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Publication numberUS1831339 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 10, 1931
Filing dateMay 21, 1928
Priority dateMay 21, 1928
Publication numberUS 1831339 A, US 1831339A, US-A-1831339, US1831339 A, US1831339A
InventorsAlanson P Brush
Original AssigneeAlanson P Brush
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Boat
US 1831339 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. F BRUSH Nov. 10, 1931.

BOAT

2 Sheeis-Sheet 1 Filed May 21, 1928 INVENTOR. I44 fl/YJO/V P BEUSH ATTORNEY.

Nov. 10, 1931. A. P. BRUSH 1,831,339

BOAT

Filed May 21 1928 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented Nov. 10, 1931 UNITED STATES ALANSON I. BRUSH, OF DETROIT, MICHIGAN BOAT Application filed May 21, 1928. Serial No. 279,348.

This invention relates to boats and particularly to that type thereof commonly known as hydroplanes, the principal object being to provide a boat of this type that will have a 5 minimum of wetted surfaces and maximum stability.

In boats of this type, which differ from the ordinary displacement type of boat in that they depend upon the-reaction of the water against their bottoms due to their speed to raise them sufiicientlyout of-the'water so that they skim alongor over the top thereof rather than through the water, it has been found necessary in order to'obtain longitudinal stability of the boat, so that it will not jump While traveling over the Water, to provide one or more steps in the bottom surface thereof, so that when the boat is traveling over the water it has two distinct points of support on the water longitudinally spaced from each other. Furthermore, as it is necessary for the successful operation of a boat of this type that it travel at a relatively high speed in order that 'it may plane sufficiently to get on top of the water rather than pass through the same, it is necessary in order to obtain lateral stability to make the boat wider than would otherwise be necessary to obtain sufficient planing surfaces for the proper lifting or planing thereof.

Furthermore, in this type of boat as heretofore constructed, the angle of the bottom 'or planing surfaces changes Withthe speed of the boat due to the fact the rear planing surface travels over the water which has immediately previously been traveled over by the forward planing surface andsuch water has been displaced from its normal level an amount dependent upon the displacement of the first planing surface in-the' water, which displacement is usually a function of the speed and other characteristics of the boat.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a boat of the type described so constructed as to have a greater longitudinal stability than hydroplanes of conventiona] construction and to have a greater lateral stability than hydroplanes of the conventional constructiom and yet in which it is possible to have a smaller wetted surface,

thereby decreasing the friction between the type described in which the planing surfaces are so arranged with respectto each other that none of them are subjected to the water disturbed by another thereof.

A further object is to provide a boat that; presents maximum stability both at rest and while running.

The above being among the objects of the present invention the same consists in certain features of'construction and combinationsof parts to be hereinafter described with reference to the accompanying drawings, and then claimed, having the above and other objects in view. r

In the accompanying drawings which illustrate. suitable embodiments of the present invention and in which like numerals refer to like parts throughout the several different views,

Fig. 1 is a more or less diagrammatic side elevation of a hydroplaneconstructed in ac cordance with the present invention.

Fig. 2 is a plan view of the hydroplane shown in Fig. 1.

Figs. 3, 4L, 5 and 6 are sections taken on the lines 3, 4, 5 and 6 respectively of Fig. 1.

As illustrated in Fig. 1 the boat is provided with a singlestep in its bottom at 10. The hull is also provided on each side with two chines 11 and 12. The lower chine 11 terminates at the step 10 near or in the plane of the keel and at a point approximately mid way between the keel and the side of the boat. The chine 12' at the point where it reaches the step 10 longitudinally of the boat is preferably positioned substantially above the top of the step 10 as shown andcontinues rearwardly therefrom to the stern 1 1 which it reaches at substantially the same horizontal level, when the boat is in operation, as the bottom of the step 10. The surfaces 15 and 15 between thechines 11 and '12 extend upwardly and outwardly from the chines 11 so that when the boat is in operation and skimming over the water, the only surface thereof in contact with the water forwardly of the step 10 is that surface between the chines 11 for a short distance forwardly of the step 10. This surface is gradually flattened towards the stern of the boat until at the step 10 it provides a substantially flat planing surface 16, as best illustrated in Fig. 4, while the surfaces 15 and 15 extending upwardly and outwardly therefrom are entirely clear of the water at such point. The surface 17 which extends rearwardly from the step 10 between the extended lines of the chines 11 preferably turns upwardly a slight amount towards the stern let where it terminates, but in no case is it desirable that it extend rearwardly from the top of the step 10 below a horizontal line through the top of the step 10 when the boat is in proper planing position. i

The surfaces 15 rearwardly of the step 10 gradually flatten out and as they are positioned below the surface 17, they present adjacent the stern 1% two spaced planing sur faces 18 extending from the outer edge of the hull inwardly to the corresponding edge of the surface 17. The result is that forwardly of the step 10 the boat is provided with a single central planing surface 16 and adjacent the stern is provided with a pair of relatively widely spaced planing surfaces 18, and these three surfaces constitute substantially all of the wetted surface of the boat when the boat is planing properly on the surface of the water. The surfaces 18, being relatively widely spaced from each other, impart great lateral stability to the boat which allows it to make relatively short turns at greater speeds than in the case of conventional constructions without danger of overturning, and the surfaces 18 being spaced longitudinally of the boat from the surface 16 gives the boat longitudinal stability.

The surfaces 18, being spaced outwardly of the surface 16, are not affected by any disturbance of the water which may be set up by the surface 16 passing over the same as is necessarily the case in conventional constructions, and inasmuch as the surfaces 18 there-' fore contact with relatively undisturbed water surface, the resistance to the passage of the same over the water is less than the rear planing surface in conventional constructions. Furthermore, in view of the fact that all of the planing surfaces are contacting with undisturbed and undisplaced water, the

boat will remain on a predetermined keel angle regardless of the speed thereof. This feature insures greater longitudinal stability of the boat than conventional constructions. In addition, in view of the fact that the speed of the boat for a given power output is dependent upon the resistance of the air and water and a function of the angle of the planing surfaces of the boat relative to the sur- 5 face of the water multiplied by the unit weight thereon, with the present design of boat the angle of the planing surfaces may be formed to achieve optimum conditions and will remain substantially constant throughout the range of speed of the boat.

The surface 17, which in effect extends the surface 16 rearwardly of the step 10, is preferably of a sufficient height so that the wave which often follows a planing surface in the water and is caused by the amount of necessary displacement of the surface in the water, is preferably of such a height that the following wave does not contact with it so as to add any increase in the wetted surface of the hull. In order to prevent any suction building upback of the step 10 that might tend to aggravate the following wave and to draw water rearwardly thereof up into contact with the surface 17 or otherwise interfere with the free passage of the boat through the water, bleeder tubes such as 20 may be provided for allowing the free passage of air from above the level of the water to the bottom of the surface 17 immediately to the rear of the step 10. I

WVith this construction it will be apparent that the boat may beso designed that the planing surfaces 16 and 18 may be made of the minimum dimensions necessary to obtain proper planing without providing an excessive amount of wetted surface to obtain the desired lateral stability, and at the same time all of the surfaces contact with relatively undisturbed water surface. Although the forward section of the boat is shown as of a modified V-type, it will be apparent that the same may be of an inverted V-type in which the sides of the boat in the region of the bow are of a greater depth than the center portion thereof, without anywise afiecting the present invention, and it will also be apparent that the planing surfaces 16 and 18 may be made either slightly concave or convex and that the step 10 may be either straight transversely of the boat or else have its center portion bent either forwardly or rearwardly of its ends in plan view without affecting the present invention. While it is also possible to construct the boat with the spaced planing surfaces adjacent the midpoint of the boat and the single planing surfaces at the stern,

'I prefer to employ these planing surfaces in approximately the location shown in the drawings as I believe more lateral stability is obtained thereby.

Formal changes may be made in the specific embodiment of the invention described without departing from the spirit or substance of the broad invention, the scope of which is commensurate with the appended claims.

lVhat I claim is:

1. A. boat having but three longitudinally non-aligned planing surfaces formed on the bottom thereof, said plaining surfaces being so arranged that lines connecting the centers of areas thereof form a triangle.

2. A boat having the bottom thereof formed to present only three major planing surfaces, one of which is spaced forwardly from the other two, and said other two surfaces being spaced from each other transversely of said boat, and out of overlapping relationship longitudinally of said boat with respect to the first mentioned surface.

3. A boat having the bottom thereof formed to present three planing surfaces only, one of which is spaced forwardly from the other two, and said other two surfaces being spaced from each other transversely of said boat by a distance approximately equal to the transverse dimension of the first mentioned surface.

4. A boat having three planing surfaces on r the bottom thereof, one of which constitutes substantially half of the total planing surface area of said boat.

5. A boat having three planing surfaces on the bottom thereof, one of which constitutes substantially half of the total planing surface area of said boat and the other two planing surfaces having areas substantially equal to each other.

6. A boat having only three planing surfaces on the bottom thereof, one of which is spaced longitudinally of said boat from the other two thereof, and said other two planing surfaces being spaced from eachother transversely of said boat.

7. A boat having only three planing surfaces on the bottom thereof, one of which is spaced longitudinally of said boat from the other two thereof, and said other two planing surfaces being spaced from each other transversely of said boat an amount at least equal to the width of the first mentioned planing surface.

8. A boat having only three planing surfaces on the bottom thereof, one of which is spaced longitudinally of said boat from the other two thereof, and said other two planing surfaces being spaced from each other transversely of said boat an amount substantially equal to the width of the first mentioned planing surface.

ALANSON P. BRUSH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3016863 *Mar 30, 1960Jan 16, 1962Johnson Jr Virgil EHydrofoil
US3077617 *Jan 26, 1961Feb 19, 1963Steffel Lu Verne GWater ski construction
US3091206 *May 27, 1959May 28, 1963Cale Richard CHigh speed planing hull
US3099025 *Mar 29, 1963Jul 30, 1963Kruger Ray HWater ski
US3203389 *Oct 18, 1961Aug 31, 1965Richard C CaleStabilized planing hull
US3225729 *Dec 11, 1963Dec 28, 1965Ewing Jr Fred BHigh speed sea going planing hull
US3316874 *Oct 9, 1964May 2, 1967Canazzi Henry DonaldBoat hulls
US3469549 *Jan 11, 1968Sep 30, 1969Randolph S RaePlaning boat
US4031841 *Jun 30, 1975Jun 28, 1977Bredt-Kat, Inc.Controlled air film hull for watercraft
US5452675 *Apr 24, 1992Sep 26, 1995Nevid Nominees Pty Ltd.Boat hull
US6666160 *Mar 15, 2001Dec 23, 2003Oerneblad StenHigh aspect dynamic lift boat hull
US8291850 *Feb 14, 2008Oct 23, 2012Michael Paul PetersStabilized step hull utilizing a ventilated tunnel
US8800464 *Oct 23, 2012Aug 12, 2014Michael Paul PetersStabilized step hull utilizing a ventilated tunnel
US20150114278 *Oct 29, 2013Apr 30, 2015Ram Investments of South Florida Inc.Stepped hull
EP0359825A1 *Oct 31, 1988Mar 28, 1990MITSUI ENGINEERING & SHIPBUILDING CO., LTDGlide boat
WO1992019489A1 *Apr 24, 1992Nov 12, 1992Nevid Nominees Pty LtdA boat hull
Classifications
U.S. Classification114/289, 114/291
International ClassificationB63B1/20
Cooperative ClassificationB63B1/20, B63B2001/202
European ClassificationB63B1/20