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Publication numberUS1827549 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 13, 1931
Filing dateJan 31, 1930
Priority dateJan 15, 1930
Publication numberUS 1827549 A, US 1827549A, US-A-1827549, US1827549 A, US1827549A
InventorsVillain Ena
Original AssigneeVillain Ena
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Manufacture of transparent soap tablets containing advertisements
US 1827549 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 13, 1931. vlLLAlN 1,827,549

MANUFACTURE OF TRANSPARENT SOAP TABLETS CONTAINING ADVERTISEMENTS Filed Jan. 31, 1930 com w AMERWA BY USA. UN

Byaixffif Patented Oct. 13, 1931 UNITED STATES ENA VILLAIN, OF DUL'W'ICH, LONDON, ENGLAND MANUFACTURE OF TRANSPARENT SOAP TABLETS CONTAINING ADVERTISEMENTS Application filed January 31, 1930, Serial No. 424,771, and in Great Britain January 15, 1930.

This invention relates to the manufacture of transparent soap in bar or tablet form (hereinafter called tablets) containing embedded at the middle thereof a piece of paper, metal, cardboard or the like bearing on one or both sides thereof any desired word, name or picture such as a trade mark or advertisement for example (hereinafter referred to as advertisements).

According to the presentation, the advertisement is enveloped in a transparent en velop of very thin sheet of cellulose sulphate, a basic tablet of transparent soap is made with a depression in the top face extending to the medial plane thereof, the envelope advertisement is laid on the bottom of the depression, then, after Warming up the basic tablet to soften it, the depression is filled up with molten transparent soap of the same kind as the basic tablet, and finally the whole is compressed by means of the soap press to form the complete tablet.

The transparent envelope of very thin sheet cellulose sulphate is for the purpose of protecting the advertisement from the action of the ingredients of the soap.

The depression may be formed in the top surface of a complete tablet by means of a correspondingly shaped die and means may be provided to enable a number of basic tablets to be formed simultaneously, the depressions to be simultaneously filled up with molten soap after the advertisements are laid therein, and the complete tablets to be simultaneously formed by a corresponding numher of soap presses.

The process according to the invention is illustrated by way of example by the accompanying drawings of which,

Fig. 1 is a cross-section of a mold with a basic tablet therein, and a die thereon in the act of forming the depression.

Fig. 2 shows in cross-section the mould with the basic tablet therein, after the enveloped advertisement has been laid in the depression, and a reservoir above containing the molten soap for filling up the depressions.

Fig. 3 shows in cross-section the filled up tablets being compressed in a soap press.

Figs. l and 5 show, in perspective, top and bottom views of one finished tablet of tran parent soap, in which the embedded envelope of cellulose sulphate cont-ainin advertisement AVA is visible on the top 0? the tablet; and on the bottom of the tablet there is visible, in the same envelope, the same name AVA, so arranged as to be read in four different directions.

Figs. 6 and 7 show, in perspective, two tablets of transparent soap, each containing one advertisement different from the other, and each embedded in an envelope of cellulose sulphate.

In the example shown in the drawings, a basic tablet of transparent soap, lying in a mould 2, has a depression 3 formed in the top surface by means of a correspondingly shaped die 4: (Fig. 1) and extending to the medial plane of the basic tablet. The advertisement 5 contained in an envelope of cellulose sulphate is then laid on the bottom of the depression 3. After warming up the basic tablet to soften it, the depression 3 is filled up with molten transparent soap 6 of the same kind as the basic tablet from a reservoir 7 through a pipe 8 which can be opened and closed by atap 9. Finally the whole is compressed by means of the soap press 10 (Fig. 3) to form the complete tablet which may have the appearance of the tablets 8 shown in Figs. 4 to 7 A number of moulds such as 2, a number of dies such as 4-, presses such as 10 and pipes in the reservoir, such as 8, may be provided and so arranged as to enable a number of basic tablets to be formed simultaneously, the depressions to be filled up simultaneously with molten soap, and the complete tablets to be simultaneously formed by the soap presses.

Y I claimp- A process for making a transparent soap tablet with an advertisement embedded therein, comprising enveloping said advertisement in a transparent envelope of very thin sheet cellulose sulphate forming a basic tablet of transparent soap With a depression in'the top face extending to the medial plane of said basic tablet, laying the enveloped advertisement in the bottom of said depression,

7 warming up said basic tablet to soften it,

filling up said depression with molten transparent soap of the same kind as the transparent soap constituting said basic tablet,

and finally compressing the Whole by means of the soap press to form the complete tablet.

' ENA VILLAIN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2518423 *Oct 4, 1945Aug 8, 1950Maria Jenett Caroline LouiseMethod of packaging
US2923035 *Aug 3, 1956Feb 2, 1960Empire Brushes IncMethod for molding plastic articles
US3072973 *Apr 24, 1959Jan 15, 1963Barnette Stanley RonaldMethod of making cast plastic laminates
US3249971 *May 22, 1963May 10, 1966Barber Greene CoMolding process for manufacture of cast bars
US3320345 *Feb 15, 1965May 16, 1967Howmet CorpMethod for the production of cored patterns
US3328500 *Jan 14, 1963Jun 27, 1967Barnette Stanley RonaldMethod of making self-reinforced plastic articles
US4279854 *Jul 25, 1979Jul 21, 1981Henry BlaszkowskiMethod and apparatus for forming soap bars with an embedded insert
US4504433 *Aug 24, 1982Mar 12, 1985Pola Chemical Industries, Inc.Process for preparation of soap articles containing dried shapes of soap
US5183429 *Jul 31, 1991Feb 2, 1993Bitton Mary KChildren's toy and bath soap assembly
US5472545 *Aug 17, 1994Dec 5, 1995Malki; JehudaMethod for affixing labels to soap bars and labeled soap bars produced thereby
US5653933 *May 12, 1995Aug 5, 1997Lever Brothers Company, Division Of Conopco, Inc.Method of using angled soap dies
US5869437 *Oct 29, 1996Feb 9, 1999Wolfersberger; Donna J.Dissolvable polymer material embedded at the mid-point of the bar
US6107262 *Jul 19, 1997Aug 22, 2000Noble, Ii; David S.Pouring molten soap into receiving portion of taut transparent wrap; cooling molten soap in contact with the stretchable wrap; repeating where an indentation fomed in soap from previous pour forms receptacle for more soap
US6136764 *Jun 15, 1998Oct 24, 2000Bitton; Mary KayDecorative soap with Embedded Dissolvable Image Layer
US6184191 *Sep 22, 1998Feb 6, 2001Donna J. WolfersbergerTransparent soap with printed logo
US6238612 *May 14, 1998May 29, 2001Lever Brothers Company, Division Of Conopco, Inc.By applying pressure to a detergent composition in a fluid or semi-solid state contained within a mold cavity, which is full before pressure is applied
US6455478Oct 18, 2000Sep 24, 2002Mary Kay BittonDecorative soap with embedded dissolvable image layer and further comprising toy or figurine
US6689728Apr 6, 2001Feb 10, 2004The Dial CompanyComposite transparent bar soap containing visible soap insert(s)
US6720296Sep 24, 2002Apr 13, 2004Mary Kay BittonDecorative soap with embedded liquid image layer and further comprising a toy or figurine
US7163101Oct 30, 2003Jan 16, 2007William Anthony HarperFlexible liquid packet with rigid insert
US7322465Jun 12, 2006Jan 29, 2008William Anthony HarperMethods of using liquid packets with advertising inserts
USRE38946 *Jan 30, 1995Jan 24, 2006Bitton Mary KChildren's toy and bath soap assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification510/143, 206/819, 264/275, 428/13, 40/635, 264/255, 510/440, 510/147, 264/325
International ClassificationC11D17/00, C11D17/04, C11D13/00
Cooperative ClassificationC11D13/00, C11D17/0095, Y10S206/819, C11D17/04
European ClassificationC11D13/00, C11D17/00K, C11D17/04