing machine, the combination of a writing ribbon having an ink-retarding face portion, and an ink-supply ribbon interwound with the writing ribbon and feeding ink to it.

41. In a typing machine, the combination of a writing ribbon having an ink-retarding face portion, an ink-supply ribbon -interwound with the writing ribbon and feeding ink to it, and means preventing thetransfer of excess ink from the ink-supply ribbon to the inkretarding face. of the writing ribbon.

42. In a typing machine, the combination of a writing ribbon having an absorbent body portion and an ink-retarding face portion, means for moving the writing ribbon between the typeand the surface to be typed with the ink-retarding face portion adjacent the surface to be typed, and an ink-supply ribbon likewise having an absorbent body portion and an ink-retarding face portion, the absorbent body portions of thetwo ribbons contacting with each other.

43. In a typing machine, the combination pression desired, an ink-supply ribbon contacting with the writing ribbon and feeding ink to it while in use in order to maintain the ink content of the writing ribbon at the predetermined optimum value, and an ink of a writing ribbon carrying the optimum quantity of ink for the character of imreservoir which gives up ink to the ink-supply ribbon. v I n 44. In a typing machine, the combination of a writing ribbon, means for moving the .writing ribbon to present a fresh area to the type, an ink-supply ribbon contacting with the writing ribbon, and an ink reservoir which gives up ink to the ink-supplyribbon.

45. In a typing machine, the combination of a writing ribbon, means for moving the writing ribbon to present a fresh area to the type, an ink-supply ribbon contacting with the writing ribbon and movable with it, ink reservoir which gives up ink to the ink-supply ribbon as itmoves, and means for controlling the feed of ink from the ink reservoir to the ink-supply ribbon.

46. In a typing machine, the combination of a writing ribbon, means for moving the writing ribbon between the type and the surface to be typed, an ink-supply ribbon contacting with the writing ribbon and movable with it, and an inking pad contacting with the ink-supply ribbon.

47. In a typing machine, the combination of a Writing ribbon, means for moving the writing ribbon between the type and the surface to be typed, an ink-supplyribbon contacting with the writing ribbon and movable with it, an ink reservoir which gives up inkto the ink-supply ribbon and an ink.- retarding element interposed between the inkreservoir and said ink-supply ribbon,- controlling the feed of ink. from the ink-reservoir vto the ink-supply ribbon.

.48. .In a typing machine, .the combination of a wound writing ribbon, an ink-supply ribbon interwound With it, an inking pad, and

means for unwinding the two ribbons during-the operation of the machine, passing the writing ribbon between the type and the surface to be typed and passing the inksupply ribbon over the inking pad.

4:9. In a typing machine, the combination of'a writing ribbon, a ribbon for supplying ink thereto, a pair of spools upon which the two ribbons are interwound an inking pad, and means for unwinding the ribbons from one spool and winding them u on the other, the writing ribbon in moving rom one spool to the other passing between the type and he surface to be typed while the supply rib- )on passes in contact with the ink ng pad. 50. A typewriting machine, comprising the combination of a bank of type, a platen'for supporting the paper or other material to betyped, mechanism for causing the type to strike against the paper, a writing ribbon interposed between the paper and the ,6 type at the point of impact, an inking pad,

an ink-supply ribbon, spools upon which both ribbons are interwound, and mechanism for unwindingthe ribbons from one spool and winding them upon another, the writwas in its passage from spool to spool while the ink-supply ribbon moves in contact with the inking ad.

51. n a typing machine, the combination of a writing ribbon having an absorbent body portion and an ink-retarding face portion, an 7 ink reservoir, an ink-supplying ribbon likewise having an absorben body portion and an ink-retarding face po ion, the absorbent body. portions of both ribbons contacting with each other, means for moving the writing ribbon between the type and the surface to be typed with its ink-retarding face adj acent' the surface to be typed and for causing. the I ink-supply ribbon to fake up ink from the reservoir, and an ink-retarding element interposed between the reservoir and the ink supply ribbon controlling the feed of ink from the reservoir to the ink-supplyribbon.

53. A typewriter ribbon spool having wound thereon a writing ribbon carrying relatively little ink and an ink-supplyingribbon carrying a relatively'greater quantity of ink interwound with the writing ribbon.

wound thereon a writing ribbon of long fibre natural silk and an ink-supplying ribbon contacting withthe writing ribbon and feeding ink to it:

55. A typewriter ribbon spool having wound thereona writing ribbon of long fibre natural silk having an ink-retarding face portion of a cellulose ester and an-ink-supplying ribbon .interwound with the Writing ribbon and feeding ink to it.

54. A typewriter ribbon spool having 56. A typewriter ribbon spool having interwound'thereon a Writing ribbon and an inksupplying. ribbon.

57. A typewriter ribbon spool having interwound thereon a writing ribbon having an ink-retarding'face portion, and an ink-supplying ribbon.

58. A typewriter ribbon spool having interwound thereon a writing ribbon having an ink-retarding face portion of acellulose ester, and an ink-supplying ribbon. v

In testimony whereof I aflix my signature;-

. GEORGE E. PELTON.

0 ing ribbon moving past the point of impact

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4707155 *Dec 24, 1985Nov 17, 1987International Business Machines CorporationRe-inkable ribbon transport system
US5054943 *Apr 19, 1990Oct 8, 1991Cheng Wei TRibbon inking apparatus and printer cartridge
Classifications
U.S. Classification400/199, 400/241.3, 400/241.4
International ClassificationB41J31/14, B41J31/16
Cooperative ClassificationB41J31/16
European ClassificationB41J31/16