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Publication numberUS1828193 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 20, 1931
Filing dateAug 24, 1928
Priority dateAug 24, 1928
Publication numberUS 1828193 A, US 1828193A, US-A-1828193, US1828193 A, US1828193A
InventorsLevin Harold L
Original AssigneeFlintkote Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Laminated flooring
US 1828193 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 20, 1931. H'. L. LEvIN I LAMINATED FLOORING Filed Aug. 24

INVENTOR rraBY.az/zw ATTORNEY Patented Oct. 20', 1931 UNITED .STATES PATENT OFFICE HAROLD L. LEVIN, OF NUTLEY, NEW JERSEY, ASSIGNOR TO THE FLINTKOTE COMPANY, 0F BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS, A CORPORATION OF MASSACHUSETTS LAMINATED FLOORING Application filed August 24, 1928. Serial No. 301,893.

This invention relates to an improved form of flooring or the like made from a laminated structure having a wear surface composed of individual tile or tile-like elements, or of material treated so as 'to simulate the appearance of individual tiles.

My invention has for one of its objects the provision of flooring material constructed of a base or foundation having superposed thereon and affixed thereto a layer of tiles or tile-like elements, or material finished so as to give anlappearance of individual tiles, the foundation layer being relatively large in comparison to the size of the tiles so as to accommodate a great many tiles to thereby facilitate the rapid laying of the tiles on the floor or other structure.

Another object of my invention resides in the provision of laminated flooring units constructed as indicated, of individual tiles or material simulating the same, associated with a foundation layer in such a way that when the unit is placed in proper position on a floor in assembled relation with other similar units, the joints between the foundation material of adjoining units will be staggered with reference to the joints between the tiles of the juxtaposed units.

Other objects and advantageous features of my invention will more readily appear from the following description and an inspection of the accompanying drawings in which:

Figure 1 shows in plan one embodiment of Y my invention,

Figure 2 is an edge view of the unit shown in Figure 1,

Figure 3 shows a section of floor laid with units embodying my invention and illustrating the manner of joining additional units to a previously laid section of flooring, and

Figure 4 is a sectional view of a number of the units in their assembled relationship.

- In accordance with my invention in one of I its embodiments, I-construct units to be laid in assembled relation with each other, each unit comprising a. base or foundation layer to one face of which a number of individual tiles or tile-like elements may be secured. Referring in detail to the drawings, the numeral l0 represents the base or foundation layer which may be of any suitable material, and preferably more or less flexible, such as felt, burlap, or similar fibrous material, water-proofed if desired, in any convenient manner. The base or foundation Inay be formed in any suitable shape such as the rectangular configuration shown in the drawings. The tiles or tile-like elements composing the wear or tread surface of the flooring may be of any desired material such as felt saturated with asphalt or other waterproofing medium and surfaced with 'the usual linseed of other oil paint coating. Instead of felt base tiles, I may employ tiles of rubber or rubber composition ofl any of the varieties no-w available. Where a cheaper type of flooring is desired, the tiles may be. cut from the ordinary asphalt saturated and coated roofing felt of the type surfaced with comminuted mineral matter.

The individual tile elements, of whatever nature they may be, are adhesively united with the base or foundation 10 by the use of any suitable cement or adhesive agent.

In Figure l, I have illustrated a series of tile elements ll and a series of similar ele ments 12, which, however, may be of different ornamental appearance than the tiles 1l so vas to produce in the completed unit a mottled appearance such asis sometimes desirable.

Itwill be seen that by alfixing a large number of these tiles to the base or foundation during the course of manufacture and assembling the units thus formed when laying the floor, the time required for laying the floor composed of individual tiles can be greatly decreased, since all that is required is to assemble the comparatively large units.

In carrying out my invention I prefer to arrange the tiles on the foundation layer in such a way that when a number of these large units are 4assembled in place, the joints lbotween the tiles of adjoining units will be out of line with the joints between the foundation layers of the several units. In order to accomplish this result, I arrange the tiles in tranverse and longitudinal rows on the base in such a way that in each alternate transverse row of tiles 'there is one tile overhanging one longitudinal edge of the foundation layer, and a corresponding tile of the intervening alternate transverse rows overhanging the opposite longitudinal edge of the foundation layer. Similarly in the alternate longitudinal rows of tiles, there is a tile overhanging one of the transverse edges of the foundation with a corresponding tile in the intervening alternate longitudinal rows overhanging the opposite transverse edge of the base. Thus, as illustrated in Fi ure 1 the alternate transverse rows of tiles have one tile element 13 overhanging the longitudinal edge 14 of the base 10 and the intervening rows B of tiles have a corresponding tile 15 overhanging the opposite longitudinal edge 16 of the base. Similarly in the alternate longitudinal rows C there is a tile element 17 overhanging one transverse edge 18 of the base, and corresponding elements 19 in the intervening longitudinal rows overhanving the opposite transverse edge 2() of the `base. As will be seen from the drawings, the foundation is so proportioned with reference to the size of the individual tiles, that the portion of each tile extending beyond the edges of the base is substantially Ione half of the area of the tile. Further, at

the end of each row of tiles opposite to the overhanging element of said row, no tile is affixed to the base and hence there is left at the opposite end of each row, an exposed area 21 of the base, corresponding in size and configuration to that of the overhanging or outwardly extending portions of the tile elements 13, 15, 17 and 19.

Where two sets of tiles of different appearance are employed, as illustrated in the drawings, it is preferred that the elements overhanging the base along one edge be of the one set while the elements overhanging the oppo'- site edge of the base be of the other set so that when the units are laid tlie differently ornamented tiles will be in proper position, as indicated in Figure 3.

I have shown in Figure 3 a section of flooring whereinva number of units as shown in Figure 1 have been laid on the floor and joined together in proper relation, this View illustrating also the manner in which-subsequent units are assembled with the previously laid section. It will be observed that the outwardly extending elements such as 15, of a previously laid section will overlap the uncovered areas 21 of the element 10a which is now being laid, while the outwardly extending tiles 13 of the unit 10a are interlitted between the units 15 and overlap the exposed areas 21a therebetween. It will be apparent,

21a that are lapped by an overhanging tile of the adjoining unit, may have any suitable form of adhesive ap lied thereto so as to more firmly secure t e adjoining units in place.

By arranging the tiles onthe foundation layer as thus described and assembling the units thus formed in the manner set forth, the joints 22 (Figure 4) between the tiles of one unit and the adjoining tiles of the adjacent unit will always fall out of line with the joints 23 between the edges of the bases of adjoining units. This staggered relation of the joints is advantageous inasmuch as it precludes access of water, moisture, dust and the like to the substructure.

I claim as my invention:

1. As a new article of manufacture, a surface covering comprising a foundation and a wearing layer composed of a plurality of tilelilre elements secured in rows to one face of said foundation, an. end element of one row extending beyond the contiguous marginal edge of the foundation and the element at the opposite end of said row terminating inwardly of the opposite contiguous edge of the foundation.

2. As a new article of manufacture, a surface covering comprising a foundation and a wearing layer composed of a plurality of tile-like elements secured in rows to one face of said foundation, the end elements in alternate rows extending beyond the contiguous marginal edges of the foundation and the end elements of intervening rows terminating inwardly of said contiguous marginal edge of the foundation.

3. As a new article of manufacture, a surface covering comprising a flexible fibrous foundation and a wearing layer composed of a plurality of tile-like elements of as halt coated felt secured in rows to one face o said foundation, the end 'element of one row extending beyond the conti uous marginal edge of the foundation andg the element at' the opposite end of said row terminating inwardly of the opposite contiguous edge of the foundation.

4. As a new article of manufacture, a surface covering comprising a flexible fibrous foundation and a wearing layer composed of a plurality of tile-like elements of asphalt coated and mineral surfaced feltsecured in rows to'one face of said foundation, the end elements in alternate rows extendingbeyond the contiguous marginal edges ofthe foundation and the end elements of intervening rows terminating inwardly of said contiguous marginal edge of the foundation.

HAROLD L. LEVIN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2466919 *Jan 30, 1947Apr 12, 1949Clint SykesTile setting template
US2882560 *Mar 10, 1955Apr 21, 1959Joseph Plendl StephenPortable floor construction
US3908326 *Dec 20, 1973Sep 30, 1975Gerald T FrancisBrick panel construction
US4016692 *Apr 25, 1975Apr 12, 1977F. Von Langsdorff Bauverfahren GmbhComposite paving structures and laying units therefor
US4548008 *Mar 25, 1983Oct 22, 1985Inax CorporationTile panel having convex and concave portions around substrate board, and method for production thereof
US6101776 *Jan 25, 1999Aug 15, 2000Cerad Industries, Inc.Sub-floor panel system
US6119423 *Sep 14, 1998Sep 19, 2000Costantino; JohnApparatus and method for installing hardwood floors
US6449913 *Feb 8, 2000Sep 17, 2002Floyd SheltonParquet flooring panel comprising spaced, wooden strips secured by adhesive and forming irregular end shapes for alignment with adjacent panels
US6694682Mar 8, 2001Feb 24, 2004The Amtico Company LimitedMulticomponent tiles and a method for manufacturing multicomponent tiles
US7658038Mar 28, 2005Feb 9, 2010Lifetime Products, Inc.System and method for constructing a modular enclosure
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US8091289 *Mar 28, 2005Jan 10, 2012Lifetime Products, Inc.Floor for a modular enclosure
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US8784001 *Feb 20, 2013Jul 22, 2014Hb Green Resources, LlcOil field rig mat assembly
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US20040151863 *Dec 31, 2003Aug 5, 2004The Amtico Company LimitedMulticomponent tiles and a method for manufacturing multicomponent tiles
US20130326989 *Jun 8, 2012Dec 12, 2013Ian David HartertWooden Floor Tile With Milled Surface
EP1132543A2 *Mar 5, 2001Sep 12, 2001The Amtico Company LimitedMulticomponent tiles and a method of manufacturing multicomponent tiles
EP1132543A3 *Mar 5, 2001Jun 19, 2002The Amtico Company LimitedMulticomponent tiles and a method of manufacturing multicomponent tiles
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/388, 404/34, 52/314, 52/591.2
International ClassificationE04F15/10
Cooperative ClassificationE04F15/10
European ClassificationE04F15/10