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Publication numberUS1828353 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 20, 1931
Filing dateOct 20, 1928
Priority dateOct 20, 1928
Publication numberUS 1828353 A, US 1828353A, US-A-1828353, US1828353 A, US1828353A
InventorsBleser Joseph F
Original AssigneeBleser Joseph F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Internal combustion motor
US 1828353 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 20, 1931. BLESER I 1,828,353 I INTERNAL COMBUSTI 0N MOTOR Filed Oct. 20, 1928 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 ZNVEA/TOR.

ATTORNEY Oct. 20, 1931. J. F. BLESER 1,328,353

INTERNAL COMBUSTION MOTOR Filed Oct. 20. 1928 s Sheets-Sheet 2 Q a IIgV X QQORJ A TTORNEY,

Oct. 20, 1931.- J, F. BLESER INTERNAL COMBUSTION MQTOR Filed Oct. 20, 1928 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR.

ATTORNEYSQ Patented Oct. 20, 1931 PATENT OFFICE JosErn r. BLESER, or SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS INTERNAL COMBUSTION MOTOR Application filed October 20, 1928. Serial No. 313,901.

I My invention relates to motors of a class adapted to be used for turning drive shafts and the like; an object being in the motor particularly to drive airplane propeller shafts with a minimum of motor head wind resistance.

A further object of my invention is to provide a motor having a maximum of ower in a minimum of space occupied there y.

A further object of my invention is to provide a motor that can be installed in a relatively small space and be operatively connect- .ed with generators, machines, vehicles and other driven mechanism such as may be I adapted to motor driven control in addition to its use as an airplane or automobile or boat driving motor where a maximum of power with a minimum of motor weight may bea great advantage. a

I attain the objects of my invention in the device described in the annexed specification, recited in the claims, and illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which like/reference numerals indicate like parts in the several figures,

Referring to the figures Fi 1 is a side elevation of my motor with detai s of the structural arrangement shown in a longitudinal half section as. a cut-away exposes the same to viewn Fig. 2 is an enlarged detail of one end of my motor showing in a cut-away a more complete disclosure of the structure thereof.

Fig. 3 is an end View of my motor disclosing in a cut-away a cross section of the cylinders and water acket and the relative position of the intake and exhaust pipescommunicating with the cylinders; while inthe portion not in cut-away there is disclosed to view the valve tappets and rocker arms and valve control cams through which the explosions in the cylinders are timed and controlled.

Fig. 4 is a detailed perspective of one of the double headed pistons in mymotor.

Fig. 5 is a detail of the camwheel adapted to be controllably connected with the pistons in my motor in a manner shown in this section to be adapted to rotate the shafts ,on which the cam is mounted by the reciprocal movements ofthe pistons in a direction parallel with the shaft "1n their respective cylinders of the motor.

Fig. 6 is a perspective of the cam plate adapted to control the movements of the valve tappets of my motor.

Fig. 7 is a perspective of the cam wheel of my invention adaptedto be controllably connected with the pistons of my motor.

' Fig. 8 is a chart illustrating the cam movement of the cam wheel controlled by the double headed pistons in my motor.

Referrin in detail to the structure of my motor and t e preferred method of operating the same I provide securely mounted on a shaft -1- acam wheel,2- adapted to be rotated with the shaft through the reciprocal action thereon of a number of double headed pistons uniformly spaced apart, parallel with and equidistant from, the central shaft sup- 7 porting the cam wheel.

The rim 4- of cam wheel 2 rotates between rollers 5 and 6 of-double headed pistons 7- each having oppositely disposed piston heads -8- and -9 adapted to move by reciprocal movement in a direction parallel with shaft 1.

. These double headed pistons are operatively mounted within cylinders in my motor which are parallel with the shaft, arranged inpairs each member of which is, oppositely disposed in longitudinal alignmentiwith the other. These pairs of aligned cylinders are cylindrically disposed about the shaft so as to make the istons operating therein move 8 in parallel a ignment with the shaft whe'n they are in normal operation. Inmy motor I provide a plurality of these pistons each controllably and operativel connected with the cam wheel .-2- throu the contact of rollers 5 and -6 of t e pistons with camriin 4.

My motor is preferably water cooled and for this arrangement I provide for each cylinder to be surrounded with water in .water jacket 12-. a

My motor is so.-designed as to have the general shape of a cylinder inclosin the combustion cylinders and double headed pistons therein a ut the cylinder wall in a manner to be substantially secured to the structure within which or on which-it is adapted to operate.

Shaft 1- is rotatably mounted within the longitudinal center of my motor block with cam wheel 2 rigidly secured there to and with shaft -1- rotating in bearings 14 and 15- with the aid of thrust bearings 16 and 17- adapted to hold the shaft --1-- in its proper relative longitudinal position with respect to the motor.

The design of my motor makes it essential that its opposite ends forming cylinder heads be detachable to provide access to the combustion chambers operatively supporting the double headed pistons.

These cylinder heads are secured in their operative position by bolts such as 18- and l9-- at one end; 20 and 21 at the other.

Hoods 22 and 23 are provided at the respective ends of the motor for protecin some such recesses as are '65 tion of the valve tappets, rocker arms, etc.

Cam plates 24- and -25 are'substantially secured to shaft 1-- each in their respective operative position.

Cam plates 21 and '25- have double cam faces each integral therewith and concentrically disposed thereon. These cam faces are designated by numerals 26 and 27' at one end of the motor and 28-- and 29 at the other end of the motor.

Cam faces 26 and -2'7, 28, and 29 rotate respectively with their integral cam plates 24. and 25 and are shaped somewhat as shown in Fig. 6 on those plates. These cam faces are adapted to control the thrust movement of tappets 30, 31, 32, and 33- controllably connected with rocker arms 34.-- 35'-, 36- and 37 which in turn respectively control valves 38 -39, 40 and 41.

It will be noted that cam faces -26 and 28 control th movement of intake valves 38 and --4 respectively. In like manner cam faces 27- and --29 control the movement of exhaust valves 39 and -41 respectively.

Referring to Fig. 3 it will be observed tha I connect with the respective cylinders an intake manifold pipe 42 and an exhaust manifold pipe 43- and in order to make my motor more compact where it, may be used for airplane driving purposes I hold these manifolds preferably in close contact with the cylindrical sides of the motor block shown in Fig. 3 at numeral 44.

The carburator for my inotor is indicated in Fig. 1 and numeral 45- while manifold ring 46 connects with all the distributing intake manifolds 42- running therefrom to the cylinders in their turn at the respective ends of my motor.

In like manner exhaust manifolds -43- connecting with each cylinder preferably communicates with a discharge manifold 47 for the exhaust gases from the cylinders in their turn at the respective ends of the motor..

I have shown in Fig. 1 a propeller 48 adapted to be operatively mounted on the drive shaft of my motor indicating the possibility of using the motor with which to drive the airplane or for driving a boat and I might have illustrated other ways of connecting up my motor as a source of driving power. For instance my motor would be adaptable to use in driving electric generators, machine tools, conveyors, elevators, cen trifugal pumps, automobiles, trains, dirigibles, cranes and other such machines and vehicles as may require the use of internal combustion motors.

Referring to Fig. 7 it will be observed that cam wheel -2 is shaped so as to form rim 4 thereof in an annular zig-zag curve which provides within the complete circumference of the cam wheel two oppositely disposed maximum high points one hundred and eighty degrees from each other and also two oppositely disposed low points one hundred eighty degrees from each other while each low point is ninety degrees from each high point. This construction of cam wheel 2- is also shown in Fig. 5.

In a study of Fig. 8 there will be observed the extent of movement of the double-headed pistons 7 where each cylinder fires once to every revolution of the cam and also on this chart there is shown the pitch ofthe zigzag curves in the annular cam rim. 7 Eachcylinder on each end of the motor 1s provided with two spark plugs -49, 50, -51, and 52- to provide a double safety ignition circuit. In the sectional views Fig. 1 and Fig. 2 these spark plugs cannot well be shown. The ignition system of my motor is not shown since any one of a number of timing and distributing systems now on the market could be adapted to be used in my motor.

By a further study of the chart in Fig. 8 there will be seen the relative position of the respective pistons in their normal movements at a given time in their reciprocal action. This chart shows a development of the curve shape of rim 4 of cam wheel 2 as well as a development of the respective intake and exhaust cam faces 26- and -27- of cam plate -24- and faces -28 and 29 of cam plate -25 which control the intake and exhaust valves for the cylinders of my motor.

Referring to Fig. 6 for the construction of I, cam .plates -24 and 25 it will be seen '5' that the valve controlling lugs on the faces of these cams are each confined to a relatively small rise extending approximately one fourth the way around the'cam face circle. I In a further study of the'chart in Fig. 8 10 the development of the cam wheel rim represented by the curve AB the curve is represented as moving in the direction indicated by the arrows while the cam plates 24 and 25 turn with shaft 1 as it rotates cam wheel -2.

Cam plate -24 has intake cam face 26 and exhaust cam face 27. Cam plate has intake cam face 28 and exhaust cam face -29- as shown in the chart in Fig. 8.

It will be observed in this chart that this plate is divided into four parts each of. equal length for showing the timing arrangement of the faces on the camplate --24- and25-.

25 Each of these faces effect the movement of its corresponding intake or outlet explosion chamber valve over approximately a quarter of its turn in rotating with the respective cam wheels on shaft 1.

The firing of the cylinders in order according to their relative adjacent successive positions disposed about the shaft causes the respective pistons to move in a manner that controls the rotating movement of cam wheel -2 shown on the chart as the development of the cam wheel rim there designated by the zig-zag line A-B.

For instance line mn represents the middle point in the movement of each piston between its opposite limits.

When cylinder a' is fired it causes the entire curve AB to move forward in the direction of the arrows one twentieth of a turn until position m-w moves forward to coincide with positions a at which time opposite cylinder a fires moving the curve down another twentieth of a turn until the point of the curve registering with cylinder -aon the first firing again takes place on the same end of the motor with cylinder --a thus forcing urve AB forward until the position of the curve starting at point y of the chart now "registers with cylinder 7" where the rotating cam rim again gets another thrust forward from the explosion in cylinder j and so on around the motor as alternate cylinders fire on opposite ends of the motor at intervals of one twentieth of a turn of the rotating cam wheel onthe shaft.

Intake cam face -26 and exhaust cam face 27-of camplate -24- adapted to control the intake and exhaust valves in .their respective positions control the cylinders on one end of my motor while intake cam face -29'- and exhaust cam face '28 on cam plate --25 are adapted to control the move- I ment of intake and exhaust valves respectively for the cylinders on the other end of my motor.

It'will therefore be seen that by placingcam faces 26and 27 in suitable posi-, tion for control of the corresponding intake and exhaust valves at one end of the motor the explosion applied thereto through the' rollers 5- and 6- alternately to the rim 4. I

7 It will therefore be seen that the shaft -1- is caused to rotate by carefully timed explosions in the cylinders at opposite ends of my motor affecting the movement of the pistons 7 back and forth which act "upon the zig zag curved surface of rim 4 of cam wheel 2 causingthe cam wheel to rotate and carry with it the shaft 1.

To those engineers who are acquainted with internal combustion motors it will be evident that certain minor changes may be made in the details of structure thereof and still stay within the spirit and scope of my invention.

For instance any one of numerous ignition and carburating systems may be used successfully in controlling my motor but the novel features of my motor are recited in the claims which follow.

Having thus described the nature of my motor and the operating principles thereof what I claim is: i

1. In an internal combustion engine, the combination of a plurality'of abutting annular cylinder blocks secured together'jat their abutting edges and having chambers formed therein and communicating at the abutting edges of said blocks forreceiving a cooling fluid, a shaft rotatably mounted in said blocks, oppositely disposed integral pistons slidably mounted in the blocks, and a double faced cam secured to said shaft and operatively related to said pistons in a manner to rotated thereby for imparting a rotary motion to said shaft.

2. In an internal combustion engine, the combination of a plurality of abutting annular cylinder blocks secured together at their abutting edges and having communicating chambers for receiving a cooling fluid, a shaft rotatably mounted in'saidblocks, op positely disposed integral pistons slidably mounted in the respective blocks, and a.

double faced cam'secured to said shaft and having a mean radial plane substantially co incident with the plane of the abutting edges of said blocks, the said cam being operatively related to said istons in a manner to be rotated thereby for imparting a rotary motion to said shaft.

3. In an internal combustion engine, the combination of a plurality of oppositely disposed end abutting annular cylinder blocks secured together at their abutting ends and having a plurality of aligned annularly spaced cylinders formed in the respective blocks, said blocks having chambers formed therein surrounding said cylinders and communicatin with each other at the abutting ends of said blocks, a shaft having its axial line of rotation positioned substantially coincident with the axial line of said blocks and rotatably mounted therein, a plurality of oppositely disposed integral pistons mounted in said aligned cylinders, a double faced cam secured to said shaft and having a mean radial plane substantially coincident with the plane of the abutting ends of said blocks, pairs of anti-friction rollers mounted on said pistons and engageable with the faces of said cam in a manner to impart a rotary motion to said cam and shaft when said pistons are driven, head members secured to the outer ends of said blocks, intake and exhaust valves mounted in said members, and means mounted on said shaft for actuating said valves.

4. In an internal combustion engine, the combination of a plurality of oppositely disposed end abutting cylinder blocks having a plurality of aligned cylinders formed therein and having grooves formed in the respective blocks communicating at the abutting ends thereof, a shaft rotatably mounted in the blocks, a plurality of oppositely disposed pistons mounted in said cylinders, a cam secured take and exhaust manifolds mounted in said grooves and communicating with said cylinders through said intake and exhaust valves, respectively, and a plurality of cams carried by said shaft for actuating said valves.

In witness whereof I hereunto set my hand this 15th day of October, 1928.

JOSEPH F. BLESER.

to said shaft and operatively related'to said pistons for imparting rotation to said shaft,

and intake and exhaust manifolds mounted in said grooves and communicating with said cylinders.

5. In an internal combustion engine, the combination of a plurality of oppositely disposed end abutting cylinder blocks having a plurality of aligned cylinders formed therein and having a plurality of annularly spaced longitudinally extending grooves formed in the respective blocks communicating at the abutting ends thereof, a shaft rotatably mounted in the blocks, a plurality of oppositely disposed pistons mounted in said cylinders, a cam secured to said shaft and operatively related to said pistons for imparting rotation to said shaft, and intake and exhaust .manifolds mounted in said grooves and communicating with said cylinders.

6. In an internal combustion engine, the combination of a plurality of opposltely disposed end abutting annular cylinder blocks having a p'luralit of aligned annularly spaced cylinders ormed inthe respective

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2457183 *Mar 22, 1946Dec 28, 1948Steel Products Engineering CoCooling jacket and cylinder construction
US3385051 *Feb 10, 1967May 28, 1968Donald A. KellyStirling cycle engine with two wave cam means, two piston banks and driveshaft
US3403508 *Dec 9, 1966Oct 1, 1968Donald A. KellyStirling cycle engine with wave-cam means interconnecting pistons and drive shaft thereof
US3407593 *Apr 10, 1967Oct 29, 1968Donald A. KellyReciprocating stirling cycle engine with dual wave cam drive
US6938590 *Apr 13, 2004Sep 6, 2005Terry BuelnaRotary piston motor
US7464673 *Aug 14, 2006Dec 16, 2008Thomas Engine Company, LlcSingle-ended barrel engine with double-ended, double roller pistons
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/41.72, 384/38, 123/56.8, 123/41.74
International ClassificationF01B3/04, F02B61/00, F02B61/04, F01B3/00
Cooperative ClassificationF02B61/04, F01B3/04
European ClassificationF01B3/04